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Plato

Revd Patrick Brontë's Newfoundland dog (crossed with a water-spaniel), acquired by him ‘in the middle of 1855—for £3-0-0’ (Lock & Dixon, p. 481). Plato was taken to Ireland by Nicholls ...

Plato

Plato   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
8 words

... ( see facing page...

PLATO

PLATO   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Astronomy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... Abbr. for PLanetary Transits and Oscillations ....

Plato

Plato   Reference library

Concise Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Names studies
Length:
18 words

... 1881: 41; London. English: variant of Plater . Final -o(w) and -er are often interchanged in modern...

Plato

Plato (347 B.C.E.)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
170 words

...Plato (d. 347 B.C.E. ) Arabic Aflaton . Hellenistic philosopher, some of whose writings ( Timaeus , Republic , and Laws ) were partially translated into Arabic during the Middle Ages. Much was known of Plato's works through oral transmission as well. Thus, in his Philosophy of Plato , al-Farabi (d. 950 ) provided an extensive account of Plato's philosophy, identifying all of the dialogues now accepted as authentic and providing a reasonable explanation of the topic covered in each. Either because of his penchant for metaphysical investigations or due...

Plato

Plato   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Plato , Revd Patrick Brontë 's Newfoundland dog (crossed with a water-spaniel), acquired by him ‘in the middle of 1855 —for £3-0-0’ (Lock & Dixon, p. 481). Plato was taken to Ireland by Nicholls after Mr Brontë 's death and died there in 1866 (Lock & Dixon, pp. 530,...

Plato

Plato (427–347)   Reference library

Andrew Louth and Lewis Ayres

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
1,655 words

... (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato (Cambridge, 1992). G. Vlastos , Plato’s Universe (Oxford, 1975). T. Irwin , Plato’s Moral Theory: The Early and Middle Dialogues (Oxford, 1977). I. Murdoch , The Fire and the Sun: Why Plato Banished the Artists (Oxford, 1977). C. Osborne , Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love (Oxford, 1994). R. B. Rutherford , The Art of Plato (London, 1995). C. Rowe , Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing (Cambridge, 2007). C. Rowett , Knowledge and Truth in Plato: Stepping Past the Shadow of...

Plato

Plato (c.427–c.347 bc)   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
224 words

...Plato sought to educate Dionysius II as a philosopher-king and to set up an ideal political system under him, but the venture failed. Meanwhile, in Athens, Plato set up his famous Academy ( c .387 bc ). In the Academy he taught several young people, including Aristotle . In addition to being a philosopher of great influence, Plato wrote in the form of dialogues, in which Socrates genially interrogates another person, demolishing their arguments. All of Plato's 36 works survive. His most famous dialogues include Gorgias (on rhetoric as an art of...

Plato

Plato (c.429–347 bc)   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to George Eliot

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
162 words

... ( c. 429–347 bc ), Greek philosopher whose work formed part of George Eliot 's extensive reading, though it appears not to have appealed to her strongly. When staying with George *Combe in Edinburgh in 1852 , she remarked rather acidly that, although there were many visitors and much conversation at the Combes', her host's interlocutors had little to do but ‘shape elegant modes of negation and affirmation like the people who are talked to by Socrates in Plato's dialogues’ ( L ii. 59). The following year she observed in a letter to Combe that the...

Plato

Plato   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Western Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
134 words

... (late 5th–4th centuries bc ). Greek philosopher. In his Republic , Plato introduces the concept of the perfect Form, created by God. What exists on earth is only an imperfect imitation of this ideal; art as secondary mimesis is necessarily even further removed from this ‘Form’. This theory is developed further in his Sophist where sculptors are attacked for ignoring truth. Thus, Plato was important for the development of an art criticism based on ‘moralistic’ aesthetics. This aesthetic is tied in turn to a dual conception of the concept of...

Plato

Plato   Reference library

Christopher Janaway, Paul Woodruff, Paul Woodruff, Julius Moravcsik, and Julius Moravcsik

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
14,205 words

... . To explore Plato’s philosophy of art, the first of its kind in the history of Western philosophy, this entry comprises five essays: Plato and the Arts Plato on Mimēsis Plato’s Use of Poetry Plato on the Effects of Art Plato and Modern Aesthetics The first essay is an overview of Plato’s thought in general. The next three essays focus on issues that were central to his thinking about art (a term Plato, of course, did not use the way we now do, anymore than he ever used the word aesthetics): mimesis, the use of poetry, and the effects of art. The...

Plato

Plato   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...end of prose 12). It later became proverbial. Chaucer's ascription of it in The Manciple's Tale to ‘the wise Plato’ perhaps suggests that it may already have been a maxim. The philosopher appears in an alchemical context in The Canon's Yeoman's Tale (VIII.1448–71), where the dialogue between Plato and a disciple seems to have been expanded by Chaucer from a passage in a Latin version of a commentary by ‘ Senior ’. Here Chaucer makes Plato refer to Christ. In The House of Fame there are two cosmological references. ‘Daun Platon’ is linked with...

Plato

Plato   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... The great Athenian philosopher ( c. 428–348 bc ), the pupil of socrates and founder of the academy . Of his numerous writings, The republic has perhaps been the most influential. He was originally called Aristocles; the name Plato is said to have been bestowed by his gymnastic teacher, from his broad shoulders (Greek platus , ‘flat’). Some say it arose from the breadth of his forehead. Platonic cycle or great year, The That space of time that, according to ancient astronomers, elapses before all the stars and constellations return to their former...

Plato

Plato (424/3–c.348/7)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
529 words

...as a passionate but asexual joint search for the truth.) Plato's influence on European philosophy and literature is largely indirect: through Augustine , through the Florentine Platonists, but above all through the Neoplatonists , especially Plotinus , who for many was indistinguishable from Plato. Central, for English literature, was the neo‐Platonizing Thomas Taylor , who completed the first English translation of the whole corpus ( 1804 ): S. T. Coleridge and P. B. Shelley could read Plato for themselves, but Coleridge also read Taylor's...

Plato

Plato (c.424/3–c.348/7 bc)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
398 words

... ( c. 424/3– c. 348/7 bc ) With Socrates , who taught him, and Aristotle , whom he taught, a dominant philosophical figure of classical antiquity, author of numerous dialogues and founder of the Athenian Academy, a school formally closed by Justinian in ad 529 . The dialogues—‘Socrates’ mostly leads; Plato himself is permanently absent—fall stylistically into three chronological groups: (I) Defence of Socrates (‘ Apology ’: actually not a dialogue), Charmides , Cratylus , Crito , Euthydemus , Euthyphro , Gorgias , Hippias Minor , Ion , ...

Plato

Plato (c.429–c.347 bc)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
150 words

... ( c .429– c .347 bc ) Greek philosopher . He was a disciple of Socrates and the teacher of Aristotle, and he founded the Academy in Athens. His system of thought had a profound influence on Christian theology and Western philosophy. His philosophical writings, which cover metaphysics, politics, and ethics, are presented in the form of dialogues, with Socrates as the principal speaker; they include the Symposium and the Phaedo . An integral part of his thought is the theory of ‘ideas’ or ‘forms’, in which abstract entities or universals are contrasted...

Plato

Plato   Reference library

John Duffy and Alexander Kazhdan

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
703 words

... ancient Greek philosopher; born ca. 429 b.c., died 347 . He was, along with Aristotle , one of the pillars of Greek philosophy whose works the Byz. carefully transmitted, despite occasional lapses in interest and some hostility to his thought. Numerous papyri of Plato survive from late antique Egypt. Approximately 260 MSS of Plato, about a quarter of the number for Aristotle, are preserved from the 9th to the 16th C. The difference is partly owing to the more controversial nature of Plato's philosophy and to the fact that Aristotelian logic , a...

Plato

Plato (c.429–347)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Philosophy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
802 words

.... On return from Sicily he began formal teaching at what became the Academy . Details of Plato’s life are surprisingly sparse, partly because of the Athenian convention against naming contemporaries in literary works; Aristotle , for example, although a student at the Academy for some twenty years, gives us no information about Plato’s life. As a result the dating of his works has to be established on internal evidence, and is subject to scholarly dispute. Plato’s fame rests on his Dialogues which are all preserved. They are usually divided into three...

Plato

Plato (1) (c.429–347 bc)(of Athens)   Reference library

Julia Annas

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
3,893 words

...L. Owen's influential articles on Plato can be found in his collected papers , Logic, Science and Dialectic (1986). There have been several recent collections of articles; see G. Fine (ed.), Plato 1 and Plato 2 (1999); E. Wagner (ed.), Essays on Plato's Psychology (2001); G. Fine , Plato on Knowledge and Forms (2003). See also M. Ostwald and J. Lynch , CAH 6 2 (1994), 602 ff.; R. B. Rutherford , The Art of Plato (1995; on literary aspects); C. Gill and M. M. McCabe (eds.), Form and Argument in Late Plato (1996); J. Annas and C. Rowe ...

Plato

Plato (c. 429–347bce)   Reference library

International Encyclopedia of Linguistics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
57 words

... ( c. 429–347 bce ). Greek philosopher. One of his shorter dialogues, the Cratylus , is the earliest full discussion in the Western tradition of the relations between words and things. He was also the first ancient author to speak of tekhnē grammatikē and to indicate the distinction between what were later called “subject” and “predicate.” Anna Morpurgo...

Plato

Plato (c.429 bc)   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Classical Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Classical studies
Length:
1,211 words

...of true beauty. W. Verdenius : Mimesis: Plato’s Doctrine of Aesthetic Imitation (Leiden, 1949) W. D. Ross : Plato’s Theory of Forms, An Examination of Plato’s Doctrines , ed. I. Crombie (London, 1962–3) G. Sörbom : Mimesis and Art (Uppsala, 1966) W. K. C. Guthrie : A History of Greek Philosophy , iv and v (Cambridge, 1975 and 1978) I. Murdoch : The Fire and the Sun (Oxford, 1977) J. Moravcsik and P. Temko , eds: Plato on Beauty, Wisdom and the Arts (New Jersey, 1982) S. Halliwell : Plato, Republic: Book X (Bristol, 1988) D. T....

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