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Overview

plasticity

The property of solids that causes them to change permanently in size or shape as a result of the application of a stress in excess of a certain value, called the yield point.

plasticity

plasticity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... A property of any material that can...

plasticity

plasticity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Chemical Engineering

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...plasticity The ability of a body to retain a deformation in shape when a particular loading has been applied and then withdrawn. Fluids that exhibit plasticity require an applied shear stress to exceed the yield stress before flow can occur. The greater the yield stress, the greater the plasticity. ...

plasticity

plasticity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... The ability of a material to deform under load, without facture, and when the load is removed the deformation remains; see also elasticity...

plasticity

plasticity   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... ( plastic behaviour ) 1 Property of a body that causes it to he deformed permanently when a force is applied. Compare elasticity . 2 In sociology and psychology, applied to the modifiability of human behaviour; plastic...

plasticity

plasticity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Physics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Physics
Length:
34 words

...plasticity The property of solids that causes them to change permanently in size or shape as a result of the application of a stress in excess of a certain value, called the yield point ....

Plasticity

Plasticity   Reference library

Anthony Cutler

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
175 words

... the quality in an image of appearing to be modeled, and esp. of being monumental and thus “real.” In classical relief sculpture plasticity was achieved by carefully graduated planes of recession and the use of undercutting: these techniques mark the best ivory carving of the 10th C. Similarly, the illusion of solidity in a figure painted on a two-dimensional surface depends upon the suggestion of a reciprocal relationship between light and shade and the presence of tonal gradations, particularly on flesh and drapery, to represent the gamut between...

Plasticity

Plasticity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Epidemiology (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...Plasticity The potential for change in the intrinsic characteristics of a cell, tissue, system, or whole organism in response to environmental stimuli. The ability of a genotype to produce more than one alternative form of structure, physiological state, or behavior in response to environmental conditions. It is a quality of organisms as they develop, and diminishes with increasing age or after a critical developmental period. Within the limits imposed by genetic and mechanical constraints, each person has a range of options for her Life Course and final...

PLASTICITY

PLASTICITY   Reference library

Catherine Malabou

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Philosophy, Literature, Literary reference works
Length:
2,360 words

...upon plasticity. I. Between the Rise and Annihilation of Form: The Meanings of PlasticityPlasticity” articulates several meanings, and can thus be broken down into a series of equivalents that never retain more than one characteristic. “Malleability” and Bildsamkeit qualify the simple register of receptivity to form. “Formation,” “information,” Einbildung , and Durchbildung emphasize only the process of giving form. To be sure, one of the essential aspects of plasticity is indeed its receptiveness to impression: the word “plasticity” designates...

neuronal plasticity

neuronal plasticity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biomedicine (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...neuronal plasticity The change in properties of nerve cells as a result of new input. May involve production of new processes, establishing new synapses or altering the strength of existing synapses. See long-term potentiation ; synaptic plasticity...

plasticity index

plasticity index   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... index ( PI ) The range of moisture content over which the soil remains in a plastic...

synaptic plasticity

synaptic plasticity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biomedicine (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...synaptic plasticity Changes in the properties of synapses, thought to be important in learning and memory. Small changes in the efficiency of a synapse, brought about by modifying the release of neurotransmitter or the number of receptors on the postsynaptic cell, can alter the properties of a neuronal circuit. See also neuronal plasticity...

phenotypic plasticity

phenotypic plasticity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...plasticity The capacity of a phenotype to vary, owing to environmental influences on the genotype (e.g. in the shape of a plant or the colour of its...

plasticity theory

plasticity theory   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Mechanical Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...plasticity theory The mathematical analysis of the plastic flow of materials. See also flow rules ; forming ; Geiringer’s equations ; Hencky equations ; plastic design ; plastic hinge ; plastic potential...

phenotypic plasticity

phenotypic plasticity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Genetics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
31 words

...plasticity a phenomenon in which a given genotype may develop different states for a character or group of characters in different environments; genotype–environment interaction ( q.v. ). See norm of reaction...

phenotypic plasticity

phenotypic plasticity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biology (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
155 words

...phenotypic plasticity The ability of an organism to adapt to changes in its environment by modifying its own development, form, behaviour, or other trait. Hence it depends on the capacity for a given genotype to respond to environmental factors and to adjust the phenotype accordingly. Plasticity is of great selective advantage in an unstable or unpredictable environment and can itself be inherited and evolve. Plants typically have marked phenotypic plasticity, showing considerable variation in, among other characters, mature height, seed number, and seed mass...

Phenotypic Plasticity

Phenotypic Plasticity   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Evolution

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

.... “ Adaptive Plasticity and Plasticity as an Adaptation: A Selective Review of Plasticity in Animal Morphology and Life History. ” Oikos 74 (1995): 3–17. Nijhout, H. F. “ Control Mechanisms of Polyphenic Development in Insects. ” BioScience 49 (1999): 181–192. A masterful review of mechanisms of genetic, developmental, and environmental control of polyphenisms. Scheiner, S. M. “ Genetics and Evolution of Phenotypic Plasticity. ” Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 24 (1993): 35–68. Covers the genetic basis of plasticity, how plasticity evolves, and...

phenotypic plasticity

phenotypic plasticity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Zoology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
99 words

...plasticity The ability of a particular genotype to produce different phenotypes , sometimes in response to an environmental change. There are many examples. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans ordinarily lays eggs, but when food is scarce, the eggs hatch inside the mother and consume her from inside. Tadpoles of American spadefoot toads ( Scaphiopodidae ) usually feed on algae, small crustaceans, and detritus, but when larger crustaceans are present the tadpoles have much larger jaw muscles and serrated mouthparts. Fish feeding on hard-shelled prey...

cell plasticity

cell plasticity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Genetics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
143 words

...plasticity the ability of a differentiated cell to change its fate to that of an embryonic cell type or a different cell type in response to a new extracellular or intracellular environment. For example, serial transplantation of genital imaginal discs of Drosophila pupae, when transplanted into the abdomen of the adult fly, have been shown to give rise to leg or head structures, and differentiated somatic cells can be induced to assume an embryonic stem cell-like state by experimental introduction of specific transcription factors. See Appendix C ,...

synaptic plasticity

synaptic plasticity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biology (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
363 words

...synaptic plasticity ( neuronal plasticity ) Change in the efficacy or connections of the junctions (synapses) between neurons in the nervous system. It is a crucial process that underlies modification of an animal’s behaviour during development and in response to previous activity or experience, including learning and memory. Various mechanisms produce changes in the efficacy of synapses, which can range in duration from fractions of a second to days or weeks. For example, the arrival of impulses in rapid succession at a motor end plate causes an augmented...

phenotypic plasticity

phenotypic plasticity   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Animal Behaviour (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
65 words

...plasticity The ability of a genotype to produce more than one phenotype in response to exposure to certain environmental conditions. For example, there may be morphological changes in the bones of mammals as a result of load or of changes in diet, there may be physiological changes in response to changes in diet, and there may be behavioural changes as a result of * learning...

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