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Curie, Pierre

Curie, Pierre   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Scientists

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology
Length:
513 words

..., Pierre (1859–1906) French physicist Pierre Curie was the son of a Paris physician. He was educated at the Sorbonne where he became an assistant in 1878 . In 1882 he was made laboratory chief at the School of Industrial Physics and Chemistry where he remained until he was appointed professor of physics at the Sorbonne in 1904 . In 1895 he married Marie Skłodowska , with whom he conducted research into the radioactivity of radium and with whom he shared the Nobel Prize for physics in 1903 . His scientific career falls naturally into two periods,...

Pierre Curie

Pierre Curie (1859–1906)   Reference library

Francis Crick

Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
145 words

...Pierre Curie 1859 – 1906 French physicist It can even be thought that radium could become very dangerous in criminal hands, and here the question can be raised whether mankind benefits from knowing the secrets of Nature, whether it is ready to profit from it or whether this knowledge will not be harmful for it. The example of the discoveries of Nobel is characteristic, as powerful explosives have enabled man to do wonderful work. They are also a terrible means of destruction in the hands of great criminals who lead the peoples towards war. I am one of...

Curie, Pierre

Curie, Pierre (1859–1906)   Reference library

The New Oxford Dictionary for Scientific Writers and Editors (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

..., Pierre ( 1859–1906 ) French physicist , husband of Marie Curie . * curie Curie's law Curie temperature (or point ) Symbol: T C Curie–Weiss law (en dash)...

Curie's law

Curie's law  

The susceptibility (χ) of a paramagnetic substance is proportional to the thermodynamic temperature (T), i.e. χ = C/T, where C is the Curie constant. A modification of this law, the Curie-Weiss law, ...
Curie point

Curie point  

The temperature at which a ferromagnetic substance loses its ferromagnetism and becomes only paramagnetic. For iron the Curie point is 760°C and for nickel 356°C. It is named after Pierre Curie.
Irène Joliot-Curie

Irène Joliot-Curie  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1897–1956)French physicist who, in collaboration with her husband, Frédéric Joliot-Curie (1900–58), discovered artificial radioactivity. For this they were awarded the 1935 Nobel Prize for ...
André Louis Debierne

André Louis Debierne  

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Overview Page
(1874–1949) French chemistBorn in Paris, France, Debierne was educated at the Ecole de Physique et Chemie. After graduation he worked at the Sorbonne and as an assistant to Pierre and Marie Curie, ...
Marie Curie

Marie Curie  

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Overview Page
(1867–1934)Polish-born French chemist. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize and the first person to win two Nobel Prizes. She shared the 1903 prize with her husband, the physicist Pierre ...
piezoelectricity

piezoelectricity  

An electric charge induced by a flow of electrons when pressure is applied at the ends of a polar axis of a crystal which lacks a centre of symmetry (see crystal symmetry) and which has different ...
Antoine Henri Becquerel

Antoine Henri Becquerel  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1852–1908) French physicist.His early researches were in optics; then, in 1896, he accidentally discovered radioactivity in fluorescent salts of uranium. Three years later he showed that it consists ...
Curie point

Curie point   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Physics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Physics
Length:
37 words

...Curie point ( Curie temperature ) The temperature at which a ferromagnetic substance loses its ferromagnetism and becomes only paramagnetic. For iron the Curie point is 760°C and for nickel 356°C. It is named after Pierre Curie...

Curie point

Curie point   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Chemistry (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Science and technology, Chemistry
Length:
38 words

... point ( Curie temperature ) The temperature at which a ferromagnetic substance loses its ferromagnetism and becomes only paramagnetic. For iron the Curie point is 760°C and for nickel 356°C. It is named after Pierre Curie...

Curie’s law

Curie’s law   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Physics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Physics
Length:
89 words

...Curie’s law The susceptibility ( χ ‎) of a paramagnetic substance is proportional to the thermodynamic temperature ( T ), i.e. χ ‎= C / T , where C is the Curie constant. A modification of this law, the Curie–Weiss law , is more generally applicable. It states that χ ‎= C /( T − θ ‎), where θ ‎ is the Weiss constant, a characteristic of the material. The law was first proposed by Pierre Curie in 1895 and modified by another French physicist, Pierre-Ernest Weiss ( 1865–1940 ), in...

Curie-Weiss law

Curie-Weiss law   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...-Weiss law A law that describes the magnetic susceptibility ( X ) of a ferromagnet ( see ferromagnetism ) at temperatures above the Curie temperature . X = C /( T − θ ) where C is a constant for each material, T is the temperature in kelvins, and θ is the Curie temperature in kelvins. The law was formulated by the French physicists Pierre Curie ( 1859–1906 ) and Pierre-Ernest Weiss ( 1865–1940...

Curie’s law

Curie’s law   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Chemistry (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Science and technology, Chemistry
Length:
89 words

...’s law The susceptibility ( χ ‎) of a paramagnetic substance is proportional to the thermodynamic temperature ( T ), i.e. χ ‎ = C / T , where C is the Curie constant. A modification of this law, the Curie-Weiss law , is more generally applicable. It states that χ ‎ = C /( T – θ ‎), where θ ‎ is the Weiss constant, a characteristic of the material. The law was first proposed by Pierre Curie in 1895 and modified by another French physicist, Pierre-Ernest Weiss ( 1865–1940 ), in 1907...

Joliot-Curie, Irène

Joliot-Curie, Irène (1897–1956)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Physics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Physics
Length:
63 words

...Joliot-Curie, Irène ( 1897–1956 ) French physicist , daughter of Marie and Pierre Curie , who was educated by her mother and her scientist associates. In 1921 she began work at the Radium Institute, becoming director in 1946 . In 1926 she married Frédéric Joliot ( 1900–58 ). They shared the 1935 Nobel Prize for chemistry for their discovery of artificial radioactivity the previous...

Joliot-Curie, Irène

Joliot-Curie, Irène (1897–1956)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Chemistry (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Science and technology, Chemistry
Length:
63 words

...Curie, Irène ( 1897–1956 ) French physicist , daughter of Marie and Pierre Curie , who was educated by her mother and her scientist associates. In 1921 she began work at the Radium Institute, becoming director in 1946 . In 1926 she married Frédéric Joliot ( 1900–58 ). They shared the 1935 Nobel Prize for chemistry for their discovery of artificial radioactivity the previous...

Joliot-Curie, Irène

Joliot-Curie, Irène (1897–1956)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Chemical Engineering

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...Joliot-Curie, Irène ( 1897–1956 ) A French scientist and daughter of Marie and Pierre Curie. She gained her doctorate at the Sorbonne in 1920 having first served as a nurse during the the First World War. She became Doctor of Science in 1925, having presented a thesis on the alpha rays of polonium. She is noted for her work on natural and artificial radioactivity working together with her husband Jean Frédéric Joliot-Curie ( 1900–58 ). She shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry with him in 1935 in recognition of the synthesis of new radioactive...

Curie, Marie

Curie, Marie (1867–1934)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Chemistry (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Science and technology, Chemistry
Length:
96 words

..., Marie ( Marya Sklodowska ; 1867–1934 ) Polish -born French chemist , who went to Paris in 1891 . She married the physicist Pierre Curie ( 1859–1906 ) in 1895 and soon began work on seeking radioactive elements other than uranium in pitchblende (to account for its unexpectedly high radioactivity). By 1898 she had discovered radium and polonium , although it took her four years to purify them. In 1903 the Curies shared the Nobel Prize for physics with Henri Becquerel , who had discovered radioactivity. In 1911 Marie Curie was awarded...

Curie, Marie

Curie, Marie (1867–1934)   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
117 words

..., Marie ( 1867–1934 ) Polish scientist who specialized in work on radiation . Marie and her husband Pierre Curie ( 1859–1906 ) (who specialized in the electrical and magnetic properties of crystals) worked together on a series of radiation experiments. In 1898 , they discovered radium and polonium . In 1903 , they shared the Nobel Prize in physics with A. H. Becquerel . In 1911 , Marie became the first person to be awarded a second Nobel Prize (this time for chemistry), for her work on radium and its compounds. She died of leukaemia caused by...

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