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Perpendicular architecture

Perpendicular architecture   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
78 words

... architecture The last of the Gothic styles of the Middle Ages and the only one to be peculiarly English. The east window of Gloucester Cathedral is an early example, pre‐dating the Black Death . The style remained popular for another 200 years, until the Reformation . It is distinguished by the straight mullions of the windows, by ranges of clerestory windows surmounted by battlements and pinnacles, and by splendid towers. See J. H. Harvey , The Perpendicular Style, 1330–1485 ...

Perpendicular architecture

Perpendicular architecture   Reference library

T. E. Faulkner

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
449 words

... architecture was the last, great, culminating phase of Gothic architecture in England, so called because of the vertical lines of its window tracery and the similar effect of panelling, executed in stone, covering wall surfaces. Complex and decorative, it also makes use of the ‘four-centred’ arch, allowing extended, sometimes enormous, window apertures. Ever more intricate ‘stellar’, ‘fan’, and ultimately ‘pendant’ vaulting systems are also typical. So distinctively English was this style, and of such longevity ( c. 1350–1550 ), that the term...

Perpendicular architecture

Perpendicular architecture   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
45 words

... architecture . The last of the Gothic styles of the Middle Ages and the only one to be peculiarly English. The style is distinguished by the straight mullions of the windows, by ranges of clerestorey windows surmounted by battlements and pinnacles, and by splendid towers...

Historic Churches

Historic Churches   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,420 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Herefordshire has a number of sturdy timber‐framed towers, e.g. at Bromsbarrow. The finest group of Perpendicular towers are those erected in oolitic limestone in Somerset. Towers of this period can often be dated closely by bequests in wills, though they normally took many years to complete. The fashion for building towers in the Perpendicular style continued long after the Reformation. Spires were introduced in the Early English period of Gothic architecture and were sometimes added to earlier towers. They are a particular feature of the band of oolitic...

angel light

angel light  

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Small, roughly triangular light between subordinate arched window-tracery, especially in Perpendicular work.
running

running  

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Term describing anything linked in a smooth continuous progression or repeating asymmetrical flowing motifs, set on a band, each apparently leaning to one side or the other. Types of running ornament ...
label

label  

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1 Hood-moulding extending horizontally across the top of a late-Gothic Perpendicular or Tudor aperture, returning downwards vertically on each side and terminating in label-stops, often elaborately ...
Free Tudor

Free Tudor  

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Style in which late-Perpen-dicular, Tudor, or Elizabethan forms were mingled in a free manner in the late C19 and early C20, e.g. the work of Leonard Stokes.
mitre-head

mitre-head  

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Type of ogee-headed bulbous top of a pinnacle or turret of late Perpendicular Tudor Gothic, as in Henry VII's Chapel at Westminster Abbey, London. The name is derived from its resemblance to a ...
Edmund More

Edmund More  

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(fl. 1523–d. 1536).English Freemason. Between 1523 and 1533 he worked on Bishop West's exquisite Chantry Chapel in Ely Cathedral, Cambs., a sumptuous work in which late-Perpendicular Gothic and early ...
Robert Everard

Robert Everard  

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(fl. 1440–85).English master-mason. He seems to have succeeded James Woderofe at Norwich Cathedral c.1453, where he designed the stone spire and the nave vault (c. 1463–72). His Perpendicular lierne ...
John Clyve

John Clyve  

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(fl. 1362–92).English mason. He worked at Windsor Castle, Berks. (1362–3), and was master-mason of Worcester Cathedral Priory (1366–7). He was probably responsible for the tower, north porch, ...
scraped

scraped  

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1 See sgraffito.2 Building from which all additions have been removed. The term was current during the Gothic Revival when over-enthusiastic ‘restorers’ would remove virtually everything so that a ...
Alexander Marshall Mackenzie

Alexander Marshall Mackenzie  

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(1848–1933).Scots architect. He practised with James Matthews (1820–98) in Aberdeen from 1877, designing Greyfriars Church (1906) and the Marischal College (1904–6) in that city, the latter an ...
John Croxton

John Croxton  

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(fl. 1411–47).English mason. He worked at Guildhall, London, in 1411, when that structure was begun, and was associated with it for most of his career. He was undoubtedly the architect, and the crypt ...
pampre

pampre  

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1 Representation of vine-stems with grapes, often found draped in spirals around columns, suggesting the twisted Trajanic or Solomonic form.2 Grapes, leaves, and vine-stems as running undercut ...
pointed

pointed  

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1 Rough masonry finish made by a pick or pointing tool, with a picked face (i.e. with only the coarsest projections removed) also called pecking.2 Type of arch.3 With a capital P, ‘Pointed’ refers to ...
Perpendicular

Perpendicular  

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Denoting the latest stage of English Gothic church architecture, prevalent from the late 14th to mid 16th centuries and characterized by broad arches, elaborate fan vaulting, and large windows with ...
Segar Owen

Segar Owen  

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(1874–1929).English architect. He was articled to and later (1896) was in partnership with his father, William Owen (1850–1910), architect, of Warrington, Ches. In 1895–6 he worked with G. E. Street. ...
Tudor architecture

Tudor architecture  

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The Tudor monarchy (1485–1603) is not associated with architecture in the same way as Georgian or Queen Anne, though there is notable work at the beginning (see perpendicular) and the end (see ...

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