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Overview

Perpendicular

Denoting the latest stage of English Gothic church architecture, prevalent from the late 14th to mid 16th centuries and characterized by broad arches, elaborate fan vaulting, and large ...

perpendicular

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A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... 1. At right angles to another object, for example, a perpendicular joint is at 90° to the horizontal mortar bed in a wall. 2. Something that stands vertical to the ground, is at 90° to the...

perpendicular

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Mathematics (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... At right angles to one another. Can be of two lines, two planes, a line and a plane, or a line and a...

Perpendicular

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
144 words

... The last of the English Gothic styles of architecture, it developed in the 14th century and survived until as late as the early 17th. It is characterized by straight verticals and horizontals, especially in tracery . There is overall emphasis on the panel motif, both in tracery and in blank-wall decoration. Arches are flat and vaulting complex (culminating in the English fan pattern). One of the most important early Perpendicular structures is the chancel of Gloucester Cathedral, while from the middle period of the style there are the ...

Perpendicular

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Patrick Goode and Anthony Quiney

The Oxford Companion to Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
333 words

... The last style of English Gothic , flourishing from the middle of the 14th century, and characterized by the repetition of vertical traceried panels, large windows, wide light interiors, and vaults decorated with liernes and tiercerons . Nowhere better exemplifies the effectiveness of this essentially repetitive form than the choir of Gloucester Cathedral ( c .1337–57 ), whose Norman structure hides behind a grid of tall rectangles with foiled tracery that rise up to a new vault, webbed with liernes and tiercerons, punctuated by carved...

Perpendicular

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A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
597 words
Illustration(s):
1

... Third and latest of the English Gothic architectural styles, also known as Third Pointed or Rectilinear , it followed from the previous Decorated or Second-Pointed style. Perp. first emerged in designs of c. 1332 for the chapter-house and cloisters of old St Paul’s Cathedral, London (destroyed), by William de Ramsey , and was further developed at Gloucester Cathedral, where the chancel ( c. 1337–57) displays many of its attributes. An English style, it has no Continental, Irish, or Scottish equivalent, and survived for more than three...

perpendicular bisector

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Mathematics (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... bisector The perpendicular bisector of a line segment AB is the straight line perpendicular to AB through the midpoint of AB...

perpendicular planes

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Mathematics (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... planes Two planes in 3‐dimensional space are perpendicular if normals to the two planes are perpendicular. If n 1 and n 2 are vectors normal to the planes, this is so if n 1 . n 2...

common perpendicular

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Mathematics (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...perpendicular Let l 1 and l 2 be two straight lines in space that do not intersect and are not parallel. The common perpendicular of l 1 and l 2 is the straight line that meets both lines and is perpendicular to...

perpendicular style

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A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... style Gothic architecture that is exaggerated by vertical straight and slender aspects such as windows and...

perpendicular distance

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Mathematics (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Mathematics and Computer Science
Length:
46 words
Illustration(s):
1

... distance The distance from a point to a line or plane measured along the line perpendicular to the line or plane which passes through the given point. It will be the shortest distance between the point and any given point on the line or...

perpendicular lines

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Mathematics (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... lines In coordinate geometry of the plane, a useful necessary and sufficient condition that two lines, with gradients m 1 and m 2 , are perpendicular is that m 1 m 2 =−1. (This is taken to include the cases when m 1 =0 and m 2 is infinite, and vice...

perpendicular style

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
34 words

... style Final period of English Gothic architecture, from c .1330 to the mid-16th century. Named after the strong vertical lines of its window tracery and panelling, characteristic features are fan vaulting and flattened...

Perpendicular architecture

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The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
79 words

... architecture The last of the Gothic styles of the Middle Ages and the only one to be peculiarly English. The east window of Gloucester Cathedral is an early example, pre‐dating the Black Death . The style remained popular for another 200 years, until the Reformation . It is distinguished by the straight mullions of the windows, by ranges of clerestory windows surmounted by battlements and pinnacles, and by splendid towers. See J. H. Harvey , The Perpendicular Style, 1330–1485 ...

Perpendicular architecture

Perpendicular architecture   Reference library

T. E. Faulkner

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
449 words

...dates from the Perpendicular period, but many 14th- and 15th-cent. parish churches, especially in wool-rich East Anglia, exemplify the richness of this architecture; so too do the royal chapels of St George, Windsor ( 1475–1528 ), and of Henry VII , Westminster abbey (begun 1503 ), and, on a smaller scale, the numerous late Gothic chantries and tombs often inserted into earlier ecclesiastical buildings. The Divinity School, Oxford ( 1424–83 ), with its remarkable pendant-vaulted roof, is another excellent example. Quintessentially Perpendicular is King’s...

Perpendicular style

Perpendicular style   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Northern Renaissance Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
1,123 words

...Unlike the Decorated style, Perpendicular required uniformity, the predominant use of straight lines and avoidance of obvious curves, especially the ogee. Some Perpendicular characteristics are adumbrated in Decorated buildings: the Lady Chapel (1321–49) at Ely Cathedral, for example, has a proto-Perpendicular grid system inherent in the tracery–dado arcade relationship, yet the profusion of sculpture, the plasticity of the wall and the kaleidoscopic colour tones remain essentially Decorated. Initially Perpendicular was restricted to London and...

perpendicular style

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
71 words

... style [De] A style of architecture found in Britain in the late 14th century ad through to the 16th century ad in which there is a strong emphasis on the vertical elements of construction and decoration. Pointed arches common in earlier centuries are flattened and arches and windows become framed by rectangular outlines. Towers of great height are added to ecclesiastical buildings and ceilings and roofs are often richly...

Perpendicular architecture

Perpendicular architecture   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
45 words

... architecture . The last of the Gothic styles of the Middle Ages and the only one to be peculiarly English. The style is distinguished by the straight mullions of the windows, by ranges of clerestorey windows surmounted by battlements and pinnacles, and by splendid towers...

Perpendicular style

Perpendicular style   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
1,289 words
Illustration(s):
1

...Peterborough Cathedral. Perpendicular grew from the same roots as the Decorated style , with which it shared the love of the minuscule, with tight moulded bases, bundles of diminutive mouldings, and complex pattern-making. Unlike the Decorated style, Perpendicular required uniformity, the predominant use of straight lines and avoidance of obvious curves, especially the ogee. Some Perpendicular characteristics are adumbrated in Decorated buildings: the Lady Chapel ( 1321–49 ) at Ely Cathedral, for example, has a proto-Perpendicular grid system inherent in...

perpendicular axis theorem

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Mathematics (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... axis theorem The following theorem about moments of inertia of a lamina : Theorem Suppose that a rigid body is in the form of a lamina lying in the plane z =0. Let I 0x , I 0y and I 0z be the moments of inertia of the body about the three coordinate axes. Then I 0z = I 0x + I 0y...

perpendicular-axes theorem

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A Dictionary of Mechanical Engineering

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...-axes theorem 1. If I x and I y are the mass moments of inertia of a rigid plane lamina about any pair of orthogonal axes in its plane, then the mass moment of inertia I z about the z -axis (the polar moment of inertia ) is given by I z = I x + I y . 2. If I x and I y are the second moments of area of a rigid plane lamina about any pair of orthogonal axes in its plane, then the second moment of area J about the z -axis (the polar second moment of area ) is given by J = I x + I y . See also parallel-axes theorem...

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