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Paul Nadar

(1856–1939), French photographer, son of Félix Nadar, whose studio he inherited. Known for his inventive approach to photography, he became famous after collaborating with his ...

Nadar, Paul

Nadar, Paul (1856–1939)   Reference library

Kelley E. Wilder

The Oxford Companion to the Photograph

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
118 words

..., Paul ( 1856–1939 ), French photographer , son of Félix Nadar , whose studio he inherited. Known for his inventive approach to photography, he became famous after collaborating with his father in interviewing the chemist Chevreul on his 100th birthday, 31 August 1886 . Paul photographed Félix interviewing Chevreul, combining the photographs not only with transcriptions of the dialogue, but with a sound recording using Clément Ader's ( 1841–1925 ) phonophone. It was published in Le Journal illustré on 5 September 1886 , with twelve...

Paul Nadar

Paul Nadar  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1856–1939), French photographer,son of Félix Nadar, whose studio he inherited. Known for his inventive approach to photography, he became famous after collaborating with his father in interviewing ...
photo-essay

photo-essay  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Occasionally, photographers have captured a single event in sequential form: for example, Paul Nadar's photographs of the interview between the centenarian chemist Chevreul and Félix Nadar (1886), ...
Nadar

Nadar  

Reference type:
Overview Page
1820–1910), French photographer,and a central figure in the extraordinary expansion of photography in the mid‐19th century. An exact contemporary of Charles Nègre and Gustave Le Gray, this son of ...
Salon de l'Escalier

Salon de l'Escalier  

Reference type:
Overview Page
An exhibition of modern photography and its precursors in the stairway gallery of the Théâtre des Champs‐Élysées, Paris, in May–June 1928. It was organized by the editor of L'Art vivant ...
Nadar

Nadar (1820–1910)   Reference library

Sylvie Aubenas

The Oxford Companion to the Photograph

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
538 words

...the 1870s, his son Paul , became more commercial and conventional. Portraits were reduced to the carte de visite format and sitters, more and more of whom were actresses, were less carefully chosen. Fascinated by scientific progress, Nadar was also a pioneer in the field of aerial photography ( 1858 ) and photography by artificial light ( 1861 in the Paris catacombs, 1864–5 in the sewers). His main interest in the 1860s was aerial navigation, and he put much time and money into a balloon aptly named Le Géant . After the 1870s Nadar no longer played a...

detective camera

detective camera   Reference library

Kelley E. Wilder

The Oxford Companion to the Photograph

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
234 words

...glasses, hats, books, watches, picnic hampers, ties, and canes. They sported names as suggestive as their looks, the ‘Demon Detective Camera’, the ‘Ticka’ watch camera, the ‘Express Détective Nadar’ (sold by Paul Nadar ), the ‘Photo‐Binocular’, the ‘Photo‐revolver de Poche’, and the ‘Concealed Vest camera’. Not only amateurs but professionals like Paul Martin and Paul Strand sometimes used disguised cameras. In the 20th century specialist cameras, usually in the so‐called sub‐miniature format, were produced in various countries for police or espionage...

photo‐essay

photo‐essay   Reference library

Amanda Hopkinson and Robin Lenman

The Oxford Companion to the Photograph

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
496 words

.... Occasionally, photographers have captured a single event in sequential form: for example, Paul Nadar 's photographs of the interview between the centenarian chemist Chevreul and Félix Nadar ( 1886 ), Brassaï 's A Man Dies in the Street, Boulevard de la Glacière ( 1932 ), and Arthur Codfod's pictures of the Hindenburg disaster ( 1937 ). But the term photo‐essay implies something more extended, structured, and multifaceted: the exploration by one (usually) or more photographers of an issue, place, or social situation in a more or less...

Impressionism

Impressionism   Reference library

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
562 words

...artists sought out exhibition opportunities outside the official Salons. The term “Impressionism” first appeared in a critical review that described the “unfinished” quality of the paintings displayed at an independent exhibition held at the former studio of the photographer Nadar in Paris in 1874 , which included Monet's Impression, Sunrise ( 1872 ; Musée Marmotan, Paris). By 1877 , however, the group itself had adopted the name. Impressionism emerged in France during the Third Republic, a period of rapid modernization and industrialization, which...

literature and photography

literature and photography   Reference library

Jane M. Rabb

The Oxford Companion to the Photograph

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
1,900 words

...Carlyle and Ralph Emerson , pondered photography's capabilities and implications; others— Théophile Gautier in Spain ( 1840 ), Maxime Du Camp , accompanied by Gustave Flaubert , in Egypt ( 1849–50 )—tested them pragmatically. Literary admirers like George Sand encouraged Nadar 's aerial and underground photography experiments in Paris. At the same time, literary realism flourished. Photography set a standard of veracity, while suggesting new ways of viewing and representing reality. Émile Zola (himself a keen photographer) emulated the camera's...

Impressionism

Impressionism   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Western Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
1,349 words

...first group show. The Franco-Prussian War and the Commune of 1870–1 were especially disruptive and the recession of 1873 meant that the future Impressionist painters lost the support of the dealer Paul Durand-Ruel ( 1831–1922 ) who had dealt mainly in Barbizon landscapes in the 1860s. Their first show was held in the studio of the photographer Nadar on the Boulevard des Capucines from 15 April to 15 May 1874, and was described as the Société Anonyme des Artistes, Peintres, Sculpteurs, et Graveurs. That is, despite Camille Pissarro 's recommendation...

African Biblical Interpretation

African Biblical Interpretation   Reference library

Musa W. Dube

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Biblical Interpretation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
6,140 words

... 2004 ). Given the proliferation of Pentecostal churches and their influence on women’s lives, the construction of Pentecostal feminist ways of reading the Bible are being articulated ( Nadar 2005 ). One area that needs attention in the gendered African Bible is the articulation of Queer African biblical interpretations. Some work toward this end has already begun. Paul Germond explores the six problematic biblical texts ( Gen. 19:1–29 ; Lev. 18:22 , 20:13 ; Rom. 1:18–32 ; 1 Cor. 6:9 and 1 Tim. 1:8–11 ) concerning homosexuality, problematizes...

portraiture

portraiture   Reference library

Colin Ford

The Oxford Companion to the Photograph

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
3,302 words

...focus and imperfections in her developing and printing technique, give her portraits a life and immediacy which has never quite been surpassed. In France, meanwhile, one professional portraitist achieved something of Cameron's close‐up impact. The head‐and‐shoulder portraits of Nadar use light almost as dramatically as hers. In due course, he adopted electric lighting, which he could control more precisely than daylight, and his portraits are smoother and more technically proficient than Cameron's. However, they often lack the immediacy and dramatic impact of...

Photography

Photography   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
6,510 words

...of the arch. To appreciate the scope of Nadar's achievement here, both in terms of artistry and dance information, one should consult other contemporary images of Livry, especially those of her in her Herculaneum costume, such as Disdéri's photographic portrait and the placid lithograph by Marie-Alexandre Alophe . Nadar photographed other dancers, among them Mistinguett (Jenne-Marie Bourgeois), Marie Petipa (Marius's first wife), and La Goulue ( Louise Weber ) in a split. During the 1850s, Nadar's brother, Adrien Tournachon , also made several...

Intersectional Studies

Intersectional Studies   Reference library

Marianne Bjelland Kartzow

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Gender Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
4,147 words

...oppression parameters are connected and identities are constructed by complex intersections of social categories—has been vibrant in feminist biblical interpretation for several decades, as for example articulated by the Hebrew Bible scholar Sarojini Nadar: “racism is sexism is classism is homophobia” ( Nadar, 2009 , p. 226). What Is Intersectionality? Within recent interdisciplinary research the concept of intersectionality has gained increasing currency. When white Western feminists in the 1960s and 1970s started to criticize male-centrism, their insights...

nude photography

nude photography   Reference library

Rolf Sachsse and Robin Lenman

The Oxford Companion to the Photograph

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
2,567 words

...gestures derived from painting and sculpture, and the studied simplicity of its settings, reduced the nude image's ambiguity to a minimum. Others who were well known in different fields did occasional nudes, either ( Le Secq , Nègre ) in connection with their own paintings, or ( Nadar , Le Gray ) to meet special requests from artists. Only a few photographers c. 1850– c. 1890 presented nudes as fully‐fledged works in their own right. An example was the London‐based Swede Oscar Gustav Rejlander , whose ambitious, large‐scale morality picture The Two Ways of...

Religious Regulation in France

Religious Regulation in France   Reference library

Paul Christopher Manuel

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Politics and Religion

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics, Religion
Length:
12,236 words

...less prominent place on Montmartre in 1926, and destroyed in 1941 by the proclerical Vichy collaborationist government. Most recently, in 2001, the Paris City Council voted to place a new statue of Chevalier Lefebvre de la Barre in Montmartre, close to the basilica at the Square Nadar. 15. There was a pro-Catholic political party in the Fourth Republic, known as the Popular Republican Movement ( Mouvement Républicain Populaire ), founded after the war to support Christian values. It was disbanded in 1967. 16. For more information, see Documentation...

Barthes, Roland

Barthes, Roland   Reference library

Mary Bittner Wiseman and Margaret Olin

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
7,126 words

... December 1978 to March 1979 . There were thirteen of them, each followed on the same day by seminars on “The Metaphor of the Labyrinth” led by guest speakers. The second set, “The Work as Will,” was to have been followed after its completion by seminars on photographs by Paul Nadar and archival material on Proust. But death intervened after the eleventh lecture on 23 February 1980 . Barthes was hit by a laundry truck as he was leaving the College de France on 25 February and died on 26 March. It is stunningly and achingly apt that Barthes should have...

Dance

Dance   Reference library

Francis Sparshott, Graham McFee, Mark Franko, Mark Franko, Erin Brannigan, and André Lepecki

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
20,754 words

...that has been largely overlooked in disciplinary accounts of dance studies is that with visual culture ( Soussloff and Franko, 2002 ). The analysis of twentieth-century dance relies on both live performance and traces of historical performance surviving in visual media. Nadar first photographed a dancer posed in costume in 1880 , and Edgar Degas photographed ballerinas in 1895 ( Betz, 2001 ). Betz attributes the first attempts to capture dance movement photographically, however, to Hugo Erfurth, who photographed Sent M’ahesa and Berta and Else...

French painting

French painting: c. 31,000 years ago - c. 1994  

Reference type:
Timeline
Current Version:
2012

...Hilaire Germain (19 July 1834) The Oxford Dictionary of Dance 2 19th century Painting Performing arts Dance French art Europe France 1874 1874 A group of French artists, including Renoir, Monet and Degas, exhibit their work independently in the Paris studio of the photographer Nadar Impressionism The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms 2 19th century Arts Painting French art Europe France 1874 1874 French critic Louis Leroy uses the term 'impressionism' to ridicule Monet's Impression, Sunrise , and unwittingly names a movement Monet, Claude (1840–1926)...

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