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Part 20 claim

Subject: Law

A claim other than a claim by the claimant against the defendant. It includes (1) a counterclaim by the defendant against the claimant; (2) a counterclaim by the defendant against a third ...

Cumberland

Cumberland  

Consisted of the western part of the Lake District, a surrounding coastal plain, and two outlying areas, a hilly district to the east towards Alston, and fertile lands north of Hadrian's Wall towards ...
Henry V

Henry V  

(1386/7–1422),king of England (1413–22). Eldest son of Henry IV and his first wife Mary Bohun, Henry was born at Monmouth, most probably on 9 August or 16 September 1386 or 1387. He was thrust into ...
Enoch Powell

Enoch Powell  

(b. Birmingham, 15 June 1912; d. London, 8 Feb. 1998)British; Minister of Health 1960–3 Powell's parents were teachers in Birmingham. He was educated at King Edward School, Birmingham, and Trinity ...
Grey Owl

Grey Owl (1888–1938)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
251 words

...to Canada. Apart from two years of service in England and France during the First World War, he lived in northern Ontario for the next 20 years. The Ojibwa of Temagami taught him their language and his first lessons in First Nations ways. In 1910 he married an Ojibwa woman, but a year later, lacking any model of a normal family, he abandoned her and their infant daughter. As early as 1912 he claimed to be part Aboriginal. Upon his discharge at the end of the war he returned to northern Ontario and, disgusted with ‘civilization’, continued to learn...

Verdon, de

Verdon, de   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
240 words

...who took part in Prince John 's expedition of 1185 and was left as John's seneschal on his departure. About 1189 Bertram was granted by John substantial lands in Co. Louth, to hold in return for providing the service of 20 knights. These lands came to include the baronies of Lower Dundalk (the Cooley peninsula), Upper Dundalk (in which the town of Dundalk is situated and which was the caput of the de Verdon lordship until the great castle at Roche was built in the mid‐13th century), and Ferrard; they also claimed lands in part of the modern Co....

Old Crow

Old Crow   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
183 words

...While Old Crow began as a settlement only around 1900 , Gwich'in peoples, part of the Athapaskan language group, have inhabited an area stretching from the lower Mackenzie River region in the Northwest Territories to the headwaters of the Koyukuk River in Alaska for centuries. Old Crow, population 284 in 2001 , represents the settling of much of the Vuntut Gwitchin and Takudh Gwich'in portions of the Gwich'in in permanent settlements, growing gradually through the first half of the 20th century. Before that time, family groups moved seasonally through their...

Federal Court of Canada

Federal Court of Canada   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
252 words

...The Exchequer Court was part of the federal court system set up in 1875 , along with the Supreme Court , and partly in competition with provincial courts . The Exchequer Court heard cases where the federal government was itself a party, such as revenue cases and claims for damages against government. Initially, the court had the same judges as the Supreme Court, but it became independent in 1887 . Its jurisdiction was also gradually enlarged—to maritime law and intellectual property in 1891 , for example. Through the 20th century, the business of the...

Cook, James

Cook, James (1728–79)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Australian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
438 words

...New Holland—did Cook claim possession. On 20 August 1770 he stood on the highest part of ‘Possession Island’, hoisted the British colours and, in the name of King George III , took possession of the whole eastern coast down to the 38th parallel ‘by the name of New South Wales’. The only concerns he expressed were about possible claims by the Dutch against George III . These rites of possession occurred near the end of the first of Cook's three incursions into the Pacific. The first (on the Endeavour , 1768–71 ) began as part of a global scientific...

Henry V

Henry V   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
525 words

...by the generous grants of taxation made by Parliament before the first campaign. The contemporary Agincourt carol commemorated the battle as a famous English victory. Henry did not at first claim the French throne but began by pressing for the implementation of the treaty of Calais of 1360 in which the French had ceded Aquitaine, and to which he added further claims to Normandy, Touraine, and Maine. It is not clear whether Henry really expected to gain his ends by diplomacy, for he had made extensive preparations for war. The subsequent campaigns for the...

philanthropy

philanthropy   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
679 words

...were to some extent also ‘public charities’, supported in part by grants from provincial governments. Philanthropy has rarely been entirely independent of government support. Whether through grants-in-aid or income tax exemptions, governments have endorsed the private donation of funds for social purposes. The 20th century saw a noticeable expansion in governments' contributions to the relief of poverty and the provision of health care. The wars of that century, both hot and cold, played a major part in creating need (disabled veterans , soldiers'...

Gaelic Athletic Association

Gaelic Athletic Association   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
441 words

...watched ‘imported games’, and all members of the police and armed forces, quietly dropped during the difficult 1890s, were reinstated during 1902–3 . The GAA was thus part of the ‘new nationalism’ of the years before 1916 . But it was also part of the sudden growth of organized spectator sport seen everywhere in the British Isles from the late 19th century. By the early 1900s attendances of 20,000 at the most important fixtures had become commonplace and entrance charges had replaced affiliation fees from clubs as the main source of revenue. Railway...

territorial waters

territorial waters   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
356 words

...One of the provisions of the 1982 agreement allowed coastal states to claim a 200-mile Exclusive Economic Zone. In 1977 , before the deal was ratified, Canada declared a 200-mile Exclusive Fishing Zone. While this gave Canada jurisdiction over most of the offshore fish stocks of the Atlantic coast, it did not include areas of the continental shelf outside the boundary (the ‘nose’ and ‘tail’ of the Grand Banks ; the Flemish Cap) where fish populations spent at least part of their lives, leaving them vulnerable to international fleets. By the...

patronage

patronage   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
410 words

...replaced them with their own followers. In British North America, such blatant practice was limited by the tradition of non-partisan public service that was part of Canada's British heritage. Nevertheless, when positions came open, the governing party's friends usually got them. Following reforms in Britain, Canada introduced the merit principle into the civil service in the first two decades of the 20th century. Competitive examinations and special skills were required for many posts, but differences among provinces persisted, with virtual spoils systems...

Nevada

Nevada   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latinos and Latinas in the United States

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
571 words

...map and survey the area. Nevada formed part of a region that was claimed by Spain in 1495 , though indigenous populations already inhabited the area. It became a territory of Mexico when Mexico gained its independence from Spain in 1821 . In the early to mid-1800s, the Old Spanish Trail was used as a major trading route for New Mexicans. The trail traversed the southern tip of Nevada; Las Vegas became an essential trade stop between Los Angeles and Santa Fe. Mexican travelers and Mexican goods formed an integral part of such trades. In 1859 , silver was...

historical societies

historical societies   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
552 words

...of its centenary in 1924 the society claimed to be ‘the senior learned society in the whole of the British Empire overseas’. This boast betrays the society's membership. Although a handful of French Canadians participated in the society's activities, its members were for the most part English-speaking. French-speaking intellectuals gravitated towards the Société St-Jean-Baptiste ( 1834 ) and the Institut canadien ( 1844 ). The tradition of two solitudes in historical societies continued throughout much of the 20th century. The patriotic surge following...

Fuda, Faraj ʿAli

Fuda, Faraj ʿAli (1945)   Reference library

Dictionary of African Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,422 words

...part of sharia has evolved in a period marked by power struggles, murder, social suffering, and corruption. Fuda distinguishes between Islam and Muslims: whereas the former is sacred and divine, the latter are mortal and can be wrong. Although in Islam there is a consensus regarding the integrity of the Rightly Guided Caliphs ( al-hulafa al-rashidun ), Fuda claims that they were sometimes politically motivated and sometimes wrong in their judgments. Fuda provides a historical review of the Muslims and draws from this several conclusions about the present:...

New France

New France   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
939 words

...Natchez, and in the 1740s by the Miamis. Repaired alliances were crucial to New France's early victories in the Seven Years' War, which overlapping claims to the Ohio Valley helped ignite. Ultimately, the unprecedented resources channelled into North America by William Pitt after 1757 prevailed. By the Treaty of Paris in 1763 , France ceded most of New France to Britain, reserving trans-Mississippian claims for Spain, and the small islands of St-Pierre and Miquelon for itself, thus retaining an enduring national stake in the valuable North Atlantic...

nationalist literary societies

nationalist literary societies   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,003 words

...the 19th century) these societies became the confederate clubs which made up the Young Ireland political organization, and some survived the suppression of the movement to operate as centres of nationalist activity thereafter. (The Young Ireland Society of early 20th‐century Tralee claimed to have existed continuously since the 1840s.) When the body of the Young Irelander T. B. MacManus was brought back to Ireland for burial as a Fenian political gesture and the corpse was refused admission to Dublin churches, it was waked in the hall of the ...

Carlyle, Thomas

Carlyle, Thomas (1795–1881)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Black British History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
547 words

...more widespread in Victorian Britain, against what he denounced as the ‘rosepink Sentimentalism’ which had seen a wide section of the British public concerned with the condition of the slaves in British colonies and help to secure their emancipation . Nearly 20 years later Carlyle took an active part in the controversy that followed the Morant Bay rebellion , as one of the most prominent supporters of Governor Eyre. Philip Nanton Carlyle, Thomas , Latter‐Day Pamphlets (1858)...

Joachim, Paulin

Joachim, Paulin (1931)   Reference library

Dictionary of African Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
691 words

...Joachim, Paulin ( 1931 – ), Beninese journalist and poet, was born in the Beninese capital of Cotonou on 20 September 1931 . After he attended primary and secondary schools in Benin—which was part of the French empire until its independence in 1960—Joachim then moved to France to continue his education. He enrolled in the law school at the Catholic University of Lyon. Like many other African intellectuals living in France in the 1950s, Joachim struggled to support himself and attend university. Ultimately, Joachim dropped out of law school due to his...

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