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Panaetius

(c.185–109 bc), Stoic philosopher (see stoicism) from Rhodes. He studied with Crates of Mallus at Pergamum and with the leaders of the Stoic school at Athens. He moved to Rome in ...

Panaetius

Panaetius   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
177 words

... ( c. 185–109 bc ), Stoic philosopher ( see stoicism ) from Rhodes . He studied with Crates of Mallus at Pergamum and with the leaders of the Stoic school at Athens. He moved to Rome in the 140s and became, like Polybius , part of the entourage of Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus . He accompanied Scipio on a long journey in the Mediterranean ( 140 / 139 ). It is said that he lived alternately in Rome and Athens. In 129 he became head of the school. He died in Athens in 109 . Panaetius seems to have been more open to the views of Plato and ...

Panaetius

Panaetius (c.185–109 bc)   Reference library

Brad Inwood

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
341 words

... ( c. 185–109 bc ) , son of Nicagoras ; a Stoic philosopher ( see stoicism ) from Rhodes . At some point he was made a priest of Poseidon Hippios at Lindus . From a noble family, he studied with Crates (3) of Mallus at Pergamum and with the leaders of the Stoic school at Athens, Diogenes (3) of Babylon and his successor Antipater (2) of Tarsus. He moved to Rome in the 140s and became, like Polybius (1) , part of the entourage of P. Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus . He accompanied Scipio on a major journey in the eastern Mediterranean (...

Panaetius

Panaetius   Quick reference

Brad Inwood

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
260 words

... ( c. 185–109 bc ), son of Nicagoras; a Stoic philosopher from Rhodes. At some point he was made a priest of Poseidon Hippios at Lindus. From a noble family, he studied with Crates of Mallus at Pergamum and with the leaders of the Stoic school at Athens, Diogenes of Babylon and his successor Antipater of Tarsus. He moved to Rome in the 140s and became, like Polybius , part of the entourage of Scipio Aemilianus . He accompanied Scipio on a major journey in the eastern Mediterranean (140/139). It is said that he lived alternately in Rome and Athens. In ...

Panae'tius

Panae'tius (c.185–109 bc)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
171 words

... (of Rhodes, c. 185–109 bc ) Greek Stoic philosopher ( see Stoicism ). In c. 144 he went to Rome and joined the circle of P. Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus , whom he accompanied on a mission to Egypt and Asia. After his return c. 138 he divided his time between Rome and Athens; in 129 he succeeded Antipater as head of the Stoic school in Athens, and there he died. He adapted Stoic doctrine to fit Roman ideals, dwelling on the active virtues of magnanimity and benevolence rather than the passive virtues of indifference to misfortune and...

Panaetius of Rhodes

Panaetius of Rhodes (c.185–109)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Philosophy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
120 words

... of Rhodes ( c .185–109 bc ) Panaetius was head of the Stoa from 129 bc until his death. He was a companion of the general Scipio Aemilianus and accompanied him to the east. His views were mainly ethical, diluting Stoicism with enough Aristotelianism to make it suitable for the Roman world in which he moved: as well as the stoical virtues of fortitude and justice we should aim for some of the more magnificent traits appropriate to the great-souled man . Panaetius also held the modern-sounding view that there are several personae or...

Panaetius

Panaetius  

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(c.185–109 bc),Stoic philosopher (see stoicism) from Rhodes. He studied with Crates of Mallus at Pergamum and with the leaders of the Stoic school at Athens. He moved to Rome in the 140s and became, ...
Hecaton

Hecaton  

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Of Rhodes, Stoic (see Stoicism), pupil of Panaetius, wrote mainly on ethics and was, after Panaetius and Posidonius (2), the most influential Stoic of the ‘middle Stoic’ period. His works ...
Fannius Gaius

Fannius Gaius  

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(RE 7),Roman politician. Son-in-law of C. Laelius (2) and pupil of Panaetius, he became tribune (?130s bc), praetor (?126), and was then elected consul for 122 with the backing ...
Diogenes

Diogenes  

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Of Babylon (c. 240–152 bc), succeeded Zeno (3) of Tarsus as head of the Stoa (see Stoicism). His visit to Rome in 156–155 stimulated interest in Stoicism. Panaetius was his ...
Antipater

Antipater  

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Of Tarsus (2nd cent. bc), Stoic, succeeded Diogenes (3) of Babylon as head of the Stoa at Athens, and taught Panaetius. His basic positions differed little from those of Chrysippus ...
Gaius Laelius

Gaius Laelius  

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(c.190–after 129bc),closest friend of Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus. He became involved with the embassy of Athenian philosophers (155), esp. the Stoic Diogenēs, and with Panaetius, whose work he was ...
Lindus

Lindus  

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Was the most important of the three independent Dorian cities of Rhodes until the synoecism with Ialysus and Camirus created the federal Rhodian state in 408/7 bc. The city occupies ...
Scipionic Circle

Scipionic Circle  

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Is a term used to describe P. Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus and his friends, who were considered to be a group sharing the same cultural and even political outlook. The concept ...
Rutilius Rufus, Publius

Rutilius Rufus, Publius  

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B. c.160 bc, studied philosophy under Panaetius (becoming a firm Stoic), law under Mucius Scaevola (becoming an expert jurist), and oratory under Sulpicius Galba (without becoming an effective ...
Cornēlius Scīpiō Aemiliānus Africānus (Numantīnus), Publius

Cornēlius Scīpiō Aemiliānus Africānus (Numantīnus), Publius  

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B. 185/4 bc as second son of Aemilius Paullus (2), adopted as a child by Cornelius Scipio, son of Cornelius Scipio Africanus. In 168 he fought under Paullus at Pydna. Back in Rome, he met Polybius, ...
Aristarchus

Aristarchus  

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Of Samothrace (c.216–144 bc), sat at the feet of Aristophanes of Byzantium at Alexandria. He became head of the Alexandrian Library c.153. On the accession of Ptolemy VIII (145) he left Alexandria ...
Posidonius

Posidonius  

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[Na]Philosopher and historian, born c.135 bc in Apamea, Syria, but afterwards settling in Rhodes. His principal work, a History, occupied 52 books but is no longer extant. Fragments do, however, ...
Scipio Aemilianus

Scipio Aemilianus  

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(c. 185–129bc)Roman general and politician. He achieved distinction in the third Punic War, and blockaded and destroyed Carthage in 146. His successful campaign in Spain (133) ended organized ...
Dicaearchus

Dicaearchus  

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Of Messana,Greek polymath and prolific writer, pupil of Aristotle and contemporary of Theophrastus and Aristoxenus: fl. c.320–300 bc. Fragments only survive of his works, but they show a remarkable ...
eclecticism

eclecticism  

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(Greek, eklegein, to choose)An eclectic position in philosophy or religion is one that seeks to combine the best elements of other views.

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