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Ovid

(43 bc–c. 17ad), Roman poet. He is particularly known for his elegiac love poems (such as the Amores and the Ars Amatoria) and for the Metamorphoses, a hexametric epic which ...

Ovid

Ovid (USA)   Quick reference

Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Place Names (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...Ovid , USA Four states have cities with this name, either classical town names, as in New York, after Ovid ( 43 bc – ad 17 ), the Roman poet whose full name was Publius Ovidius Naso , or after another city with this name. For example, the Ovid in Michigan is named after the city in New York...

Ovid

Ovid (43 bc–ad 18)   Quick reference

An A-Z Guide to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... ( Publius Ovidius Naso ; 43 bc – ad 18 ) Roman poet . Shakespeare knew his works well, and used his Metamorphoses in both the original and the translation by Arthur Golding . For The Rape of Lucrece he used Ovid's Fasti , which had not been translated into English at the time. Metamorphoses appears on stage in Titus Andronicus iv . i. 42. The standard study is Shakespeare and Ovid ( 1993 ) by Jonathan Bate...

Ovid

Ovid   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to Literature in English Translation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
2,785 words

...from other 16th- and 17th-c. versions of Ovid's work] · The Heroycall Epistles of the Learned Poet Publius Ovidius Naso, in English Verse , tr. George Turbervile , London, 1567 [modern edn., London, 1928; extracts in Everyman Ovid] · Ovid his Invective against Ibis. Translated into English Meter , tr. Thomas Underdowne , 1569 [extracts in Everyman Ovid] · All Ovid's Elegies: 3 Bookes , tr. Christopher Marlowe , ‘Middleburgh’, c. 1597 [rep. in modern edns. of Marlowe's works; extracts in Everyman Ovid] · Ovid's Metamorphosis Englished , tr. George...

Ovid

Ovid   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

... The Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso ( 43 b.c.e. –17 c.e. ), better known to the world simply as Ovid, rewrote stories of Greek and Roman mythology and collected them in what became, in effect, an epic, entitled the Metamorphoses , composed of some 250 tales in fifteen books, tracing classical “history” from the creation to the apotheosis of Julius Caesar . This is a work that stresses the instability of life. In an earlier work, the Heroides , Ovid delighted his readers with dramatic monologues as love letters written between such mythological...

Ovid

Ovid ([Na])   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
154 words

... ( Publicus Ovidius Naso Ovid ) [Na] Roman poet , born on 20 March 43 bc at Sulmo (modern Sulmona) in Paeligni, Italy. His early studies were in rhetoric and law, but he soon abandoned these for poetry. With the exception of the Metamorphoses , all of Ovid's known poems were written in hexameters and can be divided into three groups: first, erotic poems, such as the collection of fictitious love letters known as the Heroides ; second, mythological poems such as the Metamorphoses , which is an account of the myths involving changes of form from the...

Ovid

Ovid (43 bc–ad 17)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
404 words

...Drayton were all indebted to him directly or through Arthur Golding 's translation of the Metamorphoses . Other notable translators include Marlowe, George Sandys , John Dryden , and Ted Hughes . Ovid has been an unrivalled source of subjects for painters and composers. See L. P. Wilkinson , Ovid Surveyed (1960) ; Charles Martindale (ed.), Ovid Renewed ...

Ovid

Ovid   Reference library

Panagiotis A. Agapitos

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
264 words

... ( Publius Ovidius Naso ), Roman poet; born 43 b.c. , died a.d. 17. His mythological epic Metamorphoses influenced directly or indirectly a number of late antique poets, such as Mousaios and Nonnos of Panopolis . Malalas mentions that Ovid wrote on Phaethon. In the 13th C. interest in Ovid was revived. Maximos Planoudes made complete prose translations of the Metamorphoses and Heroides (entitled Epistolai , or Letters ). His master copies (in part autograph) are preserved in Vat. Reg. gr. 132 and 133. A 14th-C. MS in Naples (Bibl. Naz. 2 C...

Ovid

Ovid   Reference library

Stephen E. Hinds

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
3,405 words

... J. C. Thibault , The Mystery of Ovid’s Exile ( 1964 ); R. Syme , History in Ovid ( 1978 ), 215–22 ), all that can be reconstructed from Ovid’s own hints is a vague picture of involuntary complicity (cf. Tr . 2. 103–8) in some scandal affecting the imperial house. Tomis, a superficially Hellenized town with a wretched climate on the extreme edge of the empire, was a singularly cruel place in which to abandon Rome’s most urbane poet. Public and private pleading failed to appease Augustus or (later) Tiberius : Ovid languished in Tomis until his death,...

Ovid

Ovid (43 bcad 17)   Reference library

Jonathan Bate

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...on the words of Ovid’s witch Medea ( Metamorphoses 7) raises questions about the ‘whiteness’ of his magic. Jonathan Bate Barkan, Leonard , The Gods Made Flesh: Metamorphosis and the Pursuit of Paganism (1986) Bate, Jonathan , Shakespeare and Ovid (1993) Burrow, Colin , Shakespeare and Classical Antiquity (2013) Carroll, William , The Metamorphoses of Shakespearean Comedy (1985) Nims, J. F. (ed.), Ovid’s Metamorphoses: The Arthur Golding Translation (1965, repr. 2000) Taylor, Tony (ed.), Shakespeare’s Ovid ...

Ovid

Ovid (43 bce – 17 ce)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
7,186 words

..., eds. Metamorphosis: The Changing Face of Ovid in Medieval and Early Modern Europe . Toronto: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2007. Martindale, Charles , ed. Ovid Renewed: Ovidian Influences on Literature and Art from the Middle Ages to the Twentieth Century . Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 1988. Syme, Ronald . History in Ovid . Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1978. Thibault, John C. The Mystery of Ovid's Exile . Berkeley: University of California Press, 1964. Wilkinson, L. P. Ovid Recalled . Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge...

Ovid

Ovid (43 bcad 18)   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
49 words

... ( 43 bc – ad 18 ) (Publius Ovidius Naso) Roman poet . He was a great success in Rome until, aged 50, he was exiled by Augustus . His works include Amores , short love poems; Ars Amatoria , amusing instructions on how to seduce women; and Metamorphoses , a retelling of Greek...

Ovid

Ovid   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,514 words

... ( Publius Ovidius Nāsō , 43 bc – ad 17 ), Roman poet , b. at Sulmo . As the son of an old equestrian family, Ovid was sent to Rome for his education. It was rounded off by the usual Grand Tour through Greek lands. After holding some minor judicial posts, he apparently abandoned public life for poetry—thus enacting one of the commonplaces of Roman elegiac (see below) autobiography. With early backing from Valerius Messalla Corvinus , Ovid quickly gained prominence as a writer, and by ad 8 he was the leading poet of Rome. In that year he was...

Ovid

Ovid (43 bcad 17)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Italian Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
123 words

... ( 43 bc – ad 17 ) (Publius Ovidius Naso). Arguably the most widely influential of Roman poets during the Middle Ages and Renaissance . Love poetry was indebted to his love lyrics proper ( Amores ), to his poetry on the art of seduction ( Ars amatoria ), and to his palinodes ( Remedia amoris ). The Metamorphoses , with their immense web of stories of transformation, including Apollo and Daphne, Pyramus and Thisbe, Orpheus and Eurydice, Andromeda and Perseus, and Diana and Actaeon, were commonly interpreted as moral and even theological allegories ...

Ovid

Ovid   Quick reference

Stephen E. Hinds

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
3,370 words

... J. C. Thibault , The Mystery of Ovid's Exile ( 1964 ); R. Syme , History in Ovid ( 1978 ), 215–22), all that can be reconstructed from Ovid's own hints is a vague picture of involuntary complicity (cf. Tr. 2. 103–8) in some scandal affecting the imperial house. Tomis, a superficially Hellenized town with a wretched climate on the extreme edge of the empire, was a singularly cruel place in which to abandon Rome's most urbane poet. Public and private pleading failed to appease Augustus or (later) Tiberius : Ovid languished in Tomis until his...

Ovid

Ovid (43 bc–ad 17)   Reference library

Stephen E. Hinds

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
4,133 words

..., Ovid's Poetics of Illusion (2002); N. Holzberg , Ovid: The Poet and his Work (trans. 2002); P. E. Knox (ed.), Oxford Readings in Ovid (2006); R. Gibson , S. Green , and A. Sharrock (eds.), The Art of Love: Bimillennial Essays on Ovid's Ars Amatoria and Remedia Amoris (2006). Literary and artistic reception L. Barkan , The Gods Made Flesh (1986); R. J. Hexter , Ovid and Medieval Schooling (1986); C. Martindale (ed.), Ovid Renewed (1988); S. A. Brown , The Metamorphosis of Ovid: From Chaucer to Ted Hughes (1999); T. Ziolkowski , Ovid and...

Ovid

Ovid (43 bc–ad 17)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
293 words

... ( Publius Ovidius Naso ) ( 43 bc – ad 17 ) Latin poet . He became known for his Amores (loves) and the mock‐didactic Ars Amatoria (art of love), poems in elegiac couplets in which he subverts the serious conventions of the Propertian elegy . The Heroides (heroines) are imaginary verse letters to their lovers from lovelorn women of mythology: Ariadne, abandoned by ungrateful Theseus ; Phaedra, trying to reveal just enough to Hippolytus; Dido, reproaching Aeneas for desertion. Ovid then took up the challenge of creating a long poem in ...

Ovid

Ovid (43 bcad 17)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
1,041 words

...the error is likely to have been the greater cause. This Ovid refers to only obliquely, but insists it was not scelus , ‘a crime’, and was connected with the Julian family to which Augustus belonged ( see Julia, gens ). Ovid seems to have been present when something culpable was done, perhaps being involved in one of the adulteries of Augustus’ daughter Julia (4) , who had been banished some years earlier in 2 bc , or of his granddaughter, also called Julia, who was also banished, like Ovid, in ad 8 . The error must have provided the occasion for...

Ovid

Ovid (43 bc–c.ad 17)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Political Quotations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
59 words

...0 Ovid 43 bc – c. ad 17 Roman poet Video meliora, proboque; Deteriora sequor. I see the better things, and approve; I follow the worse. Metamorphoses see the better things follow the worse How you, rebellious Germany, laid your wretched head beneath the feet of the great general. Tristia rebellious Germany head beneath the feet feet of the great ...

Ovid

Ovid (4317)   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
54 words

...Ovid 43 17 Roman poet Quod latet ignotum est, ignoti nulla cupido [What lies hid is unknown, and there is no desire for the unknown]. Ars Amatoria , 3.397. Hence, the proverbial phrase ‘for things unknown there is no desire’, one of the sayings lobbed about in Tony Hancock's immortal ‘Blood Donor’ TV...

Ovid

Ovid (43 bc–c.ad 17)   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
283 words

...0 Ovid 43 bc – c. ad 17 Roman poet Lente currite noctis equi. Run slowly, horses of the night. Amores bk. 1, no. 13, l. 40; see Marlowe lente currite noctis equi currite noctis equi currite noctis equi horses of the night horses of the night It is convenient that there be gods, and, as it is convenient, let us believe that there are. Ars Amatoria bk. 1, l. 637; see Voltaire convenient that there be gods convenient that there be gods Take rest; a field that has rested gives a bountiful crop. Ars Amatoria bk. 2, l. 351 Gutta cavat...

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