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Old Vic Theatre

A theatre in the Waterloo Road, London, famous for its notable productions of Shakespeare's plays under the management of Lilian Baylis (1874–1937), who took it over in 1912.

Old Vic Theatre

Old Vic Theatre   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
53 words

... Vic Theatre (previously the Royal Victoria ) A theatre in the Waterloo Road, London, long famous for its notable productions of Shakespeare's plays under the management of Lilian Baylis ( 1874–1937 ), who took it over in 1912 , and, from 1963 , for over ten years the home of the National Theatre...

Old Vic Theatre

Old Vic Theatre   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
53 words

... Vic Theatre (previously the Royal Victoria ) A theatre in the Waterloo Road, London, long famous for its notable productions of Shakespeare's plays under the management of Lilian Baylis ( 1874–1937 ), who took it over in 1912 , and, from 1963 , for over ten years the home of the National Theatre...

Old Vic Theatre

Old Vic Theatre   Quick reference

An A-Z Guide to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Baylis died in 1937 . The theatre was damaged in the war, but the Old Vic company continued its work, mainly at the New Theatre, and it reopened in 1950 . In 1953 under Michael Benthall it embarked on a plan to produce all Shakespeare's plays in five years, culminating in 1958 with Henry VIII with Gielgud and Edith Evans . The Old Vic company was disbanded in 1963 , and from then till 1976 the theatre was used by the National Theatre company . The theatre was briefly used as a centre for the Prospect Theatre Company ( 1977–81 ). Peter...

Old Vic theatre

Old Vic theatre   Reference library

Bradley Ryner

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... Vic theatre . Located in the Cut, off Waterloo Road, it is the fifth oldest standing theatre in London. Originally the Royal Coburg (built 1818 ), it provided broad melodrama but also hosted six appearances by Edmund Kean ( 1831 ). It was redecorated in 1833 , renamed the Royal Victoria Theatre after the future Queen, and soon became known affectionately as the ‘Old Vic’. Struggling financially, it was bought by social worker Emma Cons in 1880 and opened as a temperance music hall managed by William Poel . In the 1900s, Cons began staging...

Old Vic Theatre

Old Vic Theatre   Reference library

Eileen Cottis

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
312 words

...appeared at the theatre, and the directors included Tyrone Guthrie and Michel Saint-Denis . Baylis died in 1937 , and the theatre was bombed in 1941 . It was not fully repaired until 1950 , though from 1947 to 1952 it housed Saint-Denis's influential Old Vic Theatre School ( see training for theatre ). Michael Benthall also presented the entire First Folio between 1953 and 1958 . In 1963 the National Theatre Company under Laurence Olivier took over, staging numerous important productions and establishing the Old Vic as one of the most...

Old Vic Theatre

Old Vic Theatre   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
190 words

...in the First Folio, at popular prices. Throughout the 1930s most leading English actors appeared at the theatre, and the directors included *Guthrie and *Saint-Denis . Baylis died in 1937 , and the theatre was bombed in 1941 . In 1963 the *National Theatre Company under *Olivier took over, staging numerous important productions until the National's move to the South Bank in 1976 . Since then the Old Vic's status has been much debated, operated by a series of entrepreneurs and agencies and producing a variety of work. In 2003 its direction was...

Old Vic Theatre

Old Vic Theatre   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
1,196 words

...the National Theatre, ending with Pinter 's No Man's Land ( 1975 ). The last production before the move took place on 28 Feb. 1976 was a special charity performance of Tribute to the Lady , a celebration of the life and work of Lilian Baylis. A year later the theatre, which was being used by the Old Vic Youth Theatre (which retained its headquarters there until 1982 ), became the London home of the Prospect Theatre Company , which changed its name to the Old Vic Company in 1979 . In 1981 the company was forced to disband and the theatre was bought by...

Old Vic Theatre

Old Vic Theatre  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A theatre in the Waterloo Road, London, famous for its notable productions of Shakespeare's plays under the management of Lilian Baylis (1874–1937), who took it over in 1912.
Coriolanus

Coriolanus   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,020 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...in a more intellectually superior style in 1878 . Despite some notable revivals at the Old Vic in the 1920s, the play did not enjoy particular prominence in the 20th century until the rise of fascist movements across Europe brought it a renewed topicality. In France in 1934 the Action Française party induced the Comédie-Française to stage a version of the play which treated it as an all-out attack on democracy (stimulating violent demonstrations outside the theatre, though these failed to provoke the hoped-for military coup), and in Moscow the following...

Love’s Labour’s Lost

Love’s Labour’s Lost   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,517 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...to be acted on Shakespeare’s birthday at the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in Stratford in 1885 , but sporadic revivals there and elsewhere (including a musical version in 1919 ) failed to establish it in the repertory. The young Tyrone Guthrie produced it twice, first at the Westminster theatre in 1932 and then four years later at the Old Vic (with Michael Redgrave as the King), but neither production was a hit, though the play did become something of a favourite at the Open Air Theatre in Regents Park in the mid-1930s. The first production really to...

Henry VI Part 1

Henry VI Part 1   Reference library

Randall Martin and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,505 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...had the managing | That they lost France and made [Henry V’s] England bleed.’ Alan Bridges played a gallantly chivalrous Talbot, but the surprise was Nancie Jackson ’s sympathetically engaging Joan, acted with ‘a resolute pounce’. Seale’s remounting of the trilogy at the Old Vic in 1957 was received with even more enthusiasm, although Part 1 and The Contention were condensed into one play. This same approach characterized Peter Hall and John Barton ’s legendary Wars of the Roses for the RSC in 1963–4 , later broadcast internationally in a ...

All Is True

All Is True   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,792 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...coronation. In the 20th-century theatre the play, apparently inseparable from pictorial traditions of staging which now seemed quaintly or offensively Victorian, fell into some disfavour, though still revived at intervals for major actors to measure themselves against the starring roles: Sybil Thorndike played Katherine (Old Vic, 1918 , Empire theatre, 1925 ), Charles Laughton played Henry (Sadler’s Wells, 1933 , directed by Tyrone Guthrie , with Flora Robson as Katherine), and John Gielgud Wolsey (Old Vic, 1958 ). Guthrie revived the play...

Pericles

Pericles   Reference library

Sonia Massai and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,543 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

.... Pericles was the first of Shakespeare’s plays to be revived when the London theatres reopened in 1659–60 : the young Thomas Betterton was highly praised for his performance in the leading role. The play was not performed again until George Lillo adapted it as Marina in 1738 , omitting the first two acts. The play had hardly any stage revivals until Robert Atkins ’s 1921 production at the Old Vic . In 1939 Robert Eddison played Pericles at the Open Air Theatre in Regent’s Park: after the war, Paul Scofield played the title role twice (in...

As You Like It

As You Like It   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,253 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...stylized production at Stratford in 1919 —and a less jolly side to the play has sometimes been found by directors embarrassed by deer except as potential archetypal symbols. Despite a continuing succession of joyously sunny Rosalinds—from Peggy Ashcroft (Old Vic, 1932 ) through Edith Evans (Old Vic, 1936 , in Watteau-style costumes, with Michael Redgrave as Orlando) to Vanessa Redgrave (RSC, 1961 ) and Pippa Nixon (RSC, 2013 )—the play has often belonged more to Jaques than to Touchstone on the modern stage, with Duke Senior’s remarks on the joys of...

Richard II

Richard II   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, Anthony Davies, and Will Sharpe

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,895 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...was taken up by Frank Benson and Herbert Beerbohm Tree in the years preceding the First World War, the play had to wait until the 1920s to achieve real prominence. George Hayes played Richard at the Old Vic in 1924 (and again at Stratford thereafter), but the performance that really established the play was that of John Gielgud , first at the Old Vic in 1929–30 (joined by Ralph Richardson as Bolingbroke), then in the West End in 1937 (with Michael Redgrave ) , and subsequently on international tours and on radio. The role was widely regarded as...

The Two Noble Kinsmen

The Two Noble Kinsmen   Reference library

Michael Dobson

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,335 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...professionally again until an Old Vic production in 1928 , designed to suggest a pretty homage to a Chaucerian Merry England. Despite many student productions it then disappeared from the professional stage until a more symbolic, morris-dance-free revival at the Open Air Theatre in Regent’s Park in 1974 . Since then The Two Noble Kinsmen has been successfully revived at, among other venues, the Los Angeles Globe Playhouse ( 1979 ), the Edinburgh Festival (in a highly sexualized all-male production by the Cherub Theatre, 1979 ), the Centre Dramatique...

Richard III

Richard III   Reference library

Randall Martin and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,559 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

... Richard III appeared nearly every other season at Stratford-upon-Avon between 1894 and 1915 , and was made into a silent film in 1911 that today still conveys Benson’s ruthless exuberance. Laurence Olivier followed Benson’s example by transferring his celebrated 1944 Old Vic performance to the screen in 1955 . As with Olivier’s other films, this expanded audiences for Shakespeare enormously, while also creating a permanently visible interpretation later actors have sometimes found oppressive. Ian Holm successfully avoided comparisons with...

Troilus and Cressida

Troilus and Cressida   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,065 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...received sympathetically by the First World War veterans in its audience, but the first fully professional English production, at the Old Vic the following year, was a critical failure. More successful, however, was a modern-dress revival at the Westminster theatre in 1938 , and since the Second World War the play has been revived frequently, becoming something of a directors’ favourite. Tyrone Guthrie ’s 1956 Old Vic production was the first of many to costume the play on the eve of the First World War, with cavalry sabres about to give place to...

Henry IV Part 1

Henry IV Part 1   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,574 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...subsequent directors who have sought to stage the Second Tetralogy as a grand, Wagnerian sequence. At the Old Vic in 1930 John Gielgud played Hotspur to Ralph Richardson ’s Prince Harry, and another conspicuous production of that decade found the music-hall comedian George Robey playing a widely praised Sir John, in 1935 . The legendary production of the century, though, of both 1 Henry IV and 2 Henry IV , took place at the Old Vic in 1945 , when Ralph Richardson returned to the play as an alert, mercurial Sir John, Laurence Olivier played...

The Two Gentlemen of Verona

The Two Gentlemen of Verona   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,682 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...in Europe since the Second World War in productions such as that of Gundalf Gründgen (Düsseldorf, 1948 ). The play’s post-war fortunes in the English-speaking theatre have been more mixed. At Regent’s Park in 1949 it was heavily abridged by Robert Atkins to share a bill with The Comedy of Errors , but within ten years came two far more lavish, and highly successful, productions at the Old Vic , one (by Denis Carey , transferring to London from Bristol) in the style of a Renaissance masque ( 1952 , with John Neville as Valentine), and one (by ...

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