Update

You are looking at 1-20 of 4,431 entries  for:

  • All: Nine Years War x
clear all

View:

Overview

Nine Years War

(Apr. 1593–Mar. 1603), also known as Tyrone's rebellion, after the state's main antagonist in the conflict, Hugh O'Neill, 2nd earl of Tyrone. It arose from Fitzwilliam's ...

Nine Years War

Nine Years War   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
152 words

... Years War , 1689–97 . Also known as ‘King William's War’ or the ‘War of the English Succession’. William of Orange accepted England's throne in 1688 in the hope that the nation's sea power and financial strength could be used against Louis XIV 's ambitions in the Netherlands and Germany. The French king's support for the exiled James II made war inevitable, and in May 1689 William formed a Grand Alliance which included England, the Dutch, and the Holy Roman Emperor. In Ireland James's Franco‐Irish army was soon defeated at the Boyne in July 1690 ...

Nine Years War

Nine Years War (1689–97)   Reference library

Andrew Hanham

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
243 words

... Years War , 1689–97 . Also known as ‘ King William ’s War’ or the ‘War of the English Succession’. William of Orange accepted England’s throne in 1688 in the hope that the nation’s superior sea power and financial strength could be used in his struggle against Louis XIV ’s ambitions in the Netherlands and Germany. The French king’s support for the exiled James II in Ireland and his harassment of the English fleet early in 1689 made war inevitable, and in May William formed a Grand Alliance which included England, the United Provinces, and the Empire....

Nine Years War

Nine Years War (1688–97)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
216 words

... Years War ( 1688–97 ) Also known as the War of the Grand Alliance, a conflict that resulted from French aggression in the Rhineland, and that subsequently became a power struggle between Louis XIV of France and William III of Britain. In 1688 when French armies invaded Cologne and the Palatinate, the members of the League of Augsburg took up arms. Meanwhile William had driven James II from the throne of England and in 1689 a Grand Alliance of England, the United Provinces, Austria, Spain, and Savoy was formed against France. The French withdrew...

Nine Years War

Nine Years War (Apr. 1593–Mar. 1603)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
741 words

... Years War ( Apr. 1593–Mar. 1603 ), also known as Tyrone's rebellion, after the state's main antagonist in the conflict, Hugh O'Neill , 2nd earl of Tyrone. It arose from Fitzwilliam 's partition of Monaghan , which broke up the MacMahon lordship and threatened other Ulster lordships with a similar fate. The state's other main antagonist, Red Hugh O'Donnell , was O'Neill's son‐in‐law. Their alliance transcended traditional rivalry in Ulster and came to include many other Gaelic lords in an oath‐bound confederacy which initially took the form of a secret...

Nine Years' War

Nine Years' War (1594–1603)   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

... Years' War ( 1594–1603 ). The name given to the war between Hugh O'Neill , Earl of Tyrone, and his Ulster allies, notably his son-in-law Red Hugh O'Donnell , and the crown. At the beginning O'Neill played a double role, displaying loyalty to the state in the conflict over the division of the MacMahon lordship in Monaghan, while at the same time supporting rebels like his brother Cormac ; it was not until 1595 that he was declared a traitor. The early battles of the war consisted of guerrilla-like ambushes of crown forces, the rebels making good use...

Nine Years War

Nine Years War  

(Apr. 1593–Mar. 1603),also known as Tyrone's rebellion, after the state's main antagonist in the conflict, Hugh O'Neill, 2nd earl of Tyrone. It arose from Fitzwilliam's partition of Monaghan, which ...
Nine Years War

Nine Years War  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
(1688–97)Also known as the War of the Grand Alliance, a conflict that resulted from French aggression in the Rhineland, and that subsequently became a power struggle between Louis XIV of France and ...
Love’s Labour’s Lost

Love’s Labour’s Lost   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,517 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... 1994–5 , set in a Zuleika Dobson -esque Edwardian Oxford on the eve of the First World War. The Edwardian aesthetic, and, specifically, the evocation of the period as one of easy privilege and innocence on the eve of a devastating war, has been a surprisingly recurrent motif of subsequent professional productions; surprising mainly because there have been so few. Just as Judge’s had ended to the sound of distant mortar explosions and gunfire, the spectre of the Great War appeared to bite with frosts the Edwardian summer of Trevor Nunn’s production (National,...

31 The History of the Book in Hungary

31 The History of the Book in Hungary   Reference library

Bridget Guzner

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
2,982 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...from Holland, Germany, England, Sweden, and Poland. His Georgian, *Greek , *Hebrew , and *Armenian type s, cut with meticulous expertise, further enhanced his reputation. On his return to Kolozsvár, he brought together municipal and church presses, and in the next nine years published more than 100 finely printed inexpensive books, including the scholarly works of Ferenc Pápai Páriz, the scientist and compiler of a Latin–Hungarian dictionary. Kis strove to stamp out illiteracy and cultural backwardness and to develop a uniform Hungarian...

Labour History

Labour History   Quick reference

John L. Halstead

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,401 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...North‐East ( 1970 ). The nine days of May, the General Strike, should not completely overshadow the seven‐month struggle of the subsequent lockout, for which we now have a fine study: John McIlroy , Alan Campbell , and Keith Gildart (eds), Industrial Politics and the 1926 Mining Lockout: The Struggle for Dignity ( 2004 ). As to Russia, Bill Jones surveys the period 1917–48 in The Russia Complex: The British Labour Party and the Soviet Union ( 1977 ). A more detailed and specialized treatment of Labour's early inter‐war years is in Stephen White , ...

29 The History of the Book in Modern Greece, c.1453–2000

29 The History of the Book in Modern Greece, c.1453–2000   Reference library

Alexis Politis

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
2,142 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...followed a year later by the Academy of Athens; both formed noteworthy libraries. This period also saw the publication of the twelve-volume Eleftheroudakis Encyclopaedic Dictionary/Lexicon ( 1927–31 ), followed by the nine-volume Major Dictionary of the Greek Language ( 1936–50 ) by Demetrios Demetrakos-Mesiskles . During World War II, literary publishing blossomed. In the absence of European imports, Greek books gained readers, some books generating queues outside bookshops, and some editions selling out in days. New publishing houses appeared on the...

35 The Slavonic Book in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus

35 The Slavonic Book in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus   Reference library

Christine Thomas

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
7,074 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
2

... 1800s . 7 From 19 th -century Russia to World War I In the first half of the 19 th century, education expanded and university enrolments grew, stimulating a demand for books among a wider section of society. Printing technology improved, and in the 1830s the first successful commercial publishers and booksellers emerged. The war against Napoleon had a devastating effect on the trade: the 1812 fire of Moscow destroyed presses (including Moscow University Press), MSS, and thousands of books. The following years saw a steady recovery. The Ekspeditsiia...

Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, Anthony Davies, and Will Sharpe

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,203 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...was revived in every season from 1914 to 1923 , and again in 1932 , with Ralph Richardson as a much-praised Brutus. The most famous inter-war production, however, took place at the Mercury theatre in New York, when Orson Welles directed the play in modern dress, giving the conspiracy strong anti-fascist overtones: the idea was imitated at the Embassy theatre in London soon after the outbreak of war. Notable post-war productions have included Anthony Quayle ’s in Stratford in 1950 (with Quayle as Antony and John Gielgud as Cassius), Minos Volanakis’s...

Slavery

Slavery   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,891 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and their local-born descendants (who inherited their mothers' bondage) were spread unevenly. They were concentrated overwhelmingly in that string of possessions across the Caribbean sugar islands (territories greatly augmented by the gains of the treaty that ended the Seven Years War) and in those mainland settlements which had flourished on the back of plantation-based staple production, notably tobacco in the Chesapeake and rice in South Carolina. Africans were imported into the Americas to work for their (mainly white) owners. Whatever else they achieved...

Family and Society

Family and Society   Quick reference

Ralph Houlbrooke

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,144 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...other people besides the couple.) Parish registers reveal, during the first century after their inception, levels of infant and child mortality almost certainly lower than those of the 150 years after the Black Death. Infant mortality ranged from less than one in nine of those born in one remote rural parish to one in three in a crowded London suburb in non‐plague years; nationally the figure may have been one in six or seven. A fairly long period of maternal breastfeeding, which prolonged intervals between births and improved babies’ chances of survival,...

27 The History of the Book in the Iberian Peninsula

27 The History of the Book in the Iberian Peninsula   Reference library

María Luisa López-Vidriero

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,347 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...type design, and, to a certain extent, that influence lies behind the typographical features common to Castilian *black-letter types. Three stages of Castilian printing can be distinguished. From 1472 to 1478 , there are records of only fifteen *printing offices , of which nine had a printer whose name is known. Spanish printers worked in Seville and Valencia; in the rest of Spain, presses were run by foreign master printers. The names of most printers working in the northern Castilian Meseta remain unknown, except for Parix (at Segovia and perhaps also...

The Winter’s Tale

The Winter’s Tale   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,428 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Synopsis: 1.1 Camillo, a courtier to Leontes, King of Sicilia, exchanges courtesies with Archidamus, who is visiting in the train of Leontes’ childhood friend Polixenes, King of Bohemia. They speak enthusiastically of Leontes’ young son Mamillius. 1.2 Polixenes has been in Sicilia nine months, and plans to embark for Bohemia the following day. Leontes implores him to stay another week, and when his pregnant Queen Hermione adds her own entreaties Polixenes finally relents. Leontes becomes convinced that Polixenes and Hermione are conducting an affair: he talks...

42 The History of the Book in Japan

42 The History of the Book in Japan   Reference library

P. F. Kornicki

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
8,152 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
4

...dictionaries, guides to poetry composition, and medical texts. Throughout this entire period from the 12 th to 16 th centuries, very few works of Japanese authorship were printed, with the principal exception of Ōjō yōshū , a treatise on the ‘essentials for salvation’, of which nine editions were printed between 1168 and 1600 . The world of print was dominated in fact by Buddhist texts and texts in Chinese, and these required sophisticated Sinological literacy of their readers. There is little sign, therefore, of a book trade or of commercial publication...

48 The History of the Book in America

48 The History of the Book in America   Reference library

Scott E. Casper and Joan Shelley Rubin

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
13,059 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...th century, media conglomerates—several based in Europe—continued to absorb formerly independent publishers, both exclusively trade operations and those houses with mass-market paperback divisions. Scribner merged in 1984 with Macmillan, which was in turn bought by Paramount nine years later; *Bertelsmann purchased *Bantam, Doubleday , and *Dell in 1986 ; Rupert Murdoch acquired Harper in 1987 . Christian publishing was not exempt from this pattern: *Zondervan became part of HarperCollins in 1988 . More recent industry mergers include Viacom’s...

45 The History of the Book in New Zealand

45 The History of the Book in New Zealand   Reference library

Shef Rogers

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
3,037 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...books of its first significant printer. Nine months after the Treaty of Waitangi, Queen Victoria established New Zealand as a separate Crown colony; organized settlement soon followed. In almost every New Zealand Company community, colonists established printing presses within a year of arrival: sixteen newspapers were founded by 1851 , 28 by 1858 . The Government created an official Printing Office in Auckland in 1842–7 , and in Wellington from 1864 , until its privatization in 1989 . For many years it was the country’s most technically advanced...

View: