Update

You are looking at 1-20 of 96 entries  for:

  • All: Nicholas Hawksmoor x
clear all

View:

Overview

Nicholas Hawksmoor

(1661–1736). One of the two most imaginative English Baroque architects (the other was Vanbrugh), he worked with Wren, notably on the Chelsea Hospital, St Paul's Cathedral, and ...

Hawksmoor, Nicholas

Hawksmoor, Nicholas (c.1661–1736)   Reference library

David Denis Aldridge

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
161 words

..., Nicholas ( c. 1661–1736 ) . 250 years after his death some late 20th-century critical opinion hails Hawksmoor as the most interesting and daringly original architect England has produced. The process resulting in this reappraisal has been one of informed deduction made the more complex because of the problems in distinguishing the collaborative work of Hawksmoor from that of his chief partners , rather than masters, Wren and Vanbrugh . Hawksmoor, self-schooled in the architecture of the classical world (though he never went abroad), above all...

Hawksmoor, Nicholas

Hawksmoor, Nicholas (1661–1736)   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
50 words

..., Nicholas ( 1661–1736 ) English Baroque architect. He assisted Christopher Wren on the construction of St Paul's, London, and worked with John Vanbrugh at Castle Howard and Blenheim Palace. He is celebrated for his six London church designs, including St Mary's, Woolnoth ( 1716–27 ), and St George's, Bloomsbury ( 1716–31...

Hawksmoor, Nicholas

Hawksmoor, Nicholas (1661–1736)   Reference library

Anthony Quiney

The Oxford Companion to Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
853 words
Illustration(s):
1

..., Nicholas ( 1661–1736 ) English architect . Never was there ‘a more reasonable man, nor one so little prejudiced in favour of his own performances’. Thus Sir Thomas Robinson pronounced judgement on Hawksmoor in 1734 when his individual style of Baroque had fallen from grace and he had been dismissed from the Office of Works once, and passed over for important commissions often. After two centuries of criticism from the Palladians and the supporters of the Gothic Revival , Hawksmoor’s singular genius has won back the highest esteem. Today he...

Hawksmoor, Nicholas

Hawksmoor, Nicholas   Reference library

Patrick Taylor

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

..., Nicholas ( c .1661–1736 ), an enigmatic but very attractive English architect born in Nottinghamshire. He is probably best known for the six churches he built from 1711 in the city of London to replace those lost in the great fire of 1666 . With Sir Christopher Wren he worked on the Orangery at Kensington Palace ( 1704–5 ), and John Vanbrugh was also involved. He worked as Vanbrugh's assistant on the building of Castle Howard and Blenheim Palace . At Blenheim he designed the Triumphal Gateway ( c .1722 ) which forms the entrance to the...

Hawksmoor, Nicholas

Hawksmoor, Nicholas (1661–1736)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
799 words

..., Nicholas ( 1661–1736 ) One of the two most imaginative English Baroque architects (the other was Vanbrugh ), he worked with Wren from c. 1684, notably on the Chelsea Hospital, St Paul’s Cathedral, and the City Churches, all in London. He was Clerk of Works (1689–1715) at Kensington Palace (where he supervised the building of the Orangery (1704–5—probably designed by Wren, with revisions by Vanbrugh and Hawksmoor)), and was Clerk of Works (1698–1735) at Greenwich Hospital, where he played a major role in the design of the east range of Queen...

Hawksmoor, Nicholas

Hawksmoor, Nicholas   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
61 words

..., Nicholas ( c. 1661–1736 ). 250 years after his death some critical opinion hailed Hawksmoor as the most daringly original architect England has produced. Hawksmoor, self‐schooled in the architecture of the classical world, built seven London churches during the twelve years 1712–24 , revealing a profoundly original control of mass, if not of the play of light, over complementary broken...

Hawksmoor (Hawksmore), Nicholas

Hawksmoor (Hawksmore), Nicholas (1661–1736)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Christian Art and Architecture (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
306 words

... (Hawksmore), Nicholas ( 1661–1736 ), was Wren 's assistant from c . 1679 , first as a clerk, and after c . 1682 on architectural projects, notably the rebuilding of the City churches destroyed in the Fire of London in 1666 . From 1691 he was Wren's assistant on the rebuilding of St Paul's Cathedral. The 1711 Act for the Building of Fifty New Churches, which was to provide churches for new areas of London, appointed Hawksmoor as one of the surveyors (he was later joined briefly by Gibbs ). For this project he designed six large churches, all...

Hawksmoor, Nicholas

Hawksmoor, Nicholas   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
50 words
Hawksmoor, Nicholas

Hawksmoor, Nicholas   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
40 words
Nicholas Hawksmoor

Nicholas Hawksmoor  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1661–1736).One of the two most imaginative English Baroque architects (the other was Vanbrugh), he worked with Wren, notably on the Chelsea Hospital, St Paul's Cathedral, and the City Churches, all ...
Historic Churches

Historic Churches   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,420 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...were deliberately designed to look medieval and many old buildings were ‘improved’ with new Gothic features. The use of Classical architecture for parish churches is largely restricted to the later 17th, 18th, and early 19th centuries. After the Fire of London ( 1666 ) Wren and Hawksmoor built a remarkable series of churches, whose designs influenced builders in other towns and in parts of the countryside where new accommodation was needed or where a great landowner rebuilt a church on his estate. In the Victorian period such estate churches were invariably...

John James

John James  

Reference type:
Overview Page
 (c.1673–1746) English architect.He became a master carpenter and from 1701 designed a number of houses. As Hawksmoor’s associate, he worked at Greenwich (1705–46), and on four churches built under ...
Kerry John Downes

Kerry John Downes  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1930– ).English architectural historian. Specializing in English Baroque architecture, he made a significant contribution with his works on Hawksmoor, Vanbrugh, and Wren. He has also written ...
3rd earl of Carlisle, Charles Howard

3rd earl of Carlisle, Charles Howard  

(1669–1738).Though twice 1st lord of the Treasury, Carlisle's political career was inconsequential, and his lasting achievement was the building of Castle Howard. He succeeded to the earldom in 1692. ...
William Talman

William Talman  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1650–1719).English gentle-man-architect. He rose to eminence during the Restoration period and became Comptroller of the Works to King William III (1689–1702) in 1689. He designed several large ...
George Browne

George Browne  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1811–85).Belfast-born architect who worked in Canada from 1830. His best-known works are the Church of St George, Kingston, Ontario (1859), a variant on Gibbs's St Martin-in-the-Fields, and the City ...
gate lodges

gate lodges  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Buildings to house a gate-keeper at the entrance to a country house. Although found elsewhere in Europe, the lodge is essentially a British building type, both in quantity and quality.[...]
Hugh May

Hugh May  

Reference type:
Overview Page
 (1621–84) English architect.Thanks to his royal connections, May entered the Office of Works (1660) and worked on restoring palaces, particularly Windsor Castle, after the Restoration. He designed ...
Venetian window

Venetian window  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
[De]A window having three apertures, of which the central one is much larger than the lateral ones, separated from one another by slender piers.
Jan Blažej Santini-Aichel

Jan Blažej Santini-Aichel  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1677–1723).Born in Prague, he was one of the most original and inventive architects of C18 Bohemia. He mingled Baroque and Gothic styles, as at the Church of the Assumption at Sedlec (1701–6), the ...

View: