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Neo-Expressionism

Movement in painting (and to a lesser extent sculpture) emerging in the late 1970s, typified by intense subjectivity of feeling and aggressively raw handling of materials. ...

Neo-Expressionism

Neo-Expressionism   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
114 words

...-Expressionism A movement in painting, and to a lesser degree sculpture, which emerged in the late 1970s and was firmly established on the critical map in the early 1980s with a number of major exhibitions, especially ‘A New Spirit in Painting’ held at the Royal Academy, London in 1981 . The paintings are typically on a large scale, rapidly executed, and display a raw, expressive approach to their materials. Objects such as straw or broken crockery may be embedded in the paint surface. Subject-matter is usually figurative but often infused with a spirit of...

Neo-Expressionism

Neo-Expressionism   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Modern and Contemporary Art (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
463 words

...-Expressionism Movement in painting (and to a lesser extent sculpture) emerging internationally at the end of the 1970s, characterized by intense subjectivity of feeling and aggressively raw handling of materials. Various other names have been applied to the movement: Energism, New Fauvism, Wild Painting; in France, Figuration Libre; in Italy, Transavantgarde . Neo-Expressionist paintings are typically large and rapidly executed. They are usually figurative, often with violent or doom-laden subjects, but the image is sometimes almost lost in the welter of...

Neo-Expressionism

Neo-Expressionism   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of American Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
1,701 words

...American Neo-Expressionism, which for him exemplified the blasé secularism of a society obsessed with popular culture and incapable of critique. In his later writings, Kuspit polemically posed Neo-Expressionism, as an empathetic exploration of pathos and ethical transgression in search of a spiritual truth, against what he termed conceptual “pseudo-art.” American artist and critic Thomas Lawson argued for the relevance of painting as the form best suited to critique the mass media, but dismissed Neo-Expressionism as conventional and uncritical. Neo...

Neo-Expressionism

Neo-Expressionism   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Art (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
263 words

...-Expressionism . Movement in painting (and to a lesser extent sculpture) emerging in the late 1970s, characterized by intense subjectivity of feeling and aggressively raw handling of materials. Neo-Expressionist paintings are typically large and rapidly executed, sometimes with materials such as straw or broken crockery embedded in their surfaces. They are usually figurative, often with violent or doom-laden subjects, but the image is sometimes almost lost in the welter of surface activity. To some extent Neo-Expressionism marked a return to more traditional...

Neo-Expressionism

Neo-Expressionism   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artists (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
268 words

...-Expressionism Movement in painting (and to a lesser extent sculpture) emerging in the late 1970s, typified by intense subjectivity of feeling and aggressively raw handling of materials. Neo-Expressionist paintings are typically large and rapidly executed, sometimes with materials such as straw or broken crockery embedded in their surfaces. They are usually figurative, often with violent or doom-laden subjects, but the image is sometimes almost lost in the welter of surface activity. To some extent Neo-Expressionism marked a return to more traditional forms...

Neo-Expressionism

Neo-Expressionism  

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Movement in painting (and to a lesser extent sculpture) emerging in the late 1970s, typified by intense subjectivity of feeling and aggressively raw handling of materials. Neo-Expressionist paintings ...
Oskar Sosnowski

Oskar Sosnowski  

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(1880–1939).Polish architect, one of the leading designers of the inter-war period. His masterpiece is the Church of St Jakob (James), Warsaw (1909–23), in a type of severe monumental cubic ...
Neo-Geo

Neo-Geo  

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Term (short for Neo-Geometric Conceptualism) applied to the work of a group of American artists active in New York in the mid-1980s who employed a variety of styles and media but were linked by the ...
Rainer Fetting

Rainer Fetting  

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(1949– )German painter, born in Wilhelmshaven, the son of an art teacher. To avoid military service he moved to Berlin in 1972 to study art. In 1977 he cofounded the Galerie am Moritzplatz in the ...
gestural painting

gestural painting  

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A term describing the application of paint with expansive gestures so that the sweep of the artist's arm is deliberately emphasized. It carries an implication that the artist's actions express his or ...
Eugen Schönebeck

Eugen Schönebeck  

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(1936– )German painter, born in Heidenau, near Dresden. He initially studied in East Berlin but moved to the West in 1956, studying at the Hochschule für bildende Künste until 1961. He met Georg ...
Transavantgarde

Transavantgarde  

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A term, translated from the Italian transavanguardia (beyond the avant-garde), originated by Achille Bonito Oliva in Flash Art (October–November 1979) and originally associated with Italian ...
Neo-primitivism

Neo-primitivism  

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A movement or trend in Russian painting in the early 20th century in which influences from the Western avant-garde were combined in a deliberately crude way with features derived from peasant art, ...
Karel Appel

Karel Appel  

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(b Amsterdam, 25 Apr. 1921; d Zurich, 3 May 2006).Dutch painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, designer, and writer, regarded as the most powerful of the post-war generation of Dutch artists. In ...
New Image Painting

New Image Painting  

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A vague term applied since the late 1970s to the work of certain painters who employ a strident figurative style, often with cartoon-like imagery and abrasive handling owing something to ...
Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz  

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(b Deutschbaselitz, Saxony, 23 Jan. 1938).German painter and sculptor. He is regarded as one of the leading exponents of Neo-Expressionism and his work has often been the subject of controversy, ...
Gillian Ayres

Gillian Ayres  

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(1930– )British abstract painter, born in London, where she studied at Camberwell School of Art, 1946–50. Tim Hilton described her as one of the British painters of her generation who were ‘impatient ...
Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino  

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(1948– )Italian painter and sculptor, a leading figure in the Transavantgarde. Born in Paduli as Domenico Paladino he spent most of his youth in Naples. His paintings tend to vivid reds and ...
Postminimalism

Postminimalism  

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A term coined in 1971 by the American critic Robert Pincus-Witten (1935– ) to refer to developments in American art that succeeded Minimal art (which had been the dominant avant-garde trend of the ...
Charles Saatchi

Charles Saatchi  

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(b Baghdad, 9 June 1943).Iraqi-born British businessman and art collector. In 1970 he was co-founder with his brother Maurice of Saatchi & Saatchi, which became the world's largest advertising ...

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