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Navarre

An autonomous region of northern Spain, on the border with France; capital, Pamplona. It represents the southern part of the former kingdom of Navarre, which was conquered by Ferdinand in ...

Navarre

Navarre   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
146 words

... or (Spanish) Navarra . . The kingdom of Navarre, which is now divided into a Spanish province south of the Pyrenees and a French region north of the Pyrenees, was for centuries an independent Hispanic kingdom. After 1234 the crown of Navarre passed by marriage to a series of French-speaking rulers, and from 1314 to 1328 Navarre was incorporated into France. The kingdom subsequently came within the ambit of the crown of Aragon, but in 1484 the crown passed by marriage to the French house of Albret. In 1512 Ferdinand of Aragon conquered...

Navarre

Navarre   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
92 words

... Autonomous region and ancient kingdom in n Spain, stretching from the River Ebro to the w Pyrenees border; the capital is Pamplona . For 400 years, the Kingdom of Navarre fended off successive invasions by the Visigoths, Arabs, and Franks. In 1512 Ferdinand II of Aragon annexed s Navarre. The n part was incorporated as French crown land in 1589 . The Spanish region has historically maintained semi-autonomous status. It is a mountainous, agricultural region producing cattle, grapes, timber, cereals, vegetables, and sugar beet. Area: 10,421sq...

Navarre

Navarre   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
774 words
Illustration(s):
1

...frontier marches of *Castile and *Aragon . 3. Navarre’s decline Hemmed in by her Aragonese and Castilian descendants, Navarre was largely blocked from expansion against Spanish Islam. The French domination of the Midi as a result of the Albigensian *Crusade prevented Navarre from becoming a major player in southern France. The defence of the kingdom’s very existence was endangered by the demise of the Sánchez line in 1234 . Though both Aragonese and Castilian contenders attempted to claim Navarre as their own, the kingdom eventually settled on a...

Navarre

Navarre   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
1,890 words

...Navarre. Effectively governing the routes and stages from Ostabat to the gates of Logroño, the king of Navarre took charge of the accommodation of pilgrims, who had already been going to Santiago for at least two centuries, but who went there in crowds from the 11th to the 13th century. Noteworthy was the passage through Navarre, early in the 10th c., of Bishop Godescalc of Le Puy , who halted at Albelda, near Logroño, a foundation ( 924 ) of King Sancho Garcés of Navarre. The bishopric of Pamplona covered the essential part of the kingdom of Navarre. But...

Navarre

Navarre   Quick reference

Neil Morris

Dictionary Plus Social Sciences

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
98 words

...Navarre ( Spanish Navarra ) An autonomous region of northern Spain, on the border with France; capital, Pamplona. It represents the southern part of the former Basque kingdom of Navarre, founded in the ninth century and stretching into France. In 1512 the southern territory was conquered by Ferdinand II of Aragon and governed by a viceroy until 1833 , when it was fully incorporated into Spain. The north is dominated by the Pyrenees mountains, and in the south the main crops are wheat, maize, grapes, tomatoes, and alfalfa. Area 10,390 km 2 . Population...

Navarre

Navarre   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

... , a Spanish kingdom in the north of the Iberian Peninsula, under French rule from 1234 until 1512 , when it was reincorporated into Spain by the Catholic monarchs, Ferdinand and Isa-bella. In the spring of 1366 , Chaucer was granted a safe conduct by Charles II of Navarre, permitting him to travel through the latter's kingdom, with three companions and their equipment, a document which suggests that Chaucer may have visited Spain that year ( see Spaigne ). [ +Patricia Shaw Urdiales...

Navarre

Navarre (Spain)   Quick reference

Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Place Names (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...Navarre ( Navarra ) , Spain An autonomous community and former Franco-Spanish kingdom founded by Basques in the 9th century . The Spanish part joined Castile in 1515 while the French part continued as a separate kingdom until 1589 when it joined France. The name is taken from the Basque ‘Nafarroa’, the name for two groups of Vascones living around Pamplona....

Navarre

Navarre   Reference library

Dictionary of American Family Names (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Names studies
Length:
23 words

... US frequency (2010): 3030 French: habitational name from Navarre (see Navarra ). Some characteristic forenames: French Emile, Jacques, Anatole, Angelle, Camille,...

Navarre, Yves

Navarre, Yves (1940–94)   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Literature in French

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
108 words

..., Yves ( 1940–94 ). French novelist , playwright , poet , and essayist , noted for his contribution to debates on homosexual rights. His many works show a paradoxical, often provocative, combination of lyricism and violence, particularly in the portrayal of homosexual relationships (e.g. Les Loukoums , 1973 ). His novel Le Jardin d'acclimatation ( 1980 ) won the Prix Goncourt. In the 1980s his fiction reflected a growing concern with the writing process itself, from the transitional Biographie ( 1981 ) to Romans, un roman ( 1988 ). The AIDS...

Marguerite de Navarre

Marguerite de Navarre (1492–1549)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
79 words

...de Navarre ( 1492–1549 ) Sister of François I and patron of humanism in France. She was close to Briçonnet’s proto-Protestant circle, and her Miroir de l’âme pécheresse (three editions were printed by *Augereau ) was condemned by the Sorbonne in 1533 . Semi-exiled in Navarre after 1534 , she continued to protect persecuted writers and printers (Marot, *Dolet ). Her masterpiece, a volume of tales imitated from Boccaccio, was posthumously published in 1558 as Heptameron . Vincent...

Navarre, Marguerite of

Navarre, Marguerite of   Reference library

Ronald W. Vince

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
114 words

..., Marguerite of ( 1492–1549 ) French poet and dramatist. Sister of François I of France, consort of Henri II of Navarre , and author of the Heptameron , Marguerite also wrote four spiritual comedies and several secular plays (‘théâtre profane’), all acted, or intended to be acted, before aristocratic audiences . The four biblical plays are loosely modelled on medieval mysteries , the seven secular plays on contemporary farce and morality drama. Most, Much, Little, Less ( 1545–6 ) is a satire on the clergy; The Passing of the King ...

Joan of Navarre

Joan of Navarre (b. c.1370)   Quick reference

The Kings and Queens of Britain (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
140 words

...of Navarre , queen of England, b. c .1370 , da. of Charles , king of Navarre, and Joanna , da. of John II of France; m. (1) John IV , duke of Brittany; (2) Henry IV , 7 Feb. 1403 ; d. 9 July 1437 ; bur. Canterbury. Henry IV's second wife was married first to John, duke of Brittany, who died in 1399 , leaving her as regent to their young son; the union was intended to stave off French interference with the duchy. There were eight children by her first marriage, none by her second. She remained in England after her stepson had succeeded as Henry...

Joan of Navarre

Joan of Navarre (c.1370–1437)   Reference library

R. L. Storey

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
141 words

...of Navarre ( c. 1370–1437 ), queen of Henry IV . A daughter of Charles the Bad, king of Navarre, Joan married John IV , duke of Brittany, in 1386 ; they had eight children. After his death in 1399 , she acted as regent for Duke John V until his inauguration in 1401 . Henry (IV) had visited the Breton court during his exile, which may partially account for his suit. Joan came to England and was crowned in 1403 ; the marriage was childless. She chose to remain in England after Henry’s death. Relations with her stepson Henry V were amicable...

Marguerite de Navarre

Marguerite de Navarre (1492–1549)   Reference library

Gordon Campbell

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
166 words

...de Navarre ( 1492–1549 ) Catholic Reformer, also known as Marguerite d’Angoulême and Marguerite d’Alençon. Her position as sister to King Francis I enabled her to act as patron and protector to Protestants. She supported the reforms in the diocese of Meaux led by Briçonnet , and entered into an extensive correspondence with him on spiritual matters. She was not a Protestant, but her thinking was informed by Lutheran and Calvinist doctrine, and by the spiritual libertinism deplored by Calvin. These sympathies associated her with the movement known in...

Momaday, Navarre Scott

Momaday, Navarre Scott (1934–)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
105 words

...Navarre Scott ( 1934–  ) Native American writer , born on the Kiowa reservation in Oklahoma, whose second publication, House Made of Dawn ( 1968 ), which received the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, played a key role in the resurgence of Native American literature . He works in a range of different genres: stories and poems ( In the Presence of the Sun , 1992 ), Kiowa mythology ( The Way to Rainy Mountain , 1996 ), and Three Plays ( 2007 ). The Names ( 1976 ) is a memoir. In 2007 he was awarded the National Medal of Arts by President George...

Momaday, Navarre Scott

Momaday, Navarre Scott (1934–)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
83 words

...Navarre Scott ( 1934– ) Native American writer , born on the Kiowa reservation in Oklahoma, whose second publication, House Made of Dawn ( 1968 ) played a key role in the resurgence of Native American literature . His works include stories and poems ( In the Presence of the Sun , 1992 ), Kiowa mythology ( The Way to Rainy Mountain , 1996 ), and memoir ( The Names , 1976 ). In the Bear's House ( 1999 ) is illustrated by his own...

Navarre, House of

Navarre, House of   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Religion
Length:
2,212 words

...Navarre by inheritance, and by marriage she joined this illustrious legacy to another important family of southwestern France, traced from tenth-century origins in Gascony, the Albrets, who had collected lordships through marriage and conquest. The alliance of Foix and Albret, reinforcing the royal title of Navarre, might have signaled the emergence of an important new dynasty; but Navarre was a tiny kingdom caught between powerful and expansionist neighbors. From the mid-1490s the crowns of France and Spain usually were at war with one another, and Navarre...

Antoine of Navarre

Antoine of Navarre (1518–1562)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Religion
Length:
753 words

...of Navarre ( 1518–1562 ), duke of Vendôme and king of Navarre. Owing to his direct descent from Louis IX in the Bourbon branch, next in line for the French crown after the reigning Valois , Antoine of Bourbon was first prince of the blood. His father, Charles of Bourbon, had distinguished himself in the earlier wars against the Habsburgs, so his heirs had escaped the disgrace that had fallen on others after the defection of the constable of Bourbon in 1523 . Antoine was made governor of Picardy in 1537 by Francis I and campaigned extensively...

Marguerite de Navarre

Marguerite de Navarre (1492–1549)   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Literature in French

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
424 words

...de Navarre (also known as Marguerite d'Angoulême or d'Alençon ) ( 1492–1549 ). Born in Angoulême, daughter of Charles d'Angoulême and Louise de Savoie , she received the same humanist education as her younger brother, the future François I er . She was married in 1509 to Charles d'Alençon ( d. 1525 ), then in 1527 to Henri d'Albret , king of Navarre . Her daughter, Jeanne d'Albret , was mother of the future Henri IV . Throughout her life she was intimately involved in the political life of France, particularly in the period...

Jeanne of Navarre

Jeanne of Navarre (1528–1572)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Religion
Length:
1,252 words

...of Navarre (Fr., Jeanne d'Albret ; 1528–1572 ), queen of Navarre. Her ancestry largely determined her character and career. Her father, Henry d'Albret, inherited the rump of the medieval kingdom of Navarre left on the northern side of the Pyrenees after the conquest of the southern part by Ferdinand of Aragon in 1512 . The reconquest of the lost part was d'Albret's lifelong obsession. He insisted on the imaginary title “king of Navarre”—his real possessions being the remnant, Basse-Navarre, and the vicomté of Béarn. This all-consuming ambition...

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