You are looking at 1-6 of 6 entries  for:

  • All: Naujote x
clear all

View:

Overview

Naujote

Subject: Religion

(generally interpreted as ‘new birth’). The Zoroastrian initiation ceremony. The central conviction behind Zoroastrian ethics is the emphasis on human free will. Initiation, ...

Naujote

Naujote   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
212 words

... (generally interpreted as ‘new birth’). The Zoroastrian initiation ceremony. The central conviction behind Zoroastrian ethics is the emphasis on human free will. Initiation, therefore, cannot take place until a child is old enough to choose for him/herself, usually seen as just before the age of puberty. Prior to the ceremony, the initiate has a ritual bath ( nahn ) inwardly cleansed by a sip of nirang (consecrated cow's urine). Fundamentally the rite consists of the investiture by the priest ( magi ) with the sacred shirt and cord, the sudre and ...

Naujote

Naujote  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(generally interpreted as ‘new birth’).The Zoroastrian initiation ceremony. The central conviction behind Zoroastrian ethics is the emphasis on human free will. Initiation, therefore, cannot take ...
Purity

Purity   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
307 words

...against intermarriage or in strict priestly homes against commensality with anyone who does not observe the purity laws, especially non-Zoroastrians ( juddins ). There are various rites of purification. For minor pollutions, the padyab , washing and saying the kusti prayers ( Naujote ), is all that is necessary. On special occasions, for example before initiations or weddings, the Nahn is necessary. This begins with the Padyab-kusti ; the symbolic eating of a pomegranate leaf and drinking of nirang to cleanse spiritually; the recital of the Patet , the...

Prayer

Prayer   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
590 words

...prayer both begin and end with ardas . Praise is expressed through kirtan . Out of all this, petition flows. Zoroastrianism There are two main types of Zoroastrian prayer: private and more public liturgies. Every Zoroastrian is expected to recite the kusti prayers ( naujote ) at least five times daily having first cleansed himself or herself physically (by washing). The duty of prayer is common to all, high or low, male or female. There is a series of Avestan prayers which each Zoroastrian is expected to learn by heart, the Yatha Ahu Vairyo ...

Zoroastrianism

Zoroastrianism   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
649 words

...material world. The Sasanian period is the only era in Zoroastrian history where there is clear evidence of the oppression of other religions. Whether this was royal fervour or Zurvanite teaching is not known, but there were attempts to convert or suppress Jews and Christians ( Naujote ). The 1,200 years of Zoroastrian imperial history came to an end in the 7th cent. ce with the rise of Islam. The last Zoroastrian king, Yazdegird III , fled and was killed by one of his own people in 652 . After the initial conquest, the imposition of Muslim rule on the...

Festivals and fasts

Festivals and fasts   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
2,110 words

...the founding of the khālsā in 1699 . Zoroastrianism For Zoroastrians there are six seasonal festivals ( gahambars ) which together with New Year (No Ruz) constitute an annual cycle of religious obligation for all Zoroastrians. Along with the sudre/kusti prayers ( Naujote ), they are in fact the only compulsory practices of the religion. They exhibit the traditional spirit of joyful worship of Ahura Mazda (misery is a sin in Zoroastrianism), focusing on hospitality, the sharing of food and drink in which everyone has the religious obligation to...

View: