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Monmouth's rebellion

(1685) An insurrection in south-west England against James II, led by the Duke of Monmouth, illegitimate son of Charles II. The Duke of Argyll led a revolt in Scotland against ...

Monmouth's rebellion

Monmouth's rebellion   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
31 words

...'s rebellion . The attempt in 1685 of the Duke of Monmouth to depose the new Catholic king, James II , was supported enthusiastically by Protestant craftsmen and labourers in Dorset and...

Monmouth's rebellion

Monmouth's rebellion   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
101 words

...'s rebellion The attempt in 1685 of the Duke of Monmouth to depose the new Catholic king, James II , was supported enthusiastically by Protestant craftsmen and labourers in Dorset and Somerset. Most of the local gentry did not join the rebellion. Monmouth was proclaimed king in Taunton, but was defeated at the battle of Sedgemoor. Over 500 of his followers were killed in battle; many others were hanged or transported to the West Indies in the terrible retribution that followed under Lord Chief Justice Jeffreys ( 1645–89 ). The ‘Bloody Assize’ has...

Monmouth’s Rebellion

Monmouth’s Rebellion (1685)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
107 words

...’s Rebellion ( 1685 ) An insurrection in south-west England against James II , led by the Duke of Monmouth, illegitimate son of Charles II. The Duke of Argyll led a revolt in Scotland against James and persuaded Monmouth to launch a rebellion in the south-west. He landed at Lyme Regis in Dorset, and was proclaimed king at Taunton, but could muster only limited support. He failed to take Bristol and, with forces inferior in training, experience, and equipment to the king’s army, was routed at Sedgemoor . Monmouth was captured a few days later and...

Monmouth's rebellion

Monmouth's rebellion  

(1685)An insurrection in south-west England against James II, led by the Duke of Monmouth, illegitimate son of Charles II. The Duke of Argyll led a revolt in Scotland against James and persuaded ...
Henry V

Henry V   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,163 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...in chivalric brotherhood: seeing the French regrouping, Harry orders the English to kill their prisoners. 4.7 Fluellen and Gower are horrified that the French have killed the English boys who were guarding the camp. Fluellen praises Harry, proud that the King was born in Monmouth, and makes a far-fetched comparison between Harry and Alexander the Great, likening Alexander’s killing of his friend Cleitus to Harry’s rejection of Falstaff. The King, angry to have heard of the slaughter of the boys, receives Montjoy, who concedes defeat. Fluellen...

1st earl of Melville, George Melville

1st earl of Melville, George Melville  

(1636–1707).Melville succeeded to his father's barony when he was 7. An ardent presbyterian from Fife, he was implicated in the Rye House plot and gave support to the Monmouth rising. In exile he ...
Bloody Assizes

Bloody Assizes  

Was the name given to the mass trials of Monmouth's rebels in 1685, presided over by Jeffreys and four other judges. The judges indicated that pleas of not guilty would invariably mean death ...
battle of Sedgemoor

battle of Sedgemoor  

A battle fought in 1685 on the plain of Sedgemoor in Somerset, in which the forces of the rebel Duke of Monmouth, who had landed in Dorset as champion of the Protestant cause and pretender to the ...
battlefields, historic

battlefields, historic  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Britain has relatively few historic battlefields compared with the continent of Europe. The country has not been invaded since 1066, so the battlefields since then are those of civil wars. The site ...
George Jeffreys

George Jeffreys  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
(1648–89).Notorious as the judge who presided at the Bloody Assizes, Jeffreys was a career lawyer who became conspicuous as an aggressive prosecutor and partisan judge. At political trials his ...
Patrick Sarsfield

Patrick Sarsfield  

(c. 1650–93).Jacobite earl of Lucan. Born to a catholic family, Sarsfield entered the Irish army in 1678. He then served in the English regiments which Charles II detached to fight in the army of ...
Mordred

Mordred  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(in Arthurian legend) the nephew of King Arthur who abducted Guinevere and raised a rebellion against Arthur.
Gorboduc

Gorboduc  

A: Thomas Norton and Thomas Sackville Pf: 1561–2, London Pb: 1565 G: Trag. in 5 acts with dumbshows and choruses; blank verse S: Ancient Britain C: 15m, 2f, chorus (4m)While still King of Britain, ...
James II

James II  

King of England and Ireland, James VII of Scotland, b. 14 Oct. 1633, 2nd s. of Charles I and Henrietta Maria; acc. 6 Feb. 1685; deemed to have abdic. 11 Dec. 1688; m. (1) Anne, da. of Edward Hyde ...
Charles Cornwallis

Charles Cornwallis  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
(1738–1805) commanding general of British forces in the southern campaign in the Revolutionary War, born in London. He was the 2nd earl Cornwallis, later marquis. In the Revolutionary War, Cornwallis ...
Daniel Defoe

Daniel Defoe  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1660–1731),born in London, the son of James Foe, a butcher. He changed his name to Defoe from c.1695. He attended Morton's academy for Dissenters at Newington Green with a view to the ministry, but ...
William III

William III  

(1650–1702),king of England, Scotland (as William II), and Ireland (1689–1702), prince of Orange. Appointed stadtholder of Holland and Zeeland, and captain‐ and admiral‐general of all the Dutch ...
Monmouth, James Scott, Duke of

Monmouth, James Scott, Duke of (1649–85)   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
96 words

..., James Scott, Duke of ( 1649–85 ) English noble , illegitimate son of Charles II . As captain general, Monmouth defeated the Scots at Bothwell Bridge ( 1679 ). Allied with the Earl of Shaftesbury , he became leader of the Protestant opposition to the succession of the Duke of York (later James II ). The discovery of a plot ( 1683 ) forced Monmouth into exile in Holland. Upon James' accession ( 1685 ), he launched a rebellion. Despite initial success, Monmouth lacked the support of the nobility and was defeated by the Duke of Marlborough at the...

Sedgemoor, Battle of

Sedgemoor, Battle of (6 July 1685)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
86 words

...Battle of ( 6 July 1685 ) The decisive battle of Monmouth’s Rebellion , fought near Westonzoyland in Somerset. Monmouth was blocked in his retreat from Bristol by the army of James II , commanded by Lord Feversham and John Churchill (later Duke of Marlborough ). Monmouth attempted a night attack to give his raw recruits some advantage over the professional royalist army, but his plans miscarried and he suffered a crushing defeat. The battle proved to be the last fought on English...

Monmouth

Monmouth   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... The town in Monmouthshire at the mouth of the Monnow, and also the surname of Henry V of England ( r.1413–22 ), who was born there. Monmouth’s Rebellion The disastrous final attempt of James, Duke of Monmouth ( 1649–85 ), the son of Charles II ’s mistress Lucy Walter ( 1630–58 ), to overthrow James II as champion of the Protestant religion. He landed at Lyme in 1685 and was hailed as king at Taunton and Bridgwater in Somerset but was routed by James II ’s army at Sedgemoor (6 July). Monmouth was executed and his rustic followers were dealt...

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