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Minerva

Subject: Music, Opera

(Monteverdi: Il ritorno d’Ulisse in Patria). Sop. Goddess who helps Ulisse to disguise himself as a beggar and return to his wife. Created (1640) probably by Maddalena Manelli.

Minerva

Minerva   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

... The Romans worshipped Minerva as a cognate of the Greek Athene and as part of a triad inherited from the Etruscans as Jupiter - Juno -Minerva (Etruscan...

Minerva

Minerva   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
24 words

... [Di] Roman goddess of wisdom and patroness of arts and crafts. Identified with the Greek Athena and thereafter considered a goddess of...

Minerva

Minerva   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Opera Characters (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Music, Opera, Performing arts
Length:
33 words

... ( Monteverdi : Il ritorno d’Ulisse in Patria ). Sop. Goddess who helps Ulisse to disguise himself as a beggar and return to his wife. Created ( 1640 ) probably by Maddalena Manelli...

Minerva

Minerva   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...Belisama [most brilliant]. More importantly, the cult of Minerva became conflated with that of the British healing goddess Sulis , especially at the spring at Bath, known as Aquae Sulis in Roman times. The name of the indigenous goddess, Sulis-Minerva or Sul-Minerva, always takes first place in inscriptions. The large gilded bronze head of Sulis-Minerva that survives at Bath, ripped from its torso with helmet severed, indicates that the goddess was portrayed there in classical dress. Minerva also appears to contribute to the conception of the British...

Minerva

Minerva ([Rom. Myth.])   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Reference and Allusion (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
110 words

... [Rom. Myth.] The goddess of handicrafts, wisdom, and also of war, identified with the Greek *Athene . She was also believed to have invented the flute. > A woman skilled in handicrafts, a wise woman, a woman playing the flute; a warlike woman ‘Thank you very much,’ said Oak, in the modest tone good manners demanded, thinking, however, that he would never let Bathsheba see him playing the flute; in this resolve showing a discretion equal to that related of its sagacious inventress, the divine Minerva herself. Thomas Hardy Far from the Madding...

Minerva

Minerva   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
36 words

... Roman goddess of the arts, professions and handicrafts, whose cult is believed to have originated in Etruria. She was identified with the Greek goddess Athena , and so became goddess of wisdom and later of...

Minerva

Minerva (Europe)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... Europe The Roman goddess of wisdom and the arts, identified with the Greek Athena. Her name may contain the same root as mens , meaning thought. Her cult was widespread in Italy, though only at Rome did she take on an extremely warlike character. There Minerva was represented with a helmet, shield, and a coat of mail; and the spoils of war were dedicated to...

Minerva

Minerva   Reference library

Herbert Jennings Rose and John Scheid

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
342 words

...on mons Caelius (the Caelian hill), which was called Minerva Capta by Ovid , from the taking of Falerii in 241 bc (Ov. Fast . 3. 835 ff.). But it seems that this name was derived from a statue captured in Falerii and offered to the Caelian Minerva (see Ziolkowski, Temples 112 ff.). A much more important cult lay extra pomerium (‘outside the pomerium ’, or religious boundary) on the Aventine hill; it was supposedly vowed in 263 or 262 bc (see Ziolkowski, Temples 109 ff.). The Aventine Minerva was of Greek origin and was the headquarters of a...

Minerva

Minerva   Reference library

Herbert Jennings Rose and John Scheid

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
386 words

...on mons Caelius ( see Caelius mons ), which was called Minerva Capta by Ovid , from the taking of Falerii in 241 bc (Ov. Fast. 3. 835 ff.). But it seems that this name was derived from a statue captured in Falerii ( see Faliscans ) and offered to the Caelian Minerva (see Ziolkowski, Temples 112 ff.). A much more important cult lay extra pomerium (‘outside the pomerium ’) on the Aventine ; it was supposedly vowed in 263 or 262 bc (see Ziolkowski, Temples 109 ff.). The Aventine Minerva was of Greek origin and was the headquarters of a guild...

Minerva

Minerva   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
114 words

... , an Italian goddess of handicrafts, widely worshipped and regularly identified with Athena . There is no trace of her cult in Rome before the introduction of the Capitoline Triad, where she appears with Jupiter and Juno in an Etruscan grouping. Apart from this she was worshipped in an ancient shrine on mons Caelius ( see caelius mons ) A much more important cult lay outside the pomerium on the Aventine ; it was supposedly vowed in 263 or 262 bc . The Aventine Minerva was of Greek origin and was the headquarters of a guild of writers and...

Minerva

Minerva   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... The Roman goddess, possibly of Etruscan origin, of wisdom and the patroness of the arts and trades. She was fabled to have sprung, with a tremendous battle cry, fully armed from the brain of jupiter . With juno and Jupiter she became part of the Capitoline triad. She was subsequently identified by the Romans with the Greek athene (Athena), and she is represented as being grave and majestic, clad in a helmet and with drapery over a coat of mail, and bearing the aegis on her breast. Phidias made a statue of her of ivory and gold 39ft (12m) high,...

Minerva Press

Minerva Press   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...recreation. The Minerva's development of the lending library as a profitable sideline of engravers, picture-framers, perfumers, jewellers, and confectioners expanded the possibilities of the book as an object of consumer desire [ see *consumerism, 19 ]. In pioneering new technologies of mass book production, the Minerva Press also became a focus of *copyright issues. The exuberant capacity of the Minerva Press novel for self- parody and self-advertisement attested to its pre-eminent status as a synonym for *novel [31] and *romance genres. A major...

Minerva Press

Minerva Press   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
87 words

... Press A publishing house in Leadenhall Street, London, established in 1773 by William Lane (? 1745–1814 ), using the name Minerva Press from 1790 until 1820 . Lane created a network of circulating libraries to distribute its output of mass-produced sentimental and Gothic fiction . Minerva published mainly female authors, including the Gothic novels recommended by Isabella Thorpe in Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey . Many works appeared anonymously, including some by Amelia Opie , William Godwin , Sydney Owenson (? 1776–1859 ), and Jane West...

Minerva Press

Minerva Press   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
145 words

...expanding network of *circulating libraries . Though Anna Maria Bennett and Regina Maria Roche appeared regularly in Lane’s lists, and Robert Bage’s satires also bore the firm’s imprint, many Minerva Press volumes were published anonymously or under pseudonyms. Graham Law D. Blakey , The Minerva Press (1939) D. A. McLeod , ‘The Minerva Press’, Ph.D. thesis (Alberta, 1997) ODNB (Lane,...

Mine'rva

Mine'rva   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
168 words

... Italian goddess of crafts and trade guilds, probably a native deity rather than an early borrowing from Greece, her name perhaps connected with meminisse , ‘to remember’. She was one of the three great Capitoline deities, the ‘triad’, together with Jupiter and Juno. She was worshipped in a shrine on mons Caelius and also had a temple on the Aventine, outside the city wall. Here the guild of tibia-players held a festival on the Ides (13th) of June, in the evening of which they dressed in masks and long robes and roamed the streets ( see Livius...

American Minerva

American Minerva (1793–1905)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
90 words

...Minerva ( 1793–1905 ), founded at New York by Noah Webster , its editor to 1803 , as a daily Federalist journal to combat French influences. The editor and Hamilton both wrote series of letters defending Jay 's Treaty. In 1797 the name was changed to the Commercial Advertiser, and later editors included R.C. Sands , Thurlow Weed , Parke Godwin , and William L. Stone . In 1905 the paper was combined with the New York Globe to become the Globe and Commercial Advertiser , which in turn was bought by the New York Sun in 1923...

owl of Minerva

owl of Minerva   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Philosophy (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
93 words

...of Minerva . Minerva, the Roman goddess of wisdom , was the equivalent of the Greek goddess Athena. She was associated with the owl, traditionally regarded as wise, and hence a metaphor for philosophy. Hegel wrote, in the preface to his Philosophy of Right : ‘The owl of Minerva spreads its wings only with the falling of the dusk.’ He meant that philosophy understands reality only after the event. It cannot prescribe how the world ought to be. Prof. Peter Singer G. W. F. Hegel , Hegel's Philosophy of Right , tr. T. M. Knox (Oxford,...

owl of Minerva

owl of Minerva   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
114 words

...of Minerva A traditional symbol of wisdom, most famously invoked in Hegel ’s remark at the end of the Preface to the Philosophy of Right : ‘when philosophy paints its grey in grey, then has a shape of life grown old. The owl of Minerva spreads its wings only with the coming of the dusk.’ Hegel means that the kinds of self-conscious reflection making up philosophy can occur only when a way of life is sufficiently mature to be already passing, but the doctrine neglects the fact that self-consciousness and reflection co-exist with activity. For example, an...

Franklin, Martha Minerva

Franklin, Martha Minerva (29 October 1870)   Reference library

Black Women in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
547 words

...Martha Minerva (b. 29 October 1870 ; d. 26 September 1968 ), nurse, founder of the National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses (NACGN) . Born in New Milford, Connecticut , to Henry J. Franklin and Mary E. Gauson Franklin , Martha graduated from Meriden Public High School in 1890 . Five years later, she entered the Woman’s Hospital Training School for Nurses in Philadelphia, one of the few black women to have access to such a nursing program. The vast majority of nursing schools either severely restricted or prohibited the admission of black...

Tarbell, Ida Minerva

Tarbell, Ida Minerva (1857–1944)   Reference library

The Encyclopedia of the History of American Management

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Business and Management
Length:
1,304 words

...Ida Minerva ( 1857–1944 ) Ida Minerva Tarbell was born in Erie County, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Franklin and Esther Tarbell . She died in Bethel, Connecticut on 6 January 1944 . After graduating from Allegheny College in 1880 , one of only five women students there, she taught in a seminary in Ohio and then was associate editor of The Chautauquan ( 1883–91 ). She then spent three years in Paris, which city she says she fell in love with at first sight, studying at the Collège de France and the Sorbonne, and supporting herself by writing...

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