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Mary Rowlandson

Subject: Literature

(c.1635–c.1678), daughter of John White, an early settler and wealthy proprietor of Lancaster, Mass., in 1656 married Joseph Rowlandson, a Congregational minister. During King ...

Rowlandson, Mary

Rowlandson, Mary (c.1635–c.1678)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Literature
Length:
181 words

...Rowlandson, Mary [ White ] ( c. 1635– c. 1678 ) , daughter of John White , an early settler and wealthy proprietor of Lancaster, Mass., in 1656 married Joseph Rowlandson , a Congregational minister. During King Philip’s War, when the Narragansett attacked Lancaster (Feb. 10, 1676), she was abducted by the Indians, who held her for 11 weeks and five days, until she was ransomed. Her account of this captivity was published in Cambridge ( 1682 ) as The Sovereignty & Goodness of God, Together with the Faithfulness of His Promises Displayed; Being a...

Rowlandson, Mary

Rowlandson, Mary (1635–1711)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Women's Writing in the United States

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
478 words

..., Mary (c. 1635–1711 ), captivity narrative writer. Mary, who was probably born in Somersetshire, England, migrated to the New World with John White, her father. She lived in Salem, Massachusetts, and later moved to Lancaster, Massachusetts, where she met Joseph Rowlandson, a minister, whom she married in 1656 . Suddenly, on the dawn of 10 February 1676 , her life changed. During Joseph Rowlandson's absence from Lancaster, Matocomet, the Wampanoag Indian leader, burned Lancaster and took captive Mrs. Rowlandson, her three children, and others....

Mary Rowlandson

Mary Rowlandson (ca. 1636–1711)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
126 words

...Mary Rowlandson ca. 1636 – 1711 I remember with shame how formerly, when I had taken two or three pipes, I was presently ready for another, such a bewitching thing it is; but I thank God he has now given me power over it; sure there are many who may be better employed than sucking a stinking tobacco-pipe. Mary Rowlandson was among those abducted by Indians who attacked Lancaster, Massachusetts, on February 10, 1676. The captives became pawns in a larger game—King Philip's War—but she was ransomed after eleven weeks and five days. During her captivity,...

Rowlandson, Mary [White]

Rowlandson, Mary [White] (1635–c.1678)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
173 words

..., Mary [White] (c. 1635–c.1678 ), daughter of John White , an early settler and wealthy proprietor of Lancaster, Mass., in 1656 married Joseph Rowlandson , a Congregational minister. During King Philip's War, when the Narragansett attacked Lancaster ( Feb. 10, 1676 ), she was abducted by the Indians, who held her for 11 weeks and five days, until she was ransomed. Her account of this captivity was published in Cambridge ( 1682 ) as The Sovereignty & Goodness of God, Together with the Faithfulness of His Promises Displayed; Being a Narrative of the...

Mary Rowlandson

Mary Rowlandson  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(c.1635–c.1678),daughter of John White, an early settler and wealthy proprietor of Lancaster, Mass., in 1656 married Joseph Rowlandson, a Congregational minister. During King Philip's War, when the ...
Publishing

Publishing   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,242 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...in person or solicited his support through importunate correspondence, his reception was rarely warm, occasionally tepid, and often cold. The arrogance and hauteur of the bookseller, brilliantly captured in Thomas *Rowlandson 's pen and wash drawing Bookseller and Author , was an authorial cliché and long-standing grievance. Still, Rowlandson's sneering bookseller, whose corpulent prosperity contrasts with the cringing, emaciated figure of the imploring author, is a caricature. Though there were booksellers who abused both their position and the writers...

Antiquarianism (Popular)

Antiquarianism (Popular)   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,164 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...employed in the cause of virtue and decorum, by holding up to public notice many offenders against both’. Just as he was drawn to the popular, almost universally readable art of caricature, which in the next decade was to rise to new heights with the work of * Gillray and * Rowlandson [ see *prints, 22 ], Grose liked another uncensored form of publication, the personal newspaper *advertisement . In A Guide to Health, Beauty, Riches and Honour ( 1785 ) he assembles an entertaining collection of these notices from London *newspapers and journals, to...

Indian Captivity Narratives

Indian Captivity Narratives  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Indian captivity narratives date back to the colonial period, most famously to Mary Rowlandson's A Narrative of the Captivity and Restauration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682). The genre was explored ...
Daughters

Daughters  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
In a creole culture, where marriage outside a group invariably threatens that group's ties to the country of origin, daughters are especially problematic. To maintain an English identity in North ...
Frontier Writing

Frontier Writing  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Because frontier literature begins with the first encounters by Europeans with the New World and continues well beyond the official closing of the frontier in 1890, and because every part ...
Indians

Indians  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
In addition to creating literary works of their own, like the Walam Olum, appear in American literature from the time of the earliest exploration and colonization, e.g. in Captain John Smith's ...
Susan Howe

Susan Howe  

(1937– ),American poet, born in Ireland, raised in Cambridge, Massachusetts; she became a visual artist in New York in the 1960s, working increasingly with texts, until a decision in the ...
New England Women's Writing

New England Women's Writing  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
New Englanders dominated the first three hundred years of American women's literature. Of the approximately twelve hundred writers in American Women Writers, a quarter grew up and/or resided for a ...
Captivity Narrative

Captivity Narrative  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Account of kidnapping by Indians of white persons, usually women, taken by long journeys into the wilderness. The tale of Mary Rowlandson (1682), the earliest example, is representative of New ...
fashion

fashion  

A currently accepted or popular style in a given field. Fashion, that is, apparel, accessories, and jewellery, is a huge industry in its own right. Marketing the fashion apparel of a haute ...
beauty

beauty  

The central place of beauty in Plato's thought is witnessed in the Dialogues Phaedrus and Symposium. The perception of beauty induces anamnesis, a recollection of previous acquaintance with the ...
motherhood

motherhood  

GreekWomen were deemed to have a right to marriage and children. Physicians maintained that intercourse and childbirth were necessary to female health and prescribed pregnancy to cure pathological ...
identity

identity  

All of us agree with Joseph Butler that everything is what it is and not another thing. The difficulty is to know when we have one thing and not two. A rule for telling this is a principle of ...
marriage

marriage  

Marriage is a lottery proverbial saying, mid 17th century, referring either to one's choice of partner, or more generally to the element of chance involved in how a marriage will turn out.Marriage of ...
Captivity Narrative

Captivity Narrative   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
158 words

...Narrative , account of kidnapping by Indians of white persons, usually women, taken by long journeys into the wilderness. The tale of Mary Rowlandson ( 1682 ), the earliest example, is representative of New England colonial texts concentrating on the Indians as sons of the Devil removing a daughter of Zion into Satan's lands, often considering it a judgment or test of the Lord. Later accounts, like that of John Williams ( 1707 ), telling of the seizure of a man, represent an 18th-century shift to a political point of view in presenting the French...

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