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Marianne Moore

Subject: Literature

(1887–1972), American poet, was editor (1925–9) of the Dial. Her first volume, Poems (1921), was followed by Observations (1924), Selected Poems (1935), The Pangolin, and Other ...

Moore, Marianne

Moore, Marianne (1887–1972)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
131 words

..., Marianne ( 1887–1972 ) American poet , born in Missouri . From 1925 to 1929 she was editor of The Dial . Her first volume, Poems ( 1921 ), was followed by Observations ( 1924 ), Selected Poems ( 1935 , with an introduction by T. S. Eliot ), The Pangolin, and Other Verse ( 1936 ), and other collections. Her Collected Poems appeared in 1951 . Moore's early work was well known in Britain, being admired by I. A. Richards . Combining urbanity with sophistication, her poems are composed with a strong sense of visual effect. In ‘Poetry’...

Moore, Marianne

Moore, Marianne (1887–1972)   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
44 words

..., Marianne ( 1887–1972 ) US poet . Her poetry is considered among the most distinguished US verse of the 20th century, with its wit, irony, and wide-ranging subject matter and its highly accomplished technical discipline. She received a Pulitzer Prize for Collected Poems ( 1951...

Moore, Marianne

Moore, Marianne (1887–1972)   Reference library

Anne Stevenson

The Oxford Companion to Modern Poetry (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...part of her published work. The oeuvre has been restored and augmented by The Poems of Marianne Moore (Penguin, 2003 ), ed. Grace Shulman . See also The Complete Prose of Marianne Moore (Penguin, 1986), ed. Patricia C. Willis , and The Selected Letters of Marianne Moore (Knopf, 1997), ed. Bonnie Costello . For her biography, see Charles Molesworth , Marianne Moore: A Literary Life (Atheneum, 1990) , and for criticism and context, see Marianne Moore: Women and Poet (National Poetry Foundation, 1991) ed. Patricia C. Willis . Anne...

Moore, Marianne

Moore, Marianne (1887–1972)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Women's Writing in the United States

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
1,053 words

...of Marianne Moore (1986). Taffy Martin , Marianne Moore: Subversive Modernist (1986). Grace Schulman , Marianne Moore: The Poetry of Engagement (1986). John Slatin , The Savage's Romance: The Poetry of Marianne Moore (1986). Margaret Holley , The Poetry of Marianne Moore: A Study in Voice and Value (1987). Patricia C. Willis , Marianne Moore: Vision into Verse (1987). Celeste Goodridge , Hints and Disguises: Marianne Moore and Her Contemporaries (1989). Charles Molesworth , Marianne Moore: A Literary Life (1990). Joseph Parisi , ed., Marianne...

Moore, Marianne

Moore, Marianne (1887–1972)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
80 words

..., Marianne ( 1887–1972 ) American poet , editor of The Dial from 1925 to 1929 . Her Selected Poems ( 1935 ) has an introduction by T. S. Eliot ; other collections include Poems ( 1921 ), Observations ( 1924 ), The Pangolin, and Other Verse ( 1936 ), and Collected Poems ( 1951 ). Combining urbanity with sophistication, her poems are composed with a strong sense of visual effect; she influenced the work of the poet Elizabeth Bishop...

Moore, Marianne

Moore, Marianne   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
5,203 words

...Dragon ( 1959 ) A Marianne Moore Reader ( 1961 ) The Arctic Ox ( 1964 ) Tell Me, Tell Me ( 1966 ) The Complete Poems of Marianne Moore ( 1967 ) Prose Predilections ( 1955 ) The Complete Prose of Marianne Moore ( 1986 ) Further Reading Bishop, Elizabeth . Efforts of Affection. In her Complete Prose . New York, 1984. A wonderful portrait of Moore in the middle years of her life. Costello, Bonnie . Marianne Moore: Imaginary Possessions . Cambridge, Mass., 1981. Brilliant close analysis of Moore's poems. Garrigue, Jean . Marianne Moore . Minneapolis,...

Moore, Marianne

Moore, Marianne   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

..., Marianne ( Marianne Craig Moore ) ( 1887–1972 ), American poet , born in St Louis, Missouri, educated at Bryn Mawr College; she grew up in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Her specialization in biology informs the many poems based on her observations of animals, which occasionally employ items of scientific vocabulary. In 1916 she became acquainted with W. C. Williams and the group of poets associated with the New York magazine Others ; in 1918 she moved to New York where she lived for the rest of her life. She worked as a teacher, a secretary, and a...

Moore, Marianne

Moore, Marianne (1887–1972)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Literature
Length:
323 words

...Moore, Marianne [ Craig ] ( 1887–1972 ), born in St. Louis , graduated from Bryn Mawr ( 1909 ), and lived mainly in New York City, where she edited The Dial ( 1925–29 ). She did not publish a book until she was in her mid-thirties, with the issuance of the neutrally titled Poems ( 1921 ), followed by the more aptly named Observations ( 1924 ). A long hiatus was followed by Selected Poems ( 1935 ), which T. S. Eliot in his Introduction declared to be “descriptive rather than lyrical or dramatic.” She herself said in the early poem titled “Poetry”...

Marianne Moore

Marianne Moore (1887–1972)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Modern Quotations (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
185 words

...0Marianne Marianne Moore 1887 – 1972 American poet O to be a dragon, a symbol of the power of Heaven—of silkworm size or immense; at times invisible. Felicitous phenomenon! ‘O To Be a Dragon’ (1959) O to be a dragon of silkworm size or immense I, too, dislike it: there are things that are important beyond all this fiddle. Reading it, however, with a perfect contempt for it, one discovers in it, after all, a place for the genuine. ‘Poetry’ (1935) I, too, dislike it beyond all this fiddle place for the genuine Nor till the poets among us can be...

Marianne Moore

Marianne Moore (1887–1972)   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
254 words

...0Marianne Marianne Moore 1887 – 1972 American poet She says ‘Men are monopolists of “stars, garters, buttons and other shining baubles.”’ ‘Marriage’ (1935) O to be a dragon, a symbol of the power of Heaven—of silkworm size or immense; at times invisible. Felicitous phenomenon! ‘O To Be a Dragon’ (1959) O to be a dragon of silkworm size or immense I, too, dislike it: there are things that are important beyond all this fiddle. Reading it, however, with a perfect contempt for it, one discovers in it, after all, a place for the genuine. ‘Poetry’...

Marianne Moore

Marianne Moore (1897–1972)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
253 words

...Marianne Moore 1897 – 1972 Verbal felicity is the result of art and diligence and refusing to be false. quoted by Louise Bogan, College English , Feb. 1953 Beauty is everlasting And dust is for a time. In Distrust of Merits , 1941 My father used to say “Superior people never make long visits.” Silence , in Collected Poems , 1935 It is human nature to stand in the middle of a thing. A Grave , in Collected Poems , 1951 Words are a great trap. answering a question from the audience, 92nd St. Y, New York City, 1968 The mind is an enchanting thing, is an...

Marianne Moore

Marianne Moore (1887–1972)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
422 words

...0Marianne Marianne Moore 1887 – 1972 American poet She says ‘Men are monopolists of “stars, garters, buttons and other shining baubles”— unfit to be the guardians of another person's happiness.’ ‘Marriage’ (1935), referring to Miss M. Carey Thomas ‘Men practically reserve for themselves stately funerals, splendid monuments, memorial statues, titles, honorary degrees, stars, garters, ribbons, buttons and other shining baubles, so valueless in themselves and yet so infinitely desirable because they are symbols of recognition by their fellow-craftsmen of...

Moore, Marianne [Craig]

Moore, Marianne [Craig] (1887–1972)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Writers and their Works (3 ed.)

..., Marianne [Craig] ( 1887–1972 ) American poet Observations ( 1924 ) Poetry The Pangolin, and Other Verse ( 1936 ) Poetry What Are Years ( 1941 ) Poetry Nevertheless ( 1944 ) Poetry Predilections ( 1955 ) Non-Fiction Like a Bulwark ( 1956 ) Poetry O To Be a Dragon ( 1959 ) Poetry Tell Me, Tell Me ( 1966 ) Poetry ...

Moore, Marianne Craig

Moore, Marianne Craig (1887–1972)   Quick reference

Who's Who in the Twentieth Century

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History
Length:
236 words

..., Marianne Craig ( 1887–1972 ) US poet and prominent figure in the US avant-garde literary scene of the mid-twentieth century. She received several prizes for her poetry, including the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry ( 1951 ). Moore was born near St Louis, Missouri, and studied biology at Bryn Mawr College, where the rigours of objective analysis undoubtedly affected her later poetic style. After teaching shorthand for four years, she moved to Greenwich Village, New York, in 1918 and worked over the next eleven years both as a schoolteacher and a library...

Moore, Marianne [Craig]

Moore, Marianne [Craig] (1887–1972)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
288 words

..., Marianne [Craig] ( 1887–1972 ), born in St. Louis, graduated from Bryn Mawr ( 1909 ), and lived mainly in New York City, where she edited The Dial ( 1925–29 ). She did not publish a book until she was in her mid-thirties, with the issuance of the neutrally titled Poems ( 1921 ), followed by the more aptly named Observations ( 1924 ). A long hiatus was followed by Selected Poems ( 1935 ), which T.S. Eliot in his Introduction declared to be “descriptive rather than lyrical or dramatic.” She herself said in the early poem titled “Poetry” that...

Moore, Marianne

Moore, Marianne   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
37 words
Marianne Moore

Marianne Moore  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1887–1972),American poet, was editor (1925–9) of the Dial. Her first volume, Poems (1921), was followed by Observations (1924), Selected Poems (1935), The Pangolin, and Other Verse (1936), and ...
Grace Schulman

Grace Schulman  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1935– ),was born Grace Waldman in New York City, the only child of a Polish-Jewish immigrant father and a seventh-generation American mother. In 1959 she married Jerome L. Schulman, a ...
Poetess in American Literature

Poetess in American Literature  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
In the nineteenth century, the term “poetess” was typically a conventional compliment to, or acknowledgement of, any female poet's femininity. During the twentieth century it became more often a ...
Carol Muske

Carol Muske  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1945– ),lives in Los Angeles, California, with her husband, actor David Dukes, and daughter. Los Angeles figures in Muske's work as a trope for the seduction of appearances; reality crosses ...

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