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Magdeburg

(archbishopric) Established by Otto I as a sign of Ottonian expansion into eastern territories, Magdeburg became an archbishopric in 968 as part of Otto’s plan to strengthen ties to the ...

Magdeburg

Magdeburg   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
63 words

... (archbishopric) Established by Otto I as a sign of Ottonian expansion into eastern territories, Magdeburg became an archbishopric in 968 as part of Otto’s plan to strengthen ties to the *papacy . Stephen Wagner M. Puhle , ed., Otto der Grosse, Magdeburg und Europa (2001). B. Schneidmüller and S. Weinfurter , eds, Ottonische Neuanfänge: Symposion zur Ausstellung ‘Otto der Grosse, Magdeburg und Europa’ ...

Magdeburg

Magdeburg   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
93 words

... City-port on the River Elbe; capital of Saxony-Anhalt, central Germany. In the 13th century, Magdeburg received a charter and prospered as a leading member of the Hanseatic League . During the 16th century, it was one of the centres of the Protestant Reformation . In 1631 , during the Thirty Years' War , Magdeburg was sacked and destroyed by fire. The city also suffered heavy bomb damage in World War 2. A major inland port, the Mittelland Canal links it to the Rhine and the Ruhr. Industries: iron and steel, scientific instruments, chemicals. Pop. (...

Magdeburg

Magdeburg   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
450 words

...). The importance of Magdeburg's role as centre of the Mission to the Slav lands, responsibility for which was legally vested in the emperor, was often emphasized by comparing Magdeburg to Constantinople (papal document of 20 April 967 ). The territory of the new archdiocese was mostly taken from that of the bishopric of Halberstadt. Its suffragans were Havelberg, Brandenburg , Meissen, Merseburg and Zeitz. The first archbishop was Adalbert of Magdeburg ( 968–981 ). After the death of Otto I who was buried there in 973 , Magdeburg lost considerable...

Magdeburg

Magdeburg   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Religion
Length:
739 words

...Nieuwkoop, 1978. The best source in English on Magdeburg's reformer. Olson, Oliver K. Theology of Revolution: Magdeburg, 1550–1551 . Sixteenth Century Journal 3.1 (1972), 56–79. Argues that the strict Lutheran Magdeburg Confession led to armed resistance. Scheible, Heinz . Die Entstehung der Magdeburger Zenturien . Schriften des Vereins für Reformationsgeschichte 183. Gütersloh, 1966. The standard work on the preparation of the Magdeburg Centuries . Schoenberger, Cynthia Grant . “The Confession of Magdeburg and the Lutheran Doctrine of Resistance.” Diss.,...

Magdeburg

Magdeburg (Saxony–Anhalt/Germany (Magadoburg))   Quick reference

Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Place Names (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...Magdeburg , Saxony–Anhalt/Germany (Magadoburg) Founded by Charlemagne in 805 with the name Magadoburg ‘Great Castle’ from the Old High German magado ‘great’ and burga ‘castle’, it being the capital of Otto I the Great (912-73), German King (936-73) and Holy Roman Emperor (962-73)....

Magdeburg

Magdeburg   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to German Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
169 words

... is the capital city (Landeshauptstadt) of Land Sachsen-Anhalt of the Federal Republic ( see Bundesrepublik Deutschland ). Formerly in the Prussian Province of Saxony (Provinz Sachsen), the city was from 1949 to 1990 in the DDR ( see Deutsche Demokratische Republik ). Its coat of arms dates from the early 16th c. and represents a maiden (Magd) with a virginal wreath. Magdeburg accepted the Reformation in 1524 . The most famous event in its history is the capture and sack of the city by Tilly's troops in the Thirty Years War ( 20 May 1631 , ...

Magdeburg

Magdeburg   Quick reference

Neil Morris

Dictionary Plus Social Sciences

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
99 words

...Magdeburg The capital of the state of Saxony-Anhalt, central east Germany, on the River Elbe. Founded as a trading settlement in ad 805 , it became a leading member of the Hanseatic League in the thirteenth century. Rebuilt after destruction by fire in 1631 , the city became capital of the Prussian province of Saxony in 1815 . Bombing devastated the city in World War II. As a major river port, it is linked to the Rhine and Ruhr rivers by the Mittelland Canal and is a centre of food processing, metalworking, and heavy engineering. Population ( 2011 ) 289,400...

Magdeburg

Magdeburg   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
3,586 words
Illustration(s):
1

...des Klosters Berge bei Magdeburg (Halle, 1879) E. von Niebelschütz : Magdeburg (Berlin, 1929) A. Brackmann : Magdeburg als Hauptstadt des deutschen Ostens im frühen Mittelalter (Leipzig, 1937) H.-J. Mrusek : Magdeburg (Magdeburg, 1959) C. Römer : Das Kloster Berge bei Magdeburg und seine Dörfer 968–1565 (Göttingen, 1970) G. Wentz and B. Schwineköper : Das Erzbistum Magdeburg. Das Domstift St. Moritz in Magdeburg , Germania Sacra, iv/1.1 (Berlin and New York, 1972) Der Bezirk Magdeburg , Dehio-Handbuch (E. Berlin,...

Magdeburg Centuries

Magdeburg Centuries   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... Centuries The first great protestant history of the Christian church, compiled in Magdeburg under the direction of Matthias Flacius Illyricus ( 1520–75 ). It was written in Latin and first published at Basle ( 1559–74 ) as the Historia Ecclesiae Christi , and takes the story to 1400...

magdeburg centuries

magdeburg centuries   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
209 words

... centuries or (German) magdeburger zenturien , The popular name for the Ecclesiastica historia secundum singulas centurias , the first Protestant history of the Church, which was published in Basel in thirteen parts between 1559 and 1574 ; the early volumes were published in German translation in Jena ( 1560–5 ). The project was financed by the Protestant princes of Germany. The title reflects the fact that it was composed in the Saxon city of Magdeburg and organized into periods of 100 years each. The Centuries is the work of a group of...

Centuriators of Magdeburg

Centuriators of Magdeburg   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
45 words

...of Magdeburg . The authors of the Historia Ecclesiae Christi ( 1559–74 ), a history of the Church divided by ‘centuries’. This depicted the pure Christianity of the NT as coming progressively under the power of the ‘Papal Antichrist’ until liberated by M. Luther...

Mechthild von Magdeburg

Mechthild von Magdeburg (c.1210–1282/94)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
70 words

...von Magdeburg ( c .1210–1282/94 ) Author of the first book of mystical revelations to be written in German. A *beguine counselled by *Dominicans , Mechthild began writing in 1250 and continued until her death at the convent of Helfta. Her book is remarkable for its imagery, lyricism, and striking authorial voice. Sara S. Poor Mechthild of Magdeburg , The Flowing Light of the Godhead , tr. F. Tobin (German original, 1990)...

Udo von Magdeburg

Udo von Magdeburg   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to German Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
153 words

...von Magdeburg , an anonymous Middle High German verse legend of some 800 lines, which was written in the 14th c. It recounts the life, death, and damnation of Archbishop Udo of Magdeburg, a fictitious prelate, whose story probably originated with Udo, Bishop of Hildesheim, in the late 11th c. and early 12th c. Udo, a poor scholar, is given wisdom and understanding by the Virgin Mary, who promises him that he shall be archbishop of Magdeburg; but as archbishop he neglects his duties and lives in sin with nuns and an abbess. He is summoned to a divine judgement...

Magdeburg, sack of

Magdeburg, sack of (1631)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

..., sack of ( 1631 ), a widely publicized ‘atrocity’ during the Thirty Years War . The imperial Catholic general Tilly placed the town of Magdeburg, a centre of Lutheranism, under close siege in March 1631 , reinforcing Pappenheim who had been there since the previous November. The imperial force of about 22,000 was resisted by a small force of Swedes commanded by von Falkenburg . The approach of a relief army under Gustavus Adolphus precipitated the all-out assault of 20 May. After fierce resistance lasting two hours during which von Falkenburg...

Adalbert of Magdeburg

Adalbert of Magdeburg   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Saints (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
196 words

...of Magdeburg ( d. 981 ), archbishop . Details of his early life are unknown, but he became a monk at St Maximin of Trier. The emperor Otto the Great and his English wife Edith founded a monastery at Magdeburg to provide a base for evangelizing the Slavs: this was a policy he favoured for both religious and political reasons. At the request of Olga of Kiev, a recently converted septuagenarian ruler, a Christian mission was sent there, headed by Adalbert . This mission ended in failure, not through Adalbert's fault, but because Olga's son Svyatoslav...

Magdeburg Doors, Novgorod

Magdeburg Doors, Novgorod (1153–4)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
104 words

... Doors, Novgorod ( 1153–4 ) Romanesque bronze doors of *Novgorod ’s *St Sophia cathedral. Made in *Magdeburg , they feature 26 panels with reliefs of Old and New Testament events, virtues and vices, and Frederick I ‘Barbarossa’, Bishop Alexander of *Płock , and the artisans Requin and Weissmut (the creators). A centaur and Avraam (an artisan?) are probably Novgorodian. Circumstances of the transfer to Novgorod are obscure, perhaps as booty from Swedish Sigtuna ( 1187 ) or as a gift from *Mindaugas following the sacking of Płock ( 1262 ). Michael...

Mechthild of Magdeburg

Mechthild of Magdeburg (c.1207–c.1282)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
107 words

...of Magdeburg ( c. 1207– c. 1282 ), author of a book of mystical revelations . Of noble Saxon family, she became a Beguine at Magdeburg. The various books of her visions, entitled Das fliessende Licht der Gottheit (‘The Flowing Light of the Godhead’), were written down between c. 1250 and 1282 ; they contain dialogues with the Lord, bridal mysticism, and trinitarian theology and eschatology. About 1270 she joined the community of Cistercian nuns at Helfta, where she made contact with St Mechthild of Hackenborn (with whom she has often been...

Mechthild von Magdeburg

Mechthild von Magdeburg (c.1212–82)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to German Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
72 words

...von Magdeburg ( c. 1212–82 , nr. Eisleben), who became a beguine c. 1235 and a Cistercian nun at Helfta near Eisleben c. 1270 , experienced mystical visions, which she recorded together with her thoughts and aspirations under the title Das fließende Licht der Gottheit . The Low German original has not survived, and her visions of Christ and the Holy Trinity are now known only in a High German version made by Heinrich von Nördlingen c. 1344...

Mechthild of Magdeburg

Mechthild of Magdeburg (c.1207)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
760 words

...Magdeburg oder das fliessende Licht der Gottheit , G. Morel (ed.), J. Münzer (tr.), Regensburg, 1869 (repr. Darmstadt, 1980). Revelationes Gertrudianae ac Mechthildianae, II , Paris, 1877, 435-643. M. Schmidt , Das fliessende Licht der Gottheit , Einsiedeln-Zurich-Cologne, 1955. “Das fliessende Licht der Gottheit” von Mechthilde von Magdeburg , H. Neumann (ed.), Munich, 1990–1993 (2 vol.). M. Schmidt , Das fliessende Licht der Gottheit, 2, neubearbeitete Übersetzung mit Einleitung und Kommentar , Stuttgart-Bad Cannstadt, 1995. Mechthild of Magdeburg ,...

Mechthild of Magdeburg

Mechthild of Magdeburg (1207–c.1282)   Reference library

Matthew Mills

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
470 words

...of Magdeburg ( c . 1207– c .1282 ) Author of a book of mystical revelations. Descended from a noble family in Saxony, she experienced visions from the age of 12 and left her family home c . 1230 to become a Beguine at Magdeburg under the spiritual guidance of the Dominicans . Books 1–5 of her visions, the first to be written by a mystic in German, were entitled Das fliessende Licht der Gottheit ( The Flowing Light of Divinity ) and were composed c . 1250–9 ; they contain dialogues with the Lord, bridal mysticism, as well as Trinitarian...

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