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Macedonian Dynasty

The Macedonian dynasty (867-1056) marked the apogee of the medieval Byzantine Empire. Its founder, Basil, a peasant born in Macedonia but of Armenian descent, claimed to be related to the ...

Macedonian Dynasty

Macedonian Dynasty   Reference library

Alexander Kazhdan

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
339 words
Illustration(s):
1

... Dynasty ( 867–1056 ), Byz. dynasty founded by Basil I , who came from an Armenian family that settled in Thrace or Macedonia. According to a legend, originated probably by Photios , the family was descended from the Arsacids, but in fact Basil's parents were simple peasants. He advanced rapidly thanks to his extraordinary physical strength and boldness, murdering his rival, Caesar Bardas , and then his protector Michael III , whose former mistress Eudokia Ingerina was Basil's wife. The Macedonian dynasty included direct male descendants of Basil...

Macedonian dynasty

Macedonian dynasty   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
505 words

... dynasty The Macedonian dynasty ( 867 - 1056 ) marked the apogee of the medieval Byzantine Empire . Its founder, Basil, a peasant born in Macedonia but of Armenian descent, claimed to be related to the Arsacids. He owed his fortune to Michael III whom he so charmed by his physical qualities and his aptitude for training horses that he made him co-emperor. Having assassinated his benefactor, he marked his reign by an active external policy, ridding himself of the Paulicians in the East. His successors Leo VI ( 886–912 ), Constantine VII (...

Macedonian Dynasty

Macedonian Dynasty  

The Macedonian dynasty (867-1056) marked the apogee of the medieval Byzantine Empire. Its founder, Basil, a peasant born in Macedonia but of Armenian descent, claimed to be related to the ...
Introduction to the Apocrypha

Introduction to the Apocrypha   Reference library

Martin Goodman

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
10,268 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...For the next 200 years Jewish history was continually affected by the intrigues and ambitions of Alexander's Macedonian successors. After a period of turmoil following Alexander's death, his generals eventually parcelled out his huge conquests among themselves. Of the great dynastic empires that thus came into existence by 301 bce , the two most to affect the Jews were the dynasty founded by Ptolemy I Soter, with its base in Egypt, and the rival dynasty of Seleucus I Nicator, which had essentially two main bases, one in Mesopotamia and the other in northern...

The Future of Culture in Egypt

The Future of Culture in Egypt   Reference library

Tāhā Husayn

Islam in Transition: Muslim Perspectives (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
2,262 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...tells us that she violently opposed the Persians and Macedonians, the latter being eventually absorbed into the local population. Egypt yielded to the Western and Eastern Roman rulers only under duress and had to be kept under continuous martial law. History further relates that she acquiesced most reluctantly even to Arab domination. The spirit of resistance and rebelliousness that followed the conquest did not subside until she regained her independent personality under Ibn Tūlūn and the dynasties that followed him. From earliest times Muslims have been well...

Between Alexandria and Antioch: Jews and Judaism in the Hellenistic Period

Between Alexandria and Antioch: Jews and Judaism in the Hellenistic Period   Reference library

Leonard J. Greenspoon

Oxford History of the Biblical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
18,478 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
2

... Alexander the Great's arrival in the east in 333 bce —along with hordes of Macedonians and Greeks whose cause he was championing—had a major impact on subsequent developments for the Jews, as for countless other peoples. But it is important not to overemphasize the extent of Alexander's impact. Greeks and other Westerners had been traveling through the east, primarily as traders and mercenaries, for centuries before the great Macedonian warrior launched his army. The interests of such individuals undoubtedly ran more in the direction of...

2 Maccabees

2 Maccabees   Reference library

R. Doran and R. Doran

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
20,060 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Jonathan ( 1 Macc 13:11 ), fight with Judas's successors. v. 18 should not read with the NRSV ‘agreed to what was possible’, but rather ‘what lies within my competence, I have agreed to’. The year 148 of the Macedonian Seleucid calendar is from Oct. 165 bce to Sept. 164 bce . Dioscorinthius has been interpreted as the first month in the Macedonian calendar, Dios, or the fifth, Dystros, or the eighth, Daisios. ( 11:22–6 ) Second Letter v. 23 is phraseology usual at the death of a king, and suggests a time near the accession of Antiochus V. The change to...

3 The Ancient Book

3 The Ancient Book   Reference library

Craig Kallendorf

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
7,021 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
2

...of the graffiti in Pompeii warn that many of the ‘new readers’ had absorbed little beyond the basics. 6.4 Libraries The first significant private libraries came to Rome as the spoils of war: in the 2 nd century bc Aemilius Paulus brought back the books of Perseus, king of Macedonia, and Sulla looted from Athens the library of Apellicon of Teos, which included many of Aristotle’s books. It quickly became fashionable to have a library in noble villas, with aristocrats like Cicero having books at home but also freely using the libraries of their friends. The...

Churches in Context: The Jesus Movement in the Roman World

Churches in Context: The Jesus Movement in the Roman World   Reference library

Daniel N. Schowalter

Oxford History of the Biblical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
17,885 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...a blind and lame man (Suetonius, Vespasian 7.2–3). These and other signs provided further assurance that Vespasian had divine approval to be emperor. When news came that Vitellius was dead, Vespasian moved on toward Rome to inaugurate a new imperial dynasty for himself and his sons. This Flavian dynasty would not last as long as the Julio-Claudian, but it would have a great impact on the history of the later empire and on the developing Christian churches. Once in power, Vespasian proved to be a ruler of stature and effectiveness. Suetonius...

The New Testament

The New Testament   Reference library

Margaret Davies

The Oxford Illustrated History of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
10,686 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
5

...the Bible is understood as a collection of writings brought together and given titles at times when Greek or Latin was used by Christian communities, or rather by the literate élite of those communities. Why are two ancient languages involved? In the fourth century bce , the Macedonian Greek-speaking warrior Alexander conquered Greece, Asia Minor, and the Middle East, including Syria, Palestine, the Persian empire, and Egypt. After his death, his Greek-speaking successors ruled these areas, and founded Greek cities. Hence, Hellenistic Greek, a later...

Antigonids

Antigonids  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The Antigonid dynasty, the last Macedonian dynasty in antiquity, was a remarkable group of monarchs. Its founder was Antigonus I, nicknamed Monophthalmus (the One-Eyed), a general under Alexander the ...
Zoe

Zoe  

(Ζωή), second daughter of Constantine VIII, empress (with her sister Theodora, 21 Apr.–12 June 1042); born ca.978, died Constantinople 1050.As heiress of the Macedonian dynasty, Zoe was wed to ...
Romanos II

Romanos II  

Emperor of the Macedonian dynasty (959–63); son of Constantine VII and Helen; born Constantinople 939, died Constantinople 15 Mar. 963.In Sept. 944 Romanos I married him to Bertha (Eudokia) ...
Muhammad Ali Dynasty

Muhammad Ali Dynasty  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Dynasty of Macedonian Ottoman origin that reigned in Egypt from 1805 until 1952. Founded by Muhammad Ali (d. 1849). Supported by religious scholars of al-Azhar University. Responsible for major ...
Kingdom of Tyre

Kingdom of Tyre  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Dynasty of Abi-BaalDynasty of Itto-BaalNotesChronologyTyrian dates, which are approximate, rest on a king-list from Josephus Against Apion I.117–26, Hebrew and Assyrian synchronisms, and other ...
Theophanes Continuatus

Theophanes Continuatus  

Or Scriptores post Theophanem, conventional title of a collection of chronicles preserved in a single 11th-C. MS, Vat. gr. 167. The collection encompasses 813–961 and consists of four independent ...
Genesios

Genesios  

(Γενέσιος), conventional name of the 10th-C. author of the anonymous “History of emperors” that is preserved in a single MS (Leipzig, Univ.Lib. gr. 16); an 11th-C. hand wrote the ...
Peter of Alexandria

Peter of Alexandria  

(not to be confused with the 3rd-C. martyr of the same name), 10th-C. author of a chronicle entitled A Brief Survey of Years, from Adam to the reign of Leo ...
Aigai

Aigai  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Site of the first capital of the Macedonian dynasty, c. 64 km south-west of Thessaloniki, Greece, now the village of Vergina. Excavations, begun in 1861 and recommenced in 1938, have ...
Amyntas

Amyntas  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Dynastic name in the royal house of the Macedonians. The most famous bearer of the name, Amyntas III, king of Macedon c. 393–370 bc, increased the power of his kingdom ...

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