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Lord Strafford Thomas Wentworth

(1593–1641) English statesman. A Member of Parliament from 1614, he entered the service of Charles I in 1628. Although he had previously opposed royal policies, he was a believer ...

Thomas Wentworth, Lord Strafford

Thomas Wentworth, Lord Strafford (1593–1641)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Political Quotations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
59 words

...0ThomasWentworth,Lord Thomas Wentworth, Lord Strafford 1593 – 1641 English statesman The authority of a King is the keystone which closeth up the arch of order and government which, once shaken, all the frame falls together in a confused heap of foundation and battlement. Hugh Trevor-Roper Historical Essays (1952); see nicolson authority of a king keystone which closeth arch of...

Thomas Wentworth, Lord Strafford

Thomas Wentworth, Lord Strafford (1593–1641)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
63 words

...0Lord Thomas Wentworth, Lord Strafford 1593 – 1641 English statesman The authority of a King is the keystone which closeth up the arch of order and government which, once shaken, all the frame falls together in a confused heap of foundation and battlement. Hugh Trevor-Roper Historical Essays (1952) ‘The Outbreak of the Great Rebellion’ authority of a king keystone which closeth arch of...

Lord Strafford Thomas Wentworth

Lord Strafford Thomas Wentworth  

(1593–1641)English statesman. A Member of Parliament from 1614, he entered the service of Charles I in 1628. Although he had previously opposed royal policies, he was a believer in firm government ...
Francis Annesley Mountnorris, Lord

Francis Annesley Mountnorris, Lord  

(1585–1660),best known for his struggle with Wentworth. Arriving in Ireland in 1606, he accumulated lands and offices, becoming secretary of state in 1618. He opposed Lord Deputy Falkland (1622–9) ...
Black Oath

Black Oath  

The popular name for the sworn abjuration of the Scots Presbyterian covenant. Scottish royalist settlers, orchestrated by Wentworth, requested that an oath be introduced for their countrymen as an ...
lord deputy

lord deputy  

Came into use as the term for the chief governor of Ireland during the reign of Henry VII. In some cases holders were nominally deputies to a lieutenant, often a ...
Preston

Preston  

Of Gormanston, Co. Meath, a Catholic noble family founded by Roger of Preston who arrived from Lancashire in 1326 to pursue a legal career in Ireland. His son Robert, who ...
Cranfield Commission

Cranfield Commission  

(1622),sent to Ireland by Lionel Cranfield, lord treasurer of England, when its government was close to bankruptcy and allegations of corruption widespread. Staffed by English and Irish experts, it ...
Dillon

Dillon  

The family supposedly originated with Sir Henry de Leon's coming to Ireland as Prince John's secretary in 1185. He was granted lands in Longford, Westmeath, and Kilkenny. This marcher ...
4th earl of Bedford, Francis Russell

4th earl of Bedford, Francis Russell  

(1593–1641).Bedford hoped to resolve the political crisis of early 1641, since he was acceptable to Charles I as well as the parliamentary leaders. In concert with his client John Pym, a key figure ...
Graces

Graces  

Concessions promised to Irish interest groups by Charles I but left largely unratified. The Old English used the war with Spain in 1625 to request concessions in return for subsidies. ...
rising of 1641

rising of 1641  

The rising commenced in Ulster on 22 October amid a constitutional and related economic crisis convulsing Charles I's multiple monarchy. There were three plots—a conspiracy by Rory O'More and Conor ...
defective titles

defective titles  

A Commission for Defective Titles was first issued by James I in 1606 to enable his subjects ‘to quietly and privately enjoy their private estates and possessions’. The main object ...
Castle Chamber

Castle Chamber  

This prerogative court, modelled on the English Star Chamber, reflected an early modern concern for social control as well as the centralizing power of the state. An intention to separate ...
Clanricard, Ulick Burke, 1st marquis of

Clanricard, Ulick Burke, 1st marquis of  

(1604–57).Clanricard died on his estates in Cromwellian England after an eventful career combining Catholicism and loyalty to the crown. He succeeded in the struggle, already joined by his father ...
Richard Boyle

Richard Boyle  

(1566–1643),1st earl of Cork, the most successful of the New English. A Kentish younger son who became deputy escheator of crown lands after achieving entry into official circles with ...
Sir James Ware

Sir James Ware  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1594–1666),the major Irish antiquarian of his age. Educated at Trinity College, Dublin, under Ussher, Ware became auditorgeneral (1632) and supported Wentworth and Ormond. His main interest was ...
1st duke of Ormond, James Butler

1st duke of Ormond, James Butler  

(1610–88).Ormond, a protestant and a leading member of the Anglo-Irish ascendancy, succeeded to the earldom in 1633. After the departure of Strafford from Ireland in 1640, Ormond became the ...
Sir Ralph Hopton

Sir Ralph Hopton  

(1596–1652).One of the most successful royalist commanders during the Civil War, Hopton was given a barony in 1643. In the Long Parliament, he initially opposed the king, voting for Strafford's ...
battle of Newburn

battle of Newburn  

1640.Though the battle of Newburn was little more than a skirmish, it helped to bring Charles I to the scaffold. The first Bishops' War in 1639 ended in negotiation, but the following year a large ...

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