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Littimer

Subject: Literature

In Dickens's David Copperfield, Steerforth's hypocritical valet.

Littimer

Littimer  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
In Dickens's David Copperfield, Steerforth's hypocritical valet.
prisons and penal transportation

prisons and penal transportation   Reference library

Leon Litvack

The Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,325 words

...offered superior diet and conditions to those in the workhouse; crime, he noted, seemed to have gained a ‘manifest advantage’ over poverty ( HW 27 April 1850 ). This critique found fictional expression in David Copperfield 's encounter with the ‘two interesting penitents’, Littimer and Uriah Heep ( DC 61). While Dickens was keen to expose the English Separate System's laxity, he was far more troubled by the excessive severity of its American counterpart, which he observed at the Eastern Penitentiary in Philadelphia in 1842 . He recorded his...

characters—originals

characters—originals   Reference library

David Paroissien

The Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,382 words

...chapter belonging to the eleventh monthly number, Dickens managed to undo the mischief he had created in the earlier chapter, albeit at the expense of artistic coherence. Beneath her lively manner, he discovers principles, makes Miss Mowcher responsible for the arrest of Littimer, and allows the dwarfish lady to lecture the reader about stature: ‘Try not to associate bodily defects with mental, my friend, except for a solid reason.’ The instant recognizability of Mrs Hill has an amusing counterpart in the woman on whom Dickens modelled Mrs Nickleby's...

servants and domestic work

servants and domestic work   Reference library

Valerie Purton

The Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,686 words

...He caricatures this in the innocent David and Dora 's ‘ordeal by servants’ in David Copperfield . Pip in Great Expectations takes on a page (‘the Avenger’) whose demands keep his master, as Pip remarks ruefully, ‘in bondage and slavery’ ( GE 26). On the other hand, Littimer, Steerforth's manservant in David Copperfield , attributes his own fall (he ends the novel in prison) to the follies of his master ( DC 61). Dickens can deal seriously too with the darker side of servants' influence, particularly in the rearing of children. He writes feelingly...

David Copperfield

David Copperfield   Reference library

Paul Schlicke

The Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
3,179 words

...Cottage to reclaim fallen women ( see also prostitutes ). Their emigration , along with the Micawbers and Mr Mell, dramatizes Dickens's belief in the possibility of starting a new life abroad (see ‘A Bundle of Emigrants' Letters’, HW 30 March 1850 ). The depiction of Littimer and Heep in prison is generally seen as a journalistic excrescence, based on his article ‘Pet Prisoners’ ( HW 27 April 1850 ) and on Carlyle's ‘Model Prisons’ ( Latter Day Pamphlets , 1 March 1850 ). His views on education and treatment of the insane feed into the...

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