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Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre

*Davenant's conversion in 1660–1 of Lisle's indoor tennis court in Portugal Street in London established the spatial arrangement used in British theatres for some 150 years. The proscenium ...

Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre

Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre (London)   Quick reference

An A-Z Guide to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...'s Inn Fields Theatre , London Originally Lisle's Tennis Court, built in 1656 and converted into a theatre by Sir William Davenant in 1661 , for the Duke's Men. It was the first public theatre to have a proscenium arch and to use variable scenery. On 28 August 1661 , Pepys saw Hamlet there, ‘done with scenes very well, but above all Betterton did the prince's part beyond imagination.’ Davenant died in 1668 , but his widow, along with Henry Harris and Thomas Betterton , continued to manage the theatre until the Dorset Garden Theatre opened...

Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre

Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre   Reference library

Gilli Bush-Bailey

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
174 words

...many areas had limited sight lines) while retaining an intimacy with the players which was central to Restoration theatre. Davenant's Duke's Company occupied the theatre until 1671 when they moved to Dorset Garden Theatre . The intimate ‘Little Theatre’ of Lincoln's Inn Fields was later home to the Players' Company managed by Barry , Bracegirdle , and Betterton ( 1695–1705 ). Successfully refurbished by John Rich in 1714 , it fell into disrepair and ceased to be a regular playhouse after 1732 . See also scenography . Gilli...

Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre

Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
171 words

...had limited sight lines) while retaining an intimacy with the players which was central to Restoration theatre. Davenant's Duke's Company occupied the theatre until 1671 when they moved to Dorset Garden Theatre. The intimate ‘Little Theatre’ of Lincoln's Inn Fields was later home to the Players' Company managed by *Barry , *Bracegirdle , and *Betterton ( 1695–1705 ). Successfully refurbished by John *Rich in 1714 , it fell into disrepair and ceased to be a regular *playhouse after 1732 . Gilli...

Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre

Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
543 words

...'s The Beggar's Opera . It was also at this theatre that Rich first appeared as Harlequin . In 1732 , for reasons that are not yet fully understood, Rich undertook the building of a new theatre in Covent Garden , and moved there in the autumn of that year. Lincoln's Inn Fields was then used mainly for music and opera, except in the season of 1736–7 and again in 1742–3 when Giffard was there after the closure of Goodman's Fields Theatre . The final performance took place in 1744 , and the old theatre then became, among other things, a barracks, an...

Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre

Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre  

Reference type:
Overview Page
*Davenant's conversion in 1660–1 of Lisle's indoor tennis court in Portugal Street in London established the spatial arrangement used in British theatres for some 150 years. The proscenium arch ...
Music

Music   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,344 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...all in a fog there’). The singer Henry Phillips ( 1801–76 ), who rose to sing for the Ancients, tells of ‘very miscellaneous’ semi-amateur concerts ( c. 1815 ) in a ‘large, dark, dingy room in Lincoln's-Inn Square’, with ‘songs, duets, instrumental solos on flutes, horns, bassoons, and pianofortes’, an amateur comic, and a separate pulpit for readings. And at a theatre in Berwick Street, Soho, near the instrument-makers' and musicians' lodgings, the amateur leader would start the overture beating three instead of four with ‘a complacent smile’, assisted by a...

Henry Harris

Henry Harris  

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Overview Page
(c.1634–1704),English actor of the Restoration period, accounted by some contemporary critics superior even to Betterton. He joined Davenant's company at the Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre in 1661, ...
Christopher Rich

Christopher Rich  

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Overview Page
(c.1657–1714)English manager. Taking control of the ailing patent company at Drury Lane around 1693, Rich is cast as the tyrannical villain of theatre history largely because he made the ...
Richmond

Richmond  

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Overview Page
Surrey, small town on the River Thames, not far from London, which became a fashionable resort after the opening of Richmond Wells in 1696. The first recorded theatrical performance was ...
John Downes

John Downes  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(fl.1661–1719)Prompter and bookkeeper for the Duke's, United, and Players' companies at Lincoln's Inn Fields in London, Downes is the author of Roscius Anglicanus (1708), an incomplete but invaluable ...
tennis-court theatres

tennis-court theatres  

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Overview Page
Both in Paris and in London in the mid-17th century, tennis-courts were converted into theatres. Among the most famous were the Illustre-Théâtre (1644), where Molière first acted in Paris, and ...
Edward Kynaston

Edward Kynaston  

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Overview Page
(1643–1712)English actor. One of the few boy actors to continue playing female roles after the Restoration, Kynaston's offstage performances extended to appearances in Hyde Park, where fashionable ...
box, pit, and gallery

box, pit, and gallery  

Reference type:
Overview Page
*Audience areas in the auditorium first established in English indoor playhouses of the seventeenth century, such as the first Drury Lane. The highest prices were charged for seats in a ...
Salisbury Court Theatre

Salisbury Court Theatre  

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Overview Page
A hall playhouse built in 1629 by Richard Gunnell in the Whitefriars precinct, south of Fleet Street in London. Gunnell was an actor hoping to emulate the two other hall ...
Lupino family

Lupino family  

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The family story begins with Georgius Luppino, a refugee from Bologna who arrived in Plymouth in 1634 with only his skills with puppets, and goes on to unverified tales of ...
Anthony Aston

Anthony Aston  

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(fl. first half of 18th century), actor and playwright.A vagabond player, he generally is considered to have been the first professional actor to appear on an American stage. In ...
Richard Leveridge

Richard Leveridge  

(1670–1758),English bass singer and composer. He is principally remembered for his incidental music (often wrongly attributed to Locke) for the Davenant adaptation of Macbeth (1702), though, ...
patent theatres

patent theatres  

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Overview Page
The Theatres Royal, Drury Lane and Covent Garden, which operate under Letters Patent, or Charters, given by Charles II in 1662 to Thomas Killigrew for Drury Lane and Sir William ...
Faust ballets

Faust ballets  

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Overview Page
The legend of Faust has been a recurringly popular theme in dance. In 1723 John Rich presented his ballet pantomime The Necromancer or the History of Dr Faustus at the Lincolns Inn Fields Theatre in ...
theatre Royal

theatre Royal  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Term applied to the two London theatres, Covent Garden and Drury Lane, which operate under Letters Patent granted by Charles II in 1662. These Patent Theatres originally had a monopoly ...

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