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Libet's delay

A period of approximately half a second between a person's skin being touched and the resulting conscious experience of being touched, although the brain receives the signal and responds ...

Libet’s delay

Libet’s delay n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...stimulus is delayed by about half a second. According to Libet, the reason why we do not notice the half-second delay is that our conscious experiences of sensations are antedated to the time of the evoked potentials, creating the illusion that the sensations are almost immediate. Also called the antedating of consciousness , backward referral of sensation , half-second delay in consciousness , or time delay in consciousness . See also readiness potential . [Named after the US physiologist Benjamin Libet ( 1916–2007 ) who reported the delay first in an...

Libet's delay

Libet's delay  

A period of approximately half a second between a person's skin being touched and the resulting conscious experience of being touched, although the brain receives the signal and responds to the ...
backward masking

backward masking  

A form of masking that occurs when perception of a stimulus called the test stimulus is reduced or eliminated by the presentation of a second stimulus called the masking stimulus which, in the case ...
readiness potential

readiness potential  

A negative event-related potential, across wide areas of both frontal lobes, the motor cortex, and the parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex, gradually increasing for approximately a second to two ...
consciousness

consciousness  

The state of being conscious (1, 2); the normal mental condition of the waking state of humans, characterized by the experience of perceptions, thoughts, feelings, awareness of the external world, ...
time delay in consciousness

time delay in consciousness n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...delay in consciousness n . Another name for Libet’s delay...

half-second delay in consciousness

half-second delay in consciousness n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...delay in consciousness n . Another name for Libet’s delay...

tactile illusion

tactile illusion n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...illusion n . Any illusion of touch. See Aristotle’s illusion , Libet’s delay , rubber hand phenomenon , sensory saltation , size–weight illusion , thermal grill illusion . Compare auditory illusion , visual illusion...

consciousness

consciousness n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...animals) self-awareness. See also access consciousness , altered state of consciousness , astonishing hypothesis , attention , autonoetic , blindsight , Chinese room , cognitive penetrability , controlled processing , functionalism , Gödel’s theorem , imagery , Libet’s delay , marginal consciousness , mental model , mindfulness , neodissociation theory , perception–consciousness system , phenomenal consciousness , phenomenology , readiness potential , stream of consciousness , strong AI , thing-presentation , topography , ...

touch

touch n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...and that the Austrian physiologist Max von Frey ( 1852–1932 ) identified in 1904 as warmth, cold, pain, and pressure, although pressure is now known to include sensations of texture and vibration ( pallaesthesia ). See also aesthesiometer , cold spot , haphalgesia , Libet’s delay , paraesthesia , pressure-sensitive spot , sensory saltation , tactile acuity , touch receptor , two-point threshold , warm spot...

reaction time

reaction time n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...depends on the detection of a difference in an objectively measurable perceptual dimension such as brightness, length, or weight. Also, especially in relation to animal behaviour, called latency , latent time , or response latency . See also Fitts' law , Hick's law , Libet's delay , personal equation , physiological time , readiness potential , subtraction method . RT abbrev...

backward masking

backward masking n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...by a dark ring surrounding the position of one of the letters, completely masking the letter and causing it to vanish from the array. When the test stimulus and masking stimulus do not overlap spatially, the phenomenon is called metacontrast . See also auditory masking , Libet's delay . Compare forward masking , simultaneous masking...

readiness potential

readiness potential n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...time for automatic responses to stimuli. According to research by the US neurophysiologist Benjamin Libet ( 1916–2007 ) published in the journal Behavioral and Brain Sciences in 1985 , conscious decisions lag 350 to 400 milliseconds behind the onset of the associated readiness potentials, suggesting that spontaneous voluntary action begins unconsciously and apparently undermining the conventional interpretation of free will. See also Libet's delay . Compare contingent negative variation . RP or BP abbrev . [Translated from the German ...

readiness potentials and human volition

readiness potentials and human volition   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Consciousness

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
2,175 words

...potential began some 800 ms or more before actual muscle contraction. Since causes cannot precede effects, Libet inferred that the conscious intention could not be the cause of the neural processes that culminate in action. Libet's result is often viewed as invalidating the *dualist view that conscious thoughts are the cause of action. Libet's experiment has been widely discussed. However, the method has often been criticized (see e.g. responses to Libet 1985 ). One important concern is the interpretation of a specific numerical value for the time of...

action, scientific perspectives

action, scientific perspectives   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Consciousness

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
2,815 words
Illustration(s):
1

...that, under normal circumstances, we are aware only of the predicted sensory consequences of movements. Further evidence for this proposal comes from studies by Libet demonstrating that subjects are aware of initiating a movement about 200 ms before the actual movement occurs ( Libet et al. 1983 , Haggard et al. 1999 ). Thus the awareness of initiating a movement must depend on the predicted sensory consequences of the movement, which is available before the sensory feedback from the movement. These studies suggest that we may only be aware of the...

temporality, philosophical perspectives

temporality, philosophical perspectives   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Consciousness

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
2,908 words
Illustration(s):
3

...rise to further puzzles. One such derives from Libet's work on how long it takes our brains to turn a perceptual stimulus into a conscious experience ( Libet 2004 ). Libet concluded that the delay is typically of the order of a full half‐second. If this is correct the implications are potentially significant: since we frequently react to events in less than half a second, it seems that our conscious decision‐making is often nothing more than an epiphenomenal after‐effect. For critical discussion of Libet see Dennett ( 1991 :Chs 5–6) and Pockett ( 2000...

multiple drafts model

multiple drafts model   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Consciousness

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,906 words

...a decision ‘by the brain’ to act (e.g. to move a limb) takes several hundred milliseconds to ‘rise’ to consciousness, creating an ominous picture of human agents as sequestered in outposts in their own brains and deluded about their ability to make a conscious decision (e.g. Libet 1985 , Wegner 2002 ). Or (3) They suppose that the initial transduction by sense organs of light and sound and odour and so forth into an unconscious neural code must be followed (somewhere in the brain) by a second transduction into some other medium, the ‘medium of...

PLEASURE

PLEASURE   Reference library

Charles Baladier, Clara Auvray-Assayas, Jean-François Balaudé, Barbara Cassin, Jean-Pierre Cléro, and Baldine Saint Girons

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Philosophy, Literature, Literary reference works
Length:
12,291 words

...as an adjective or a pronoun, “any” and, as an adverb, “at will,” “at discretion,” “as much as one wants,” comes from the verb belieben (to find good, to desire, to love) and from the substantive Liebe , words that derive from the Indo-European root that in Latin produced libet and then libido . This line of signification seems to be the very one that Freud follows when he considers the libido as the equivalent of hunger in the register of sexuality and defines it as the appetite for an object whose enjoyment satisfies the goal of the sex drive. Jung...

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