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Libanius

B. at Antioch (ad 314), died there (c.393), was a Greek rhetor and man of letters who embodied in his work many of the ideals and aspirations of the pagan Greek urban upper classes of late ...

Libanius

Libanius (314–c.393)   Reference library

Scott Bradbury

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...moment of Libanius’ life as a public figure. Prized by Julian for his oratory, Libanius was welcomed into the imperial palace for the only time in his life. Bad relations between Julian and the Antiochenes meant that his services as intercessor and mediator were much needed. However, the emperor’s death on campaign against Persia undid Libanius’ bright hopes and ushered in a period of danger and political eclipse. He remained deeply loyal to Julian’s memory and defended him in a series of speeches. Politically marginalized under Valens , Libanius became more...

Libanius

Libanius   Reference library

Peter Heather

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
620 words

...Foerster , 12 vols. (1903–27); A. F. Norman (ed.), Libanius' Autobiography (Or. 1) (1965), and Selected Works , 3 vols. (Loeb, 1969–77); S. Bradbury , Selected Letters of Libanius: from the Age of Constantius and Julian (2004). Studies P. Petit , Libanius et la vie municipale à Antioche au IVe siècle (1956), and Les Étudiants de Libanius (1957); J. H. W. G. Liebeschuetz , Antioch: City and Imperial Administration in the Later Roman Empire (1972), esp. 1–39. R. Cribiore , The School of Libanius in Late Antique Antioch (2007); I. Sandwell , ...

Libanius

Libanius   Quick reference

Robert Browning

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
485 words

... , born at Antioch in Syria ( ad 314 ), died there ( c. 393 ), was a Greek rhetorician and man of letters who embodied in his work many of the ideals and aspirations of the pagan Greek urban upper classes of late antiquity. He belonged to a wealthy Antiochene family of town-councillors, and after a careful education at home was sent to study in Athens ( 336–40 ). Thereafter he taught rhetoric successively at Constantinople ( 340/1–346 ) and at Nicomedia. Recalled to Constantinople by Constantius II , he was offered but declined a chair of rhetoric at...

Libanius

Libanius   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
302 words

... , b. at Antioch ( ad 314 ), died there ( c. 393 ), was a Greek rhetor and man of letters who embodied in his work many of the ideals and aspirations of the pagan Greek urban upper classes of late antiquity. He belonged to a rich Antiochene family ( see decuriones ), and after a careful education at home was sent to study in Athens. Thereafter he taught rhetoric in Constantinople and then in Nicomedia. Recalled to Constantinople by Constantius II , he was offered but declined a chair of rhetoric in Athens; in 354 he accepted a chair of...

Liba'nius

Liba'nius (ad 314–c.393)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
125 words

... (of Syrian Antioch , ad 314– c. 393 ) Greek rhetorician. He studied at Athens (336–40), and afterwards taught rhetoric at Constantinople (until 346) and at Nicomedia (in Bithynia, on the shores of the Propontis). Having declined a chair of rhetoric at Athens, in 354 he accepted instead a chair at Antioch, and remained there for the rest of his life. Although he remained a pagan, deeply attached to old ways, he had many distinguished Christian pupils, including John Chrysostom, and perhaps Basil the Great and Gregory of Nazianzus. Among his...

Libanius

Libanius  

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B. at Antioch (ad 314), died there (c.393), was a Greek rhetor and man of letters who embodied in his work many of the ideals and aspirations of the pagan Greek urban upper classes of late antiquity. ...
Transitions and Trajectories: Jews and Christians in the Roman Empire

Transitions and Trajectories: Jews and Christians in the Roman Empire   Reference library

Barbara Geller

Oxford History of the Biblical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
14,334 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the reign of Theodosius (379–95), Roman law granted the patriarch the titles of clarissimus and illustris , typically bestowed on the highest magistrates and on members of the senatorial order. The letters of Libanius include correspondence, dating from 388 to 393, between him and the patriarch Gamaliel V, suggesting that Gamaliel, like Libanius himself and the Christian bishops, was part of the cultured and powerful elite described above. Although Gamaliel was typical neither of the rabbis nor of the larger Jewish population, he reminds us...

Lakapenos, George

Lakapenos, George  

Writer and grammarian; fl. ca. 1297–1310/11, died before 1315.Lakapenos (Λακαπηνός) was probably a pupil of Maximos Planoudes and was active in literary circles in Constantinople under Andronikos II. ...
Polycrates

Polycrates  

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(c.440–370 bc)was an Athenian sophist best known for his (lost) fictitious ‘Accusation of Socrates’, written after 393/2 bc, and put in the mouth of Anytus. It may have stimulated Plato and Xenophon ...
Nikomedeia

Nikomedeia  

(Νικομήδεια, now Izmit), city of Bithynia, the residence of Diocletian and his successors until 330. The foundation of Constantinople brought decline, but Nikomedeia remained a provincial capital and ...
Ulpianus

Ulpianus  

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Of Ascalon taught rhetoric at Emesa and Antioch (1) in the reign of Constantine (ad 324–37) and wrote a number of declamations and rhetorical works (no longer extant). He is ...
Curia

Curia  

(βουλή), city council. In late antiquity curiae administered Cities and their territories, controlled local expenditure, sent embassies to the emperor, issued honorific decrees, and appointed urban ...
Daphne

Daphne  

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A park 9 km. (5 ½ mi.) south of Antioch (1), at natural springs supplying the city's water. Its inviolate temenos, with a temple of Apollo and Artemis, was dedicated ...
Aphthonios

Aphthonios  

(᾽Αφθόνιος), rhetorician from Antioch and pupil of Libanios; fl. late 4th to beginning of 5th C.Of his abundant works only a textbook of exercises (progymnasmata) and 40 fables (mythoi) ...
Asterios of Amaseia

Asterios of Amaseia  

Cappadocian churchman and writer, overshadowed by his more famous contemporaries, the Cappadocian Fathers; born between 330 and 335, died between 420 and 425 (according to Datema, infra [1970] xxiv). ...
Chorikios of Gaza

Chorikios of Gaza  

6th-C. Christian rhetorician. Chorikios (Ξορίκιος) was pupil and eulogist of Prokopios of Gaza. Forty-six declamations of various types survive. Apart from the historical value of his panegyric on ...
Hegesippus

Hegesippus  

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(c.390–c.325bc), Athenian statesman, contemporary with Demosthenes, nicknamed Krōbylos (‘Top-knot’) from his old-fashioned hairstyle, an obscure but not unimportant figure. He was already a man of ...
Basil of Caesarea

Basil of Caesarea  

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(in Cappadocia), c.ad 330–79 (the dates are debated but not disproved). He is honoured as the chief architect of monastic life in the Greek Church. His early education was completed at Athens, where ...
Eutropius

Eutropius  

The historian, probably from Gaul, who took part in Julian's Persian campaign (ad 363) and was magister memoriae of Valens, published a survey of Roman history (Breviarium ab urbe condita) ...
John Chrysostom

John Chrysostom  

(Ξρυσόστομος, “golden-mouth”), bishop of Constantinople (26 Feb. 398–20 June 404); saint; born Antioch between 340 and 350, died Komana 14 Sept. 407; feastday 13 Nov., translation of his relics 27 ...

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