You are looking at 1-20 of 1,287 entries  for:

  • All: Keynesianism x
clear all

View:

Overview

Keynesianism

The term Keynesianism owes its origins to the thought of John Maynard Keynes (1883–1946), a prolific British economist whose most influential work was The General Theory of Employment, ...

Keynesianism

Keynesianism   Reference library

Dictionary of the Social Sciences

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
393 words

..., Keynes's economics has developed in two additional directions. Post-Keynesians like Joan Robinson and Michal Kalecki concentrated on deriving theories of income distribution and capital accumulation from the Keynesian framework and studied its effects on national income . Post-Keynesian economics often blends Keynes's models with perspectives from classical political economy , with a focus on market systems in a historical and institutional context. New Keynesians , in contrast, are more committed to the neoclassical paradigm, while allowing...

Keynesianism

Keynesianism   Reference library

Theodore Rosenof

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Cultural and Intellectual History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...was dubbed the “neoclassical synthesis.” During the 1970s, this post–World War II view of Keynesianism fell into disrepute. The simultaneous appearance of recession and inflation—labeled “stagflation”—rendered Keynesian fiscal tools ineffectual. Accordingly, the form of Keynesianism widely accepted after 1945 stood indicted as simple-minded, and younger economists by and large abandoned it. Other economists, however, worked to retrieve or develop a form of Keynesianism more in keeping with Keynes's original theoretical and policy intent: to save capitalism...

Keynesianism

Keynesianism   Reference library

Theodore Rosenof

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
313 words

...was dubbed the “neoclassical synthesis.” During the 1970s, this post–World War II view of Keynesianism fell into disrepute. The simultaneous appearance of recession and inflation—labeled “stagflation”—rendered Keynesian fiscal tools ineffectual. Accordingly, the form of Keynesianism widely accepted after 1945 stood indicted as simpleminded, and younger economists by and large abandoned it. Other economists, however, worked to retrieve or develop a form of Keynesianism more in keeping with Keynes's original theoretical and policy intent: to save capitalism ...

Keynesianism

Keynesianism   Reference library

Oxford Companion to Australian Politics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
1,049 words

...synthesis’. In this view—as economists like Samuelson expounded—once Keynesian demand management techniques had been used to establish full employment, neoclassical theory could come into its own. Across three decades of post-war full employment, the pre-Keynesian vision of the economy was increasingly reasserted—with only ritual gestures towards Keynesian methods as being needed in the case of mass unemployment. The result was a style of economics called ‘Keynesian’ but really a Keynesianism stripped of its radical theory and tamed to adjust to the...

Keynesianism

Keynesianism   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Contemporary World History (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
206 words

...War II, but fell out of fashion owing to the inability of Keynesian demand management to cope with the economic recession of the 1970s, when rising inflation coincided with rising unemployment. During the late 1970s and the 1980s, it was replaced as the dominant economic theory by monetarism . Concerns raised by the progress of globalization , however, have raised awareness about the potential costs of unbridled monetarism. In response, economists have re-shaped Keynes's ideas into neo-Keynesianism, which developed into a popular economic theory during the...

Keynesianism

Keynesianism   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Politics of the World (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
2,121 words

...and confidence in the ability of Keynesians to “fine-tune” the economy to a noninflationary full-employment track reached its all-time high. Keynesianism fared less well in the 1970s, even though a conservative U.S. president—Richard M. Nixon —proclaimed that “we are all Keynesians now.” The stagflation of those years—in which unemployment coexisted with rising inflation rates—was a reality that could not readily be explained within the framework of the Keynesian model. Indeed, in the eyes of critics of Keynesianism, the very application of this doctrine...

Keynesianism

Keynesianism   Reference library

William J. Barber

The Oxford Companion to International Relations

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
2,118 words

...and confidence in the ability of Keynesians to “fine-tune” the economy to a noninflationary full-employment track reached its all-time high. Keynesianism fared less well in the 1970s, even though a conservative US president—Richard M. Nixon—proclaimed that “we are all Keynesians now.” The stagflation of those years—in which unemployment coexisted with rising inflation rates—was a reality that could not readily be explained within the framework of the Keynesian model. Indeed, in the eyes of critics of Keynesianism, the very application of this doctrine...

Keynesianism

Keynesianism   Reference library

William J. Barber

The Oxford Companion to Comparative Politics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
2,122 words

...and confidence in the ability of Keynesians to “fine-tune” the economy to a noninflationary full-employment track reached its all-time high. Keynesianism fared less well in the 1970s, even though a conservative US president—Richard M. Nixon—proclaimed that “we are all Keynesians now.” The stagflation of those years—in which unemployment coexisted with rising inflation rates—was a reality that could not readily be explained within the framework of the Keynesian model. Indeed, in the eyes of critics of Keynesianism, the very application of this doctrine...

Keynesianism

Keynesianism   Reference library

William J. Barber

The Oxford Companion to American Politics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
2,131 words

...of academic Keynesians and chaired by Walter Heller—successfully orchestrated a tax cut to attack unemployment and to raise the economic growth rate at a time when the federal budget was in deficit. The early results went according to expectation, and confidence in the ability of Keynesians to “fine-tune” the economy to a noninflationary full-employment track reached its all-time high. Keynesianism fared less well in the 1970 s, even though a conservative US president— Richard M. Nixon —proclaimed that “we are all Keynesians now.” The stagflation of...

Keynesianism

Keynesianism   Reference library

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
1,056 words

...and full employment. Military spending is politically less controversial (military Keynesianism). Keynesianism was born in a period of deep economic depression and rose to prominence in government economic policies after World War II. The immense war effort had demonstrated that raising effective demand promotes economic growth. A new depression was expected to be exploited politically by the communist camp, which had emerged as a rival power. Keynesianism led government and private institutions, particularly in Western Europe and the United States,...

military Keynesianism

military Keynesianism   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...Keynesianism a version of the macroeconomic theories of the economist John Maynard Keynes which holds that military spending by the so-called military-industrial complex is one means of using fiscal policy to manage the national...

Keynesianism

Keynesianism   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

... . The economic doctrine named after the British economist John Maynard Keynes ( 1883–1946 ). Broadly, Keynesian theories argue that high unemployment can be avoided by government intervention in the free-market economy, for example by manipulating demand through the use of fiscal and monetary policies. Keynesianism dominated the economic policies of many Western governments in the decades after the Second World War, but was later challenged by Friedmanism...

Keynesianism

Keynesianism noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
40 words
Keynesianism

Keynesianism noun   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
44 words
Keynesianism

Keynesianism  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The term Keynesianism owes its origins to the thought of John Maynard Keynes (1883–1946), a prolific British economist whose most influential work was The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and ...
Keynesian

Keynesian   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
292 words

... An economic theory relating to the ideas of British economist John Maynard Keynes ( 1883–1946 ) who was noted for his criticisms of neoclassical economics and his macro-economic theory. Keynes was influential in the formation of the post-war welfare state in the UK, and the term ‘Keynesianism’ is often used as a summary description of the social and economic policies underpinning it ( see Regulation Theory ). Keynes’ most famous work was The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money ( 1936 ) written during the Great Depression then...

military Keynesianism

military Keynesianism  

A version of the macroeconomic theories of the economist John Maynard Keynes which holds that military spending by the so-called military-industrial complex is one means of using fiscal policy to ...
Keynesian unemployment

Keynesian unemployment   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Economics (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics
Length:
88 words

...Keynesian unemployment Unemployment due to lack of effective demand for goods and services which people could have been employed to produce. Keynesian unemployment can be reduced by the use of monetary or fiscal policy to increase effective demand. Keynesian unemployment is distinct from classical unemployment , where wage rates are too high relative to productivity for employment to be profitable, and structural unemployment , where the unemployed lack the skills needed by prospective employers, or firms do not have the equipment needed to take on more...

Keynesian Economics

Keynesian Economics   Reference library

Theodore Rosenof

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Business, Labor, and Economic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Business and Management, Economics
Length:
1,145 words

...of the time, Alvin H. Hansen, Keynesianism's initial thrust was secular rather than cyclical. What Hansen saw as an underlying tendency toward stagnation caused by a secular deficiency of private investment required massive and permanent public investment to keep the economy humming. The third of a century after 1940 was dubbed the “Keynesian era,” given the growing dominance of Keynesianism in the economics profession and the impact of Keynesianism on public policy—the latter reaching its apogee in the 1960s. But the Keynesian economics of the time differed...

Keynesian economics

Keynesian economics   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...Keynesian economics An approach to adjustment of national economic planning to offset the harmful social consequences of recession or depression, proposed by the British economist John Maynard Keynes ( 1883–1946 ). Keynes advocated dealing with economic recession by deficit budgeting and injection of money into social programs aimed at boosting employment. ...

View: