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Kamakura

Subject: Religion

Major centre in Japan of Shinto shrines, and of Buddhist temples and monasteries. Due south of Tokyo, it was a fishing village which became the effective capital in 1185. The ...

Kamakura

Kamakura   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
183 words

... . Major centre in Japan of Shinto shrines, and of Buddhist temples and monasteries. Due south of Tokyo, it was a fishing village which became the effective capital in 1185 . The principal Shinto shrine, Tsurugaoka Hachiman-gu, is dedicated (as the name states) to Hachiman . Among the Zen monasteries, Kencho-ji is of particular importance, because Zen monks are still trained there. It was founded by Tao-lung in 1253 , and is built, like the classic monasteries of Kyōto , on the single-axis design. Engaku-ji (also Enkaku-ji), founded thirty years...

Kamakura Period

Kamakura Period   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
23 words

... Period . The period in Japan of the Kamakura shoguns, 1192– c. 1338 . It was a period when Buddhism flourished. See BUDDHISM IN JAPAN...

Kamakura shogunate

Kamakura shogunate   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
45 words

... shogunate The first feudal military shogunate established by Minamoto Yoritomo at the city of Kamakura, near Tokyo. The Hojo family were shogun regents after Yoritomo’s death. During the Kamakura shogunate ( 1192–1333 ) organized military power and the samurai ...

Kamakura period

Kamakura period   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
76 words

... period . A period of Japanese history, running roughly from 1185 to 1392 , during which several new schools of Buddhism arose, including zen , Pure Land, and Nichiren-derived sects. In response to sweeping social changes then taking place, such as the fall of the aristocracy and the rise of local landholding families, these new schools marked Buddhism's shift further away from the interests of the ruling classes and towards increased engagement with the masses. See also Japan...

Kamakura daibutsu

Kamakura daibutsu   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...Kamakura daibutsu . ( 鎌倉大佛 ‎ ). In Japanese, “Great Buddha of Kamakura”; a colossal bronze buddha image located at Kōtokuin , a Jōdoshū temple in Kamakura City, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. The Kamakura daibutsu is a huge bronze statue of Amida (S. Amitābha ) and is one of Japan’s most renowned buddha images. It is forty-four feet high and weighs about ninety-three tons. The first Kamakura shōgun, Minamoto no Yoritomo ( 1147–1199 ), saw the colossal buddha image at Tōdaiji ( see Nara daibutsu ) that had been restored in 1185 and, inspired, proposed...

Kamakura

Kamakura  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Major centre in Japan of Shinto shrines, and of Buddhist temples and monasteries. Due south of Tokyo, it was a fishing village which became the effective capital in 1185. The ...
Kamakura Period

Kamakura Period  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The period in Japan of the Kamakura shoguns, 1192–c.1338. It was a period when Buddhism flourished. See BUDDHISM IN JAPAN.
42 The History of the Book in Japan

42 The History of the Book in Japan   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
8,089 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
4

...texts to read is encountered. These were, of course, Buddhist texts in Chinese, as was true of almost all printing up to the late 16 th century. Most printing at this stage was conducted in Nara at the Kōfukuji, the family temple of the dominant Fujiwara family, but in the Kamakura period ( 1185–1333 ) printing spread to other parts of Japan. The monasteries of Mount Kōya began printing works of esoteric Buddhism and the writings of the monk Kūkai ( 774–835 ), such as his Sangō shiiki (printed in 1253 ), a comparative study of Buddhism, Confucianism,...

Ashikaga

Ashikaga  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
From the district in Kyoto where, after 1392, the shoguns lived)The shogunate in Japan from 1339 to 1573. In 1333 Ashikaga Takanju (1305–58) overthrew the Hojo, who had acted as regents for the ...
Minamoto Yoritomo

Minamoto Yoritomo  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
(1147–99)Japanese general, founder of the Kamakura shogunate. His family, like their rivals, the Taira, had risen to prominence when imperial factions called for military support. In 1160 the Taira, ...
Eizon

Eizon  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(1201–90).Esoteric practitioner (see esoteric Buddhism) and reformer of the Kamakura period in Japan. Dissatisfied with the lax moral practices of his times, he studied traditional Buddhist precepts ...
hongaku

hongaku  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Jap.). A term meaning ‘original’ or ‘innate enlightenment’. The concept originated in The Awakening of Faith (see Mahāyāna-śraddhotpāda śāstra), where it referred to the inherently enlightened and ...
Jishū

Jishū  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
A school of Pure Land Buddhism that developed during the Kamakura period in Japan under the leadership of Ippen (1239–89). This school teaches that the sole power to effect an individual's salvation ...
Tadaaki Otaka

Tadaaki Otaka  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Music
(b Kamakura, 1947).Japanese conductor. Teacher at Toho‐Gakuen Sch. from 1970. Prin. cond. Tokyo PO 1974–81, Sapporo SO 1981–6, BBC Welsh SO (known from 1993 as BBC National Orchestra of Wales) ...
Tonsei

Tonsei  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Jap.).Retreating from the world, the Buddhist practice of world-renunciation; tonsei-sha is one who has renounced. After the Kamakura period, tonsei became a more formal group of those who simply ...
Gorinsotoba

Gorinsotoba  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Jap., ‘sotoba [stūpa] with five sections’).Tombs (which became common after the Kamakura period in Japan) with five stone sections, of different shapes, placed on top of each other.
Gosan

Gosan  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
‘Five mountains’ (Chin., wu-shan),the federation of Chʾan/Zen monasteries, in groups of five, especially of Hangchou, Ming-chou, and then in Japan of Kamakura and Kyōto. Because monasteries were ...
Hōjō Masako

Hōjō Masako  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
(1157–1225),administrator and stabilizer of Japan's first warrior government, the Kamakura Shogunate (c. 1183–1333). Masako's authority and long‐lasting influence far surpassed her significance as ...
Nampo Jōmyō

Nampo Jōmyō  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(1235–1308).Major figure in establishing Rinzai Zen in Japan. He started training under Lan-hsi in Kamakura, and in 1259 travelled to China where he studied under Hsü-t'ang Chih-yü, from whom ...
sōhei

sōhei  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Jap.). During the period of the Tendai school's ascendancy from the 10th to the early 17th centuries, it had extensive landholdings and influence with the aristocratic classes. In order to protect ...

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