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Justinian's codification

Is a term loosely used to describe the three volumes (Codex, Dīgesta or Pandectae, Institutes) in which Justinian tried to restate the whole of Roman law in a manageable and consistent ...

Justinian's codification

Justinian's codification   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
872 words

...'s codification is a term loosely used to describe the three volumes ( Codex , Dīgesta or Pandectae , Institutes ) in which Justinian tried to restate the whole of Roman law in a manageable and consistent form, though this restatement, which runs to over a million words, is too bulky and ill‐arranged to count as a codification in the modern sense. Within a few months of becoming emperor, Justinian ordered a commission of ten, mostly present or recent holders of public office, to prepare a comprehensive collection of imperial laws including those in...

Justinian's codification

Justinian's codification   Reference library

Tony Honoré

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,431 words

...'s codification is a term loosely used to describe the three volumes ( Codex , Digesta or Pandectae , Institutiones ) in which Justinian ( ad 527–65 ) tried to restate the whole of Roman law in a manageable and consistent form, though this restatement, which runs to over a million words, is too bulky and ill-arranged to count as a codification in the modern sense. Ninety years after the Theodosian Code of 438 a new codex was needed to collect the laws enacted in the intervening period. Justinian, with a keen sense of his predecessors' neglect...

Justinian’s codification

Justinian’s codification   Reference library

Tony Honoré

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,295 words

...’s codification is a term loosely used to describe the three volumes ( Codex , Digesta or Pandectae , Institutiones ) in which Justinian ( ad 527–65 ) tried to restate the whole of Roman law in a manageable and consistent form, though this restatement, which runs to over a million words, is too bulky and ill-arranged to count as a codification in the modern sense. Ninety years after the Theodosian Code of 438 a new codex was needed to collect the laws enacted in the intervening period. Justinian, with a keen sense of his predecessors’ neglect and...

Justinian's codification

Justinian's codification  

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Is a term loosely used to describe the three volumes (Codex, Dīgesta or Pandectae, Institutes) in which Justinian tried to restate the whole of Roman law in a manageable and consistent form, though ...
Plautius

Plautius  

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(RE 60),a Roman lawyer of the later 1st cent. ad, known only through excerpts in Justinian's Digest (see Justinian's codification) from commentaries on his work by L. Neratius Priscus ...
Callistratus

Callistratus  

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(RE Suppl. 3 225–9),a provincial Roman lawyer of the reign of Septimius Severus (ad 193–211) whose name points to a Greek background. Besides dealing with the provincial governor's edict ...
Aelius Marcianus

Aelius Marcianus  

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(RE 88)a lawyer of the early 3rd cent. ad, probably from the eastern provinces. Mainly a teacher, he does not seem to have given responsa (consultative opinions). His extensive ...
Cervidius Scaevola, Quintus

Cervidius Scaevola, Quintus  

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(RE 1)a leading Roman lawyer of the later 2nd cent. ad, probably came from Carthage and, through his wife, had a close connection with Nemausus (Nîmes). Perhaps a pupil ...
Proculus, Sempronius (?)

Proculus, Sempronius (?)  

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(RE 9a)a Roman lawyer of the mid-1st cent. ad, perhaps from Spain, who gave his name to the Proculian school, which emphasized principle and consistency, in contrast with that ...
Herennius Modestinus

Herennius Modestinus  

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(RE 31)a lawyer of the first half of the 3rd cent. ad and a pupil of Ulpian, had connections in Pontus (northern Turkey). In Caracalla's reign he consulted Ulpian ...
Julius Julia

Julius Julia  

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Etc. For Roman personal names in ‘J’ (not a letter of the Latin alphabet) see under ‘I’, except for Julian, Justin, Justinian, and Juvenal.
Justinian

Justinian  

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History
(483–565),Byzantine emperor 527–65, husband of Theodora. Through his general Belisarius he regained North Africa from the Vandals, Italy from the Ostrogoths, and Spain from the Visigoths. He codified ...
institutes

institutes  

This was one of the titles given to elementary textbooks of Roman law. The best‐known work of this kind is the Institutes of Gaius (2), which was taken by Justinian as the basis of his own ...
rates of interest

rates of interest  

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As in modern, industrial society, the ancient world had a complex of rates of interest, varying across time and space. There, however, the similarity ends: ancient interest rates are more ...
Tribonian

Tribonian  

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The main architect of Justinian's codification of Roman law in the 6th cent. ad, was a lawyer from Side in Pamphylia who practised as an advocate and rose to be magister officiorum (master of ...
Theodosian Code

Theodosian Code  

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A collection of Roman imperial constitutions of general application from the time of Constantine to that of Theodosius II. Assembled and edited on Theodosius' instructions, it was promulgated in 438. ...
Hagia Sophia

Hagia Sophia  

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Religion
The church at Constantinople, dedicated to the ‘Holy Wisdom’ (i.e. the Person of Christ), was built under Justinian and consecrated in 538. Its chief feature is the huge dome which crowns the ...
Simplicius

Simplicius  

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(6th c. ad)Neoplatonist commentator on Aristotle. Simplicius was a member of the Academy of Athens at the point at which it was finally closed by Justinian in 529. He was taught by Ammonius, and ...
Caecilius Africanus, Sextus

Caecilius Africanus, Sextus  

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(RE 29)a Roman lawyer of the mid-2nd cent. ad and pupil of Iulianus probably came from Thuburbo Minus (mod. Tebourba) in Tunisia. He was dead when Gellius (Noctes Atticae ...
constitutions

constitutions  

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The generic name for legislative enactments by Roman emperors: edicts, decrees (judicial decisions), rescripts (written answers to officials or petitioners).

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