You are looking at 1-20 of 30 entries  for:

  • All: James Silk Buckingham x
clear all

View:

Overview

James Silk Buckingham

Subject: Literature

(1786–1855), English journalist, founder of the Athenœum, and member of Parliament, toured the U.S. (1837–40), which he described favorably in America: Historical, Statistic, and ...

Buckingham, James Silk

Buckingham, James Silk (1786–1855)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
62 words

..., James Silk ( 1786–1855 ) Author , traveller , and social reformer . Buckingham was born near Falmouth, Cornwall, and spent his youth at sea. He founded the Calcutta Journal in 1818 and the Athenaeum in 1828 . He served as MP for Sheffield 1832–7 . He published many travel books on the Middle East, North America, and Europe, and, in 1855 , two autobiographical...

Buckingham, James Silk

Buckingham, James Silk (1786–1855)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
34 words

..., James Silk ( 1786–1855 ), English journalist, founder of the Athenœum, and member of Parliament, toured the U.S. ( 1837–40 ), which he described favorably in America: Historical, Statistic, and Descriptive (9 vols., 1841–43...

James Silk Buckingham

James Silk Buckingham  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1786–1855),English journalist, founder of the Athenœum, and member of Parliament, toured the U.S. (1837–40), which he described favorably in America: Historical, Statistic, and Descriptive (9 vols., ...
Athenaeum

Athenaeum  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1828–1921),J. S. Buckingham's literary review. The founder wished the journal to become the resort of thinkers, poets, orators, and other writers. Dilke was editor 1830–46, and the list of ...
Athenaeum

Athenaeum   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...to its present premises in 1830 . An older club of the same name in Liverpool, famous for its proprietary library, was founded in 1797 . (Its full members, limited to 100, are actually known as ‘proprietors’.) The literary review called The Athenaeum was founded by James Silk Buckingham in 1828 and was incorporated with The Nation in 1921 , which merged with the New Statesman in 1931 (which merged with New Society in 1988...

Athenaeum

Athenaeum   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
207 words

... ( 1828–1921 ) James Silk Buckingham 's literary review, followed a general monthly magazine of this name ( 1807–9 ). The founder wished the journal to become a true ‘Athenaeum’, the resort of thinkers, poets, orators, and other writers, and he attacked the Quarterly Review for the political bias of its literary criticism. Co‐proprietors included at various times John Hamilton Reynolds , Thomas Hood , and Allan Cunningham . Charles Wentworth Dilke ( 1789–1864 ) was editor 1830–46 , and the list of contributors in the 19th century included ...

Tradescant, John the elder

Tradescant, John the elder   Reference library

Maggie Campbell-Culver

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...mulberry Morus rubra , with a view (misguidedly) of establishing a silk weaving industry in England promoted by King James I. In 1614 Tradescant began working for Sir Edward Wotton of St Augustine's Palace, Canterbury, and during 1618 travelled with a diplomatic mission to Russia, botanizing en route; he returned with the Arctic rose ( Rosa acicularis ) and the cones of a larch, probably Larix sibirica , from which he raised the tree. By c .1623 he was gardener to the Duke of Buckingham ( 1592–1628 ) at New Hall near Chelmsford and in this capacity he...

Emidy, Joseph Antonio

Emidy, Joseph Antonio (c.1775–1835)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Black British History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
301 words

...welcomed into Cornish social circles. Attempts to raise his profile in London with sponsors such as Johann Peter Salomon ( 1745–1815 ) failed, owing to fears concerning prejudice against his race. Emidy died in Truro in 1835 . Philip Herbert Buckingham, James Silk , ‘Emidy, a Negro Musician’, in Buckingham , The Black Perspective in Music (1973) Wright, Josephine , ‘Early African Musicians in Britain’ in Rainer E. Lotz and Ian Pegg (eds.), Under the Imperial Carpet: Essays in Black History 1780–1950 (1986) See also Music 1: Classical...

mulberry

mulberry   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...In the 16th and 17th centuries attempts were made to establish silk industries in Europe, including England. James I had 4 acres (1.6 hectares) of mulberry trees planted where Buckingham Palace now stands. According to Roach ( 1985 ): For a brief period there seemed a hope that Britain might be able to produce at least some of her requirements of silk. The king and the whole royal family so persevered in feeding their silk-worms and preparing thread that the Queen had enough silk, which she wound herself, to make some yards of taffeta, which were used...

Digges, Dudley

Digges, Dudley (1583–1639)   Reference library

The Biographical Dictionary of British Economists

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics
Length:
584 words

... represented Kent. He became an important political figure, and was often at the centre of parliamentary opposition to James I and Charles I. In 1627 he was again imprisoned for a speech giving offence to the king, but was released after making an apology. He was prominent among the opposition to Charles’s minister, the Duke of Buckingham, and was a lifelong friend of George Abbot, Archbishop of Canterbury and a leading opponent of Buckingham. Digges was also one of the principal figures behind the Petition of Right in 1628 . From 1636 until his death he...

Athenaeum

Athenaeum   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
714 words

.... Founded 2 January 1828 by James Silk Buckingham , this weekly, sixpenny, sixteen-page publication reviewed some of Trollope 's novels. A Wednesday paper, it incorporated the Literary Chronicle and Weekly Review , a Saturday paper, which had begun in 1819 . The earlier publication was almost entirely composed of book reviews or materials related to books and authors, as are some journals and literary supplements today. The popularity of reviews of current literature resulted from the high price of novels, Just when the public's appetite for...

American Notes for General Circulation

American Notes for General Circulation   Reference library

F. S. Schwarzbach

Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,123 words

...Notes for General Circulation As Dickens readied himself to set off for the United States aboard the steamship Britannia early in January 1842 , he studied several recent accounts of travel in America —those of James Silk Buckingham , Frederick marryat , and Harriet martineau ( see travel ; travel literature ). No doubt, like any eager traveller, he was deciding what places to visit, preparing himself for new experiences, learning about local customs and manners, and so on. But almost as certainly he was thinking already about the travel book...

Scotland, Patricia Janet

Scotland, Patricia Janet (1955– )   Reference library

Nadia Ali

Dictionary of Caribbean and Afro–Latin American Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,106 words

...Brown appointed Scotland as the first female attorney general for England and Wales. She later recalled feeling somewhat embarrassed by all the ensuing attention. Within the same period, she received a number of honorary doctorates in the law from various universities, such as Buckingham, Cambridge, Cardiff, East London Leicester, and Westminster. The New Nation newspaper voted her one of the top 100 black Britons. In 2008 The Guardian named Baroness Scotland the most powerful black woman in the United Kingdom. In September 2009 , while still serving as...

Athenaeum, the

Athenaeum, the   Reference library

The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
1,581 words

...the Founded by James Silk Buckingham , its first editor, in January 1828 , the Athenaeum , with its focus upon literature , music, the arts and science , soon established itself as a highly influential literary weekly, having in its early years combined with the London Literary Chronicle and the London Weekly Review . After some initial editorial instability, with Frederick D. Maurice and John Sterling , both former Cambridge Apostles and romanticists, each doing a stint of about a year as editor, Charles Wentworth Dilke , the weekly's...

Herrick, Robert

Herrick, Robert   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
2,805 words

...the second section. There is evidence that Herrick became known in London in the 1620s: the poet Mildmay Fane addressed two poems to him there, and in 1625 Richard James in The Muses Dirge deplored the fact that the death of James I had not been lamented by “Some Jonson , Drayton , or some Herrick .” In 1627 Herrick and Weekes were chaplains to George Villiers , the duke of Buckingham, on the doomed expedition to La Rochelle to relieve French Protestants. Herrick probably continued in the duke's service until the latter's assassination in 1628 ....

Travel literature in English

Travel literature in English   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
3,305 words

...studies counterbalancing her rambles towards Lake Huron in search of fellow-intellectuals like Colonel Talbot, and of Natives beyond the sphere of Toronto, during her eight-month stay in Upper Canada. Politics preponderated after the Act of Union of 1841 , in books like James Silk Buckingham's Canada, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the other British provinces in North America (London, 1843 ). Garrison life in Sir Richard Bonnycastle's The Canadas in 1841 (London, 1841 ) and Canada and the Canadians in 1846 (London, 1846 ; rpr. 1969 ), in J. E....

Safety Regulations for Shipping

Safety Regulations for Shipping   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
3,297 words

...regulated the emigrant trade. Until mid-century, however, disquiet about shipping casualties generally prompted investigation rather than legislation. In 1836 the Select Committee on the Causes of Shipwrecks, initiated by humanitarian reformer and member of Parliament James Silk Buckingham , identified these casualties as the result of poor vessel construction and repair, improper and excessive loading, distortions in design resulting from the then system of tonnage measurement, incompetent masters, drunkenness, owners’ disregard for safety as a result of...

Jezreel

Jezreel   Reference library

Norma Franklin

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Archaeology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Archaeology, Religion
Length:
3,699 words

...Yet in 1538 , just nine households were recorded; in 1597 , the number dropped to four. A century later the population had grown, and Zerin was described as having some 150 houses, occupied by both Muslims and Jews. The village prospered, and in 1815 the traveler James Silk Buckingham described about 50 dwellings around a high, modern building. Victor Guérin visited in 1870 and noted that the local sheik resided in the tower, which also served as a manzal , a secure overnight resting place for travelers. The remainder of the village consisted of...

England

England   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Northern Renaissance Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
19,563 words
Illustration(s):
2

...de Maecht ( d 1655 ). The first tapestries woven at Mortlake were copies of an antique series originally purchased by Henry VIII. Between 1620 and 1623 sets of Vulcan and Venus (London, St James's Pal., Royal Col.) and the Twelve Months (London, V&A) were woven for the Prince of Wales and George Villiers, Marquis of Buckingham (later 1st Duke of Buckingham). This repertory was expanded in 1623 when Charles managed to purchase from Genoa the original Acts of the Apostles cartoons by Raphael (London, V&A). The task of executing new working cartoons...

England

England   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
27,569 words
Illustration(s):
2

...the Durham embroideries, the stole and maniple of St Cuthbert ( 909–16 ; Durham, Cathedral Treasury). By the 13th century gold embroideries on grounds of twill-woven silk ( see Opus anglicanum ) were appearing in inventories throughout Europe, and the silk grounds were beginning to be replaced with linen, which was entirely covered with delicate, figurative embroidery worked with coloured silks in split stitch and with gold thread in underside couching (e.g. Syon cope). Quite unlike the ecclesiastical vestments, by which opus anglicanum is almost entirely...

View: