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Jacobitism

Was a series of political movements which supported the restoration of the exiled house of Stuart after James II had been ousted from the throne at the Glorious Revolution in 1688 and had ...

Jacobitism

Jacobitism   Quick reference

Lincoln Allison

A Concise Oxford Dictionary of Politics and International Relations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
141 words

... Jacobites were the followers of James II (Latin: Jacobus ), deposed in the ‘Glorious Revolution’ of 1688–9 , and his heirs. There was some overlap between Jacobitism and the early Tories; Jacobites rejected the succession arrangements of 1689 and 1714 , whereas Tories tended to be doubtful and troubled about them. During the Hanoverian period the main areas of support for the Stuart ‘Pretenders’ were outside England, principally in the Highlands of Scotland. The Jacobite cause was effectively dead after the last and greatest of rebellions, the...

Jacobitism

Jacobitism   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
293 words

...where Jacobitism was strongest, the episcopalian church had been disestablished at the Glorious Revolution, and subsequently many episcopalians became Jacobites. Jacobitism in Scotland also became a refuge for many who opposed the Union with England in 1707 . That Scotland was central to Jacobitism is shown by the two main risings which took place in 1715 and 1745 . Many Highland chiefs and clansmen, who did battle for the Stuart cause, paid for their loyalty with their lives. Few English Jacobites came out in support of either rebellion. Jacobitism was...

Jacobitism

Jacobitism   Reference library

Clyve Jones

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
607 words

...to Anne , refused to recognize the Hanoverian succession and turned to Jacobitism. In Scotland, where Jacobitism was strongest, the episcopalian church had been disestablished at the Glorious Revolution, and subsequently many episcopalians became Jacobites. Jacobitism in Scotland became a refuge for many who opposed the Union with England in 1707 . It also appealed to the lower, even the criminal, elements of society, as a form of social protest. That Scotland was central to Jacobitism is shown by the two main risings which took place in 1715 and 1745 ....

Jacobitism

Jacobitism   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
474 words

... , support for the Stuart dynasty, following the revolution of 1688 . James II and his son James Francis Edward ( 1688–1766 ), otherwise James III or ‘the Old Pretender’, maintained a court in exile while their supporters, relying on the backing of France or other sympathetic powers, plotted the recovery of the British and Irish thrones. There was a minor Jacobite rising in Scotland, the main centre of British Jacobitism, in 1708 , a larger insurrection there and in northern England in 1715 , and projected invasions, in each case aborted, in ...

Jacobitism

Jacobitism   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Scottish History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
2,578 words

.... Yet care is needed when ascribing Highland support for Jacobitism to a simple desire to perpetrate feud against the house of Argyll. In contrast to the actions of MacColla in the mid‐1640s, clan levies did not use the cloak of Jacobitism to devastate Campbell estates. Moreover, hostility to the Campbells would hardly explain the Jacobitism of the Campbells of Breadalbane or the MacKenzies of Seaforth in 1715 —such powerful clans were beyond the reach even of the house of Argyll. Clearly, Jacobitism was a complex phenomenon that had its origins in a diverse...

Jacobitism

Jacobitism  

Was a series of political movements which supported the restoration of the exiled house of Stuart after James II had been ousted from the throne at the Glorious Revolution in 1688 and had fled to ...
East Asia

East Asia  

The involvement of Scots in East Asia was one of their most remarkable overseas ventures. Trade between Europe and China, pioneered by the Portuguese in the late 15th century, was ...
Scots colleges

Scots colleges  

Were founded on the Continent, as it was impossible to establish in Scotland the seminaries decreed by the Council of Trent for training priests. The survival of the Roman Catholic ...
William Hamilton

William Hamilton  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Of Bangour (1704–54) Scottish Jacobite patriot and poet, who commemorated the battle of Gladsmuir in an ode and fought at Culloden. He is chiefly remembered for his song ‘The Braes ...
Clancarty

Clancarty  

Earldom held by the MacCarthys of Muskerry. Donough MacCarthy (1594–1665), Viscount Muskerry, combined Gaelic descent with Old English politics, supporting Ormond (his brother‐in‐law) in the ...
Jane Barker

Jane Barker  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1652–1732),poet and novelist, from Lincolnshire. Her verse was published as Poetical Recreations (1688). She lived in France after the 1688 Revolution. She was virtually blind from the 1690s, and ...
Dillon

Dillon  

The family supposedly originated with Sir Henry de Leon's coming to Ireland as Prince John's secretary in 1185. He was granted lands in Longford, Westmeath, and Kilkenny. This marcher ...
art, Highland

art, Highland  

A widely recognized concept of Highland art is witness to a distinctive visual and aesthetic tradition; powerful, persistent, and conservative in character, it gives the impression of belonging in a ...
dress, Highland

dress, Highland  

A distinctive style of dress and selection of garments with large tartan plaid and close‐fitting breeches became the hallmark of Highland society at least from the 16th century onward, and ...
siege of Derry

siege of Derry  

(18 Apr.–31 July 1689),in the Williamite War. Despite the earlier defiance of the Apprentice Boys, Derry's open allegiance to William III began only on 21 March, when the ship ...
Preston

Preston  

Of Gormanston, Co. Meath, a Catholic noble family founded by Roger of Preston who arrived from Lancashire in 1326 to pursue a legal career in Ireland. His son Robert, who ...
Savage

Savage  

A long‐established family which came to Ulster with John de Courcy and received large estates around Coleraine in the early 13th century. When the de Burgo (see Burke (de Burgh)) ...
conformity

conformity  

A legal procedure whereby converts from Catholicism to the Church of Ireland, having read a public recantation of former religious errors and taken Anglican communion, registered their change of ...
government after the Union

government after the Union  

1707–c.1750.One of the peculiarities of the Union of 1707 was that little thought was given to how the new British state would work. As far as Scotland was concerned ...
government and administration

government and administration  

1. the age of management;2. the age of individualism;3. the age of the British state.1. the age of management;2. the age of individualism;3. the age of the British state.[...]

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