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Industrial Workers of the World

Created in Chicago in 1905 as a revolutionary industrial union, the iww and its members, nicknamed ‘Wobblies’, organized minorities, immigrants, women, and unskilled workers ignored by ...

Industrial Workers of the World

Industrial Workers of the World   Reference library

Cynthia Gwynne Yaudes

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
627 words
Illustration(s):
1

... Workers of the World . Two hundred fifty radical laborites met in Chicago in 1905 to inaugurate the Industrial Workers of the World ( IWW ), a union based on the ideal of industrial democracy and the principles of Marxist class conflict. This “Continental Congress of the Working Class” sought to recruit immigrant, nonwhite, female, and migrant workers, all of whom had been excluded from the craft unions of skilled workers organized by the American Federation of Labor. Opposing such exclusivity within mainstream labor, the IWW sought to create “one...

Industrial Workers of the World

Industrial Workers of the World   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Australian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
221 words

... Workers of the World was formed at a gathering in Chicago in 1905 of socialists and industrial militants dissatisfied with existing trade unions, who sought a new organisation free of occupational and national divisions. It practised revolutionary industrial unionism and rejected attempts to reform capitalism through political action. The origins of the term used to describe its adherents, ‘the Wobblies’, are not known. Critics suggested the initials IWW stood for ‘I Won't Work’; in fact they were indefatigable in their agitation, defiant in their...

Industrial Workers of the World

Industrial Workers of the World   Reference library

David R. Roediger and revised by Gerald Ronning

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Business, Labor, and Economic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... Workers of the World Founded in Chicago in 1905 , the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), or Wobblies, counted its membership only in the tens of thousands even at its peak. However, from 1906 until the early 1930s, its combination of revolutionary unionism, tactical experimentation, racial inclusiveness, and cultural creativity enabled the IWW to influence organized labor out of proportion to its numbers. Inspired by European theorists of anarcho-syndicalism and by the growth of low-wage, unskilled, and insecure jobs within American industry,...

Industrial Workers of the World

Industrial Workers of the World   Reference library

Mark Leier

The Oxford Companion to Canadian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
204 words

... Workers of the World . Created in Chicago in 1905 as a revolutionary industrial union, the iww and its members, nicknamed ‘Wobblies’, organized minorities, immigrants, women, and unskilled workers ignored by conservative craft unions . But its ultimate aim was a revolution that would create a new society with neither bosses nor government. This revolution would be brought about by direct action, sabotage, and the general strike, not the ballot box. Thus the iww was closer to anarchism and syndicalism than to socialism or communism. The iww ...

Industrial Workers of the World.

Industrial Workers of the World.   Reference library

David R. Roediger

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
493 words

...Industrial Workers of the World. Founded in Chicago in 1905 , the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) counted its membership only in the tens of thousands even at its peak. However, from 1906 until the early 1930s, its combination of revolutionary unionism, tactical experimentation, racial inclusiveness, and cultural creativity enabled the IWW to influence organized labor out of proportion to its numbers. Inspired by European theorists of anarcho-syndicalism and by the growth of low-wage, unskilled, and insecure jobs within American industry, the IWW...

Industrial Workers of the World

Industrial Workers of the World   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Contemporary World History (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
154 words

...Industrial Workers of the World ( IWW ) A revolutionary anarcho‐syndicalist trade union in the USA, founded in 1905 . Nicknamed ‘the Wobblies’, it attempted to attract migrant, unskilled workers in addition to the existing membership made up largely of militant western miners. Its membership peaked at around 60,000 in 1912 , but after conducting an unsuccessful silkworkers' strike in Paterson, New Jersey, in 1913 , its influence declined. The IWW was also fundamentally weakened by perennial controversies between its moderate, social‐democratic wing,...

Industrial Workers of the World

Industrial Workers of the World   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latinos and Latinas in the United States

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,267 words

... Workers of the World . The Industrial Workers of the World ( IWW ) was one of the most important radical organizations in the United States in the twentieth century. A group of radical labor unionists, anarchists, and Socialists founded the IWW in 1905 . The IWW (whose members were called Wobblies) hoped to organize all workers, regardless of race, ethnicity, sex, or skills. The vision of the IWW went beyond demands for better wages. In fact, the preamble to its constitution calls for “abolition of the wage system.” At its height the IWW boasted...

Industrial Workers of the World

Industrial Workers of the World   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
35 words
Industrial Workers of the World

Industrial Workers of the World   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
48 words
Industrial Workers of the World

Industrial Workers of the World   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
74 words
Industrial Workers of the World

Industrial Workers of the World  

Created in Chicago in 1905 as a revolutionary industrial union, the iww and its members, nicknamed ‘Wobblies’, organized minorities, immigrants, women, and unskilled workers ignored by conservative ...
Industrial History

Industrial History   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4,499 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of life in which work at the handloom alternated with the tasks on the farm. The great majority were now specialist workers, living and working in towns, and their traditional products had been replaced by cloths made solely from cotton. Historians have shown that the progress of industrial change varied considerably, even in the textile trades. In the woollen and worsted industries across the Pennines weaving long remained a domestic craft, moreover one that expanded to match the output of the spinning mills. In the West Riding of Yorkshire the...

Industrialization

Industrialization   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,380 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...extent was industrialization purchased at the price of a fall in material living standards? To an extent, the steam has gone out of this debate. It is now partially agreed that there was scope for some rise in material living standards even in the first phase of industrial growth before 1850 . The experience of particular families and groups of workers is still difficult to assess because of the nature of the evidence. There are very few records of actual hours and days worked by individuals, or detailed evidence of expenditures on food, housing, and other...

Family and Society

Family and Society   Quick reference

Ralph Houlbrooke

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,144 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...work by many of the leading scholars in the field. Valerie Fildes (ed.), Women as Mothers in Pre‐Industrial England ( 1990 ), developed the innovative work of Dorothy McLaren on lactation and breastfeeding and its effects on family size. Most of the above books place due emphasis on the importance of women's work and of their contribution to the household economy. Pioneering studies of the subject were Alice Clark, Working Life of Women in the Seventeenth Century ( 1919 , 1982 , 1992 ), and Ivy Pinchbeck , Women Workers and the Industrial Revolution...

Labour History

Labour History   Quick reference

John L. Halstead

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,401 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...through the first half of the 19th century, that historians speak of the formation of the ‘working class’. Third, the third quarter of the 19th century witnessed industrial maturity and has inspired debate about the ‘labour aristocracy’. Fourth, the period of the rise of the labour movement with a distinctly modern character began with the revival of socialism around 1883 and continued until the emergence by 1923 of Labour as the ‘alternative governing party’ of British politics. Fifth, the First World War and the Russian Revolution were followed by a...

Land

Land   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,951 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...on the model of imperial conquest. In 1803 Sir John Sinclair ( 1754–1835 ), President of the Board of Agriculture, urged his class: ‘Let us not be satisfied with the liberation of Egypt, or the subjugation of Malta, but let us subdue Finchley Common ; let us conquer Hounslow Heath , let us compel Epping Forest to submit to the yoke of improvement.’ And beyond the borders of the islands of Britain, the colonial production of commodities significantly affected the lives of agricultural workers. The example of the consumption and production of sugar...

The Characteristics of Islamic Economics

The Characteristics of Islamic Economics   Reference library

Āyatullāh Mahmūd

Islam in Transition: Muslim Perspectives (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
3,392 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...center of human life on natural resources and has not entrusted them either to the hands of powerful capitalists or to power of the evolution of the means of production. From the Islamic point of view the one who must have the natural resources which are the basis of human life is the worker, to the limit of his labor and always preserving the right of the society. . . . Sixth, since natural resources, earth, water, forests, woods, lakes and mines are the foundation of life for human beings and all other animals, if the limitations on the rights and benefits...

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,520 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of Scripture was said to be ‘Redeem the Time’. The secular world, too, was during this period finding temporal precision both easier to achieve and more desirable. E. P. Thompson has famously argued for the growing influence of the clock, internalized within the time-consciousness of worker and employer alike. Contestation over this area of culture intensified as the pace of life increased with technological change and the imperatives of trade: Robert *Owen , for example, encountered persistent resistance to the use of a factory time-clock from workers at...

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