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Heraclides Ponticus

4th cent. bc philosopher of the Academy. Born of a wealthy and aristocratic family in Heraclea Pontica, he came to Plato's Academy in Athens as a pupil of Speusippus. Like other Academics, ...

Heraclides Ponticus

Heraclides Ponticus   Quick reference

David John Furley

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
500 words

... Ponticus , 4th cent. bc philosopher of the Academy. Born of a wealthy and aristocratic family in Heraclea Pontica , he came to Plato 's Academy in Athens as a pupil of Speusippus . Like other Academics, he wrote a version of Plato's lectures On the Good ; he also studied with Aristotle , probably while Aristotle was still in the Academic school (he does not really belong to Die Schule des Aristoteles , the ‘school of Aristotle’). He was placed in temporary charge of the Academy during Plato's third visit to Sicily (361/0) and after the...

Heraclides (1) Ponticus

Heraclides (1) Ponticus   Reference library

David John

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
644 words

... (1) Ponticus , 4th cent. bc philosopher of the Academy . Born of a wealthy and aristocratic family in Heraclea (3) Pontica , he came to Plato (1) 's Academy in Athens as a pupil of Speusippus . Like other Academics, he wrote a version of Plato's lectures On the Good ; he also studied with Aristotle , probably while Aristotle was still in the Academic school (he does not really belong to Die Schule des Aristoteles , the ‘school of Aristotle’). He was placed in temporary charge of the Academy during Plato's third visit to Sicily ( 361 / 0 )...

Heraclides (5) Ponticus the Younger

Heraclides (5) Ponticus the Younger   Reference library

Cecil Maurice Bowra

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
86 words

... (5) Ponticus the Younger , grammarian, from Heraclea (3) Pontica , pupil of Didymus (1) , later taught at Rome under Claudius and Nero , and wrote three books in Sapphic hendecasyllables (Ath. 649c), which may have influenced Statius ' Silvae . These were erudite and obscure ( Etymologicum Gudianum 297 , 50; Artem. 4. 63) in the style of Lycophron (2) . He also wrote epic poems and Pyrrichae of which nothing is known. Susemihl , Gesch. gr. Litt. Alex. 2. 196. Cecil Maurice...

Heraclides Ponticus

Heraclides Ponticus  

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Overview Page
4th cent. bc philosopher of the Academy. Born of a wealthy and aristocratic family in Heraclea Pontica, he came to Plato's Academy in Athens as a pupil of Speusippus. Like other Academics, he wrote a ...
Heraclides Ponticus the Younger

Heraclides Ponticus the Younger  

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Grammarian, from Heraclea (3) Pontica, pupil of Didymus (1), later taught at Rome under Claudius and Nero, and wrote three books in Sapphic hendecasyllables (Athenaeus 649c), which may have ...
etymologica

etymologica  

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The etymologies in Plato (1)'s Cratylus influenced Hellenistic thinkers, especially Stoics (see Stoicism), and writings ‘On Etymologies’ or the like are attested for Chrysippus, Heraclides (1) ...
Dionysius

Dionysius  

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Of Heraclea (3) on the Pontus (c. 328–248 bc), pupil of Zeno (2) and others, including Heraclides (1) of Pontus. As a Stoic (see Stoicism) he wrote philosophical works, and ...
Asclepiades

Asclepiades  

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(RE 39),of Prusias ad Mare in Bithynia, physician. He spent at least some of his career in Rome, and died sometime in the 1st cent. bc. He is best ...
Antimachus

Antimachus  

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Of Colophon in western Asia Minor, Greek poet and scholar (fl. 400 bc). He may have been taught by Stesimbrotus of Thasos; Plutarch, Lys. 18. 8 says he competed at the Lysandreia festival in Samos in ...
Abaris

Abaris  

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Legendary devotee of Apollo from the far north, a shamanistic missionary and saviour-figure like Aristeas whom Pindar (fr. 270 B. Snell and H. Maehler) associated with the time of Croesus—perhaps ...
geocentricity

geocentricity  

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The theory that the earth lies at the centre of the universe belongs to Greek scientific astronomy. The first man to whom the notion that the earth is spherical and lies at the centre of a spherical ...
Sibyl

Sibyl  

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Originally the Sibyl seems to have been a single prophetic woman, but by the time of Heraclides of Pontus, a number of places claimed to be the birthplace of Sibylla, traditions concerning a number ...
acoustic

acoustic  

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Music
(ă-koo-stik)of or relating to sound or the sense of hearing. a. nerve see cochlear nerve. a. neuroma see (vestibular) schwannoma.
dialogue

dialogue  

1 Vocal work, mainly from medieval times to 17th cent., in which echo, alternation, or contrast suggested spoken dialogue.2 Spoken dialogue is used in some types of opera, e.g. Fr. opéra‐comique, ...
Abaris

Abaris   Reference library

Alan H. Griffiths

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
148 words

...the arrow around the whole world while fasting’ (cf. the mission of Triptolemus , and Demeter 's search for Persephone). The arrow was a token of Apolline authority, and may have been a cure for disease; later traditions have him present it to Pythagoras (1) , and Heraclides (1) Ponticus described him flying on it like a witch's broomstick. A. Lesky , A History of Greek Literature 158 f.; M. L. West , The Orphic Poems (1983), 54. Alan H....

Antimachus

Antimachus   Quick reference

Frederick John Williams

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
366 words

...Minor, Greek poet and scholar (fl. 400 bc ). He may have been taught by Stesimbrotus of Thasos; Plutarch, Lys. 18. 8 says he competed at the Lysandreia festival in Samos in Lysander 's presence (therefore before 395 bc ); his younger friend and admirer Plato sent Heraclides Ponticus (fr. 6 Wehrli) to Colophon to collect his poems. works Small fragments survive: the Thebais was an epic, probably in 24 books, narrating the first expedition against Thebes, and exhibiting a wide knowledge of earlier poetry. Lyde was a narrative elegy in at least two...

geocentricity

geocentricity   Reference library

G. J. Toomer

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
383 words

...heavenly bodies) is composed of an immutable ‘fifth element’ whose natural motion is circular. Alternative hypotheses are occasionally found. In the 5th cent. Philolaus proposed that the earth, like all other heavenly bodies, rotated about a central fire. Later Heraclides (1) Ponticus suggested that the central earth rotates on its axis while the sphere of the fixed stars is stationary. The Epicureans ( see epicurus ), following earlier atomists ( see atomism ), maintained that the natural motion of all matter was ‘down’ (in an absolute sense), and...

Asclepiades

Asclepiades (3)   Reference library

J. T. Valiance

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
287 words

...in antiquity.) The corpuscles were envisaged as moving through ducts (πόροι) distributed throughout the body; when their movement is hindered or altered, morbid effects ensue. The origins of Asclepiades' theory have been traced variously to Epicurus , the Platonist Heraclides (1) Ponticus , the Peripatetic Straton ( 1 ) of Lampsacus, or to a combination of them all. There are strong indications, however, that the theory arose out of a reaction to the physiological system of Erasistratus . Asclepiades was attacked fiercely by Galen for the consequences...

Antimachus

Antimachus (fl. 400 bc)(of Colophon)   Reference library

Frederick John Williams

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
434 words

...poet and scholar ( fl. 400 bc ) . He may have been taught by Stesimbrotus of Thasos; Plutarch, Lys. 18. 8 says he competed at the Lysandreia festival in Samos in Lysander 's presence (therefore before 395 bc ); his younger friend and admirer Plato (1) sent Heraclides (1) Ponticus (fr. 6 Wehrli) to Colophon to collect his poems. Works Small fragments survive: the Thebais was an epic, probably in 24 books, narrating the first expedition against Thebes, and exhibiting a wide knowledge of earlier poetry. Lyde was a narrative elegy in at least...

etymologica

etymologica   Reference library

Jeffrey Stuart Rusten

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
452 words

...The etymologies in Plato ( 1 ) 's Cratylus influenced Hellenistic thinkers, especially Stoics ( see stoicism ), and writings ‘On Etymologies’ or the like are attested for Chrysippus , Heraclides (1) Ponticus , Apollodorus ( 6 ) of Athens, Demetrius (13) Ixion and Philoxenus ( 4 ) . After Hellenistic times, etymological and lexicographic publications were intertwined, and the researches of Hellenistic scholars formed the basis of all later writings (whose source-relationships are accordingly intricate). They were alphabetically arranged for...

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