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Great Rebuilding

Subject: History

In a pioneering aricle, ‘The Rebuilding of Rural England, 1570–1640’, Past and Present, 4 (1953), W. G. Hoskins argued that agricultural prices increased so much during the Elizabethan and ...

Great Rebuilding

Great Rebuilding   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
349 words

... Rebuilding In a pioneering article, ‘The Rebuilding of Rural England, 1570–1640’, Past and Present , 4 (1953) , W. G. Hoskins argued that agricultural prices increased so much during the Elizabethan and early Stuart period that ‘no yeoman with his wits about him could fail to accumulate money savings on a scale hitherto unknown’ and that this led to much rebuilding of houses and a great increase in the standards of domestic comfort. Hoskins used contemporary literary evidence, household accounts, probate inventories , and above all the visual evidence...

Great Rebuilding

Great Rebuilding   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
93 words

... Rebuilding . In a pioneering aricle, ‘The Rebuilding of Rural England, 1570–1640 ’, Past and Present , 4 ( 1953 ), W. G. Hoskins argued that agricultural prices increased so much during the Elizabethan and early Stuart period that ‘no yeoman with his wits about him could fail to accumulate money savings on a scale hitherto unknown’ and that this led to much rebuilding of houses and a great increase in the standards of domestic comfort. The essay remains a useful starting-point in the study of vernacular architecture , but the ideas have now been...

Great Rebuilding

Great Rebuilding  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
In a pioneering aricle, ‘The Rebuilding of Rural England, 1570–1640’, Past and Present, 4 (1953), W. G. Hoskins argued that agricultural prices increased so much during the Elizabethan and early ...
Historic Churches

Historic Churches   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,420 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...are much greater. As the responsibility for building and maintaining the nave, tower, and porch lay with the parishioners, whereas the tithe owners were responsible for the chancel and private individuals or guilds for any chantry chapels that were attached, complete rebuilding in any one period was comparatively rare; piecemeal additions and reconstruction were more usual. Parish churches are therefore usually built in a mixture of styles. Even if they look to be of one build externally, earlier work is often found inside. The stripping of plaster...

Domestic Buildings

Domestic Buildings   Quick reference

Malcolm Airs

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,135 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Houses ( 1951–4 ) by Sir Cyril Fox and Lord Raglan, which established the basis of the archaeological approach to the analysis of standing buildings and first formulated the concept of a Great Rebuilding in the 16th and early 17th centuries. This concept was developed and given a national perspective for England by W. G. Hoskins in a seminal essay, ‘The Rebuilding of Rural England, 1570–1640 ’, first published in the academic journal Past and Present in 1953 and later reprinted in his Provincial England ( 1964 ). Although its central thesis has...

Education

Education   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4,295 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...providing for the election of school boards with power to build and manage schools where the provision by the two voluntary bodies was inadequate. This threat stimulated the Anglican squires of many a village to improve the educational opportunities of the poor by building or rebuilding a National school before the local board could take responsibility. In the largest cities splendid Victorian Gothic board schools were erected to cater for over 1 000 pupils each; in these cities and in many a smaller settlement the board school remains in use to this day....

Towns

Towns   Quick reference

David M. Palliser

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,140 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...provoked a series of important sanitary measures, including the 1848 Public Health Act and the institution of municipal sanitary inspectors in 1866 . In 1875 another Public Health Act offered wide powers to all municipalities, and a Housing Act allowed them to clear and rebuild slums. A new spirit of municipal enterprise—seen strikingly, for instance, in Birmingham under Joseph Chamberlain ( 1836–1914 )—helped to improve urban conditions. Nevertheless, progress was for long very patchy. Urban mortality was steadily reduced, but acute poverty long...

Local Government

Local Government   Quick reference

R. W. Hoyle

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,202 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...like the zealous magistrates of the early 17th century, some chairmen set out to use their authority to reform society, often working under the influence of a revived movement for the reformation of manners. A new interest in prisons developed, often coupled with schemes for rebuilding the county jail along modern lines. Lancashire proceeded further than most counties by securing a statute in 1798 to constitute the magistracy into a Court of Annual General Sessions, in effect a proto‐county council. It was, however, the 1790s which offered the new activist...

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Quick reference

Charles Phythian-Adams

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,654 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...localized participation in national controversies. A second factor was the widening of consumer choice from the 16th and 17th centuries onwards: choice of housing (often in terms of rebuilding), decoration, furnishing, and utensils; choice of clothing or (with the spread of literacy) of reading matter with the ideas which might thus be publicized (see Margaret Spufford , The Great Reclothing of Rural England (1984) and Small Books and Pleasant Histories ( 1981 ). (It has recently been noted, however, that the 18th century trend towards the acquisition of...

13 The Manuscript after the Coming of Print

13 The Manuscript after the Coming of Print   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
3,951 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...exchange of scientific, *alchemical , and astrological MSS in Latin. Alchemy, as an occult science, was particularly hostile to the press. Latin epigrams originally exchanged between the statues of *Pasquino and Marforio in Rome, or celebrating or burlesqueing Louis XIV ’s rebuilding of the Louvre, travelled both singly and in bulk along mazelike channels of erudite correspondence. Religious persecution encouraged organized scribal circulation of oppositional writings—in England, Catholic and Puritan, in France, Huguenot and Jansenist. In Spain and Italy,...

Edward Woodroffe

Edward Woodroffe  

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Overview Page
(c. 1622–75).English architect and surveyor. After the Great Fire of London (1666) he was appointed (with Hooke and Wren) as one of the three Surveyors to rebuild the City churches. He assisted Wren ...
Jan Zachwatowicz

Jan Zachwatowicz  

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Overview Page
(1900–83).Polish architect and architectural historian, a graduate of the School of Architecture, Warsaw (1930). In 1939 he became Director of the Department of Architecture, teaching students ...
building stones

building stones  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
It is probably true to say that all the rocks that are accessible to humans have been used for constructional purposes at one time or another. In general, the stones ...
Nicholas Barbon

Nicholas Barbon  

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Overview Page
(c. 1638–98).Born in London, he not only became one of the most important developers there after the Great Fire (1666), but instituted fire insurance. He built houses at Red Lion Fields, near Gray's ...
Herod the Great

Herod the Great  

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(c.73–4bc), son of the Idumaean Antipater, was through him made governor of Galilee in 47 bc and then, with his brother, designated tetrarch by Mark Antony. Herod escaped the Parthian invasion of 40, ...
grey

grey  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Grey area an area of law or morality which does not fall into any predefined category and which is a matter of uncertainty. In the 1960s, grey areas in British planning parlance referred to places ...
brickstamps Roman

brickstamps Roman  

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Overview Page
Stamped bricks began to be used in Rome during the 1st cent. bc. Except for the brickstamps of military units throughout the Roman empire, these inscriptions became historically and archaeologically ...
Tudor architecture

Tudor architecture  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The Tudor monarchy (1485–1603) is not associated with architecture in the same way as Georgian or Queen Anne, though there is notable work at the beginning (see perpendicular) and the end (see ...
urban housing

urban housing  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The earliest surviving town houses are the 12th‐century stone buildings, notably two on Steep Hill, Lincoln, which had living accommodation on the first floor, with space at street level for a shop, ...
Dorset

Dorset  

Is one of the oldest and most beautiful shires. The county is largely the basin of the river Frome. For centuries it was the quietest of rural counties, with small market towns like Shaftesbury, ...

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