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Grace George

(1879–1961), actress. The fair‐haired, blue‐eyed beauty was born in New York and educated at a convent, later studying at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts before making her ...

George, Grace

George, Grace (1879–1961)   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
93 words

..., Grace ( 1879–1961 ), American actress, wife of the manager William A. Brady . She played the lead in many of her husband's productions, and was particularly admired as Lady Teazle in Sheridan 's The School for Scandal ( 1909 ), Barbara Undershaft in the first American production of Shaw 's Major Barbara ( 1915 ), and the title-role in St John Ervine 's The First Mrs Fraser ( 1929 ). Her only appearance in London was in 1907 as Cyprienne in Sardou 's Divorçons , which many considered her finest part. She was last seen with Katharine Cornell ...

George, Grace

George, Grace (1879–1961)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Theatre (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
231 words

..., Grace ( 1879–1961 ), actress . The fair‐haired, blue‐eyed beauty was born in New York and educated at a convent, later studying at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts before making her debut as a schoolgirl in The New Boy ( 1894 ). Her first important role was the innkeeper's daughter Juliette in The Turtle ( 1898 ). George quickly mastered a style that her husband, producer William A. Brady , would later describe as “the fast‐building, vivacious, chin up and tongue‐sparkling sort of thing, with wit and tears mingled.” She demonstrated these...

Grace George

Grace George  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1879–1961), actress.The fair‐haired, blue‐eyed beauty was born in New York and educated at a convent, later studying at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts before making her debut as ...
Superstitions

Superstitions   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
2,047 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...have countered it in print. But here's one: “This proscription [‘Never begin a sentence with because ’] appears in no handbook of usage I know of, but the belief seems to have a popular currency among many students.” Joseph M. Williams , Style: Ten Lessons in Clarity and Grace 168 ( 1981 ). It appears to result from concern about fragments—e.g.: “Then the group broke for lunch. Because we were hungry.” Of course, the second “sentence” is merely a fragment, not a complete sentence. ( See incomplete sentences (a) .) But problems of that kind simply...

Scottish Local and Family History

Scottish Local and Family History   Quick reference

David moody

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,622 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...have received attention in Scotland are public versus private policy, housing conditions, and suburban growth. The most comprehensive survey is that of Ian H. Adams , The Making of Urban Scotland ( 1978 ); other stimulating works include George Gordon and Brian Dicks (eds), Scottish Urban History ( 1983 ), George Gordon , Perspectives of the Scottish City ( 1985 ), and Sarah Govan (ed.), Medieval or Later Rural Settlement in Scotland: 10 Years On ( 2003 ). Sources are outlined in David Moody , Scottish Towns ( 1992 ). Strong Scottish...

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Quick reference

Charles Phythian-Adams

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,654 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...miracles associated with St William of Norwich are recorded up to 50 miles from that city. Much of medieval north‐east England looked to the protection of St Cuthbert, a relic of whom, stitched into ‘his’ banner, was brought out to rally the rebels on the Pilgrimage of Grace. In Victoria's reign, by contrast, detailed work on the contrasted types of ‘ mummers '’ plays reveals heavily regionalized distributions of form and seasonal timing (see E. C. Cawte , Alex Helm , and N. Peacock , English Ritual Drama (1967) ). Different types of supernatural...

Timon of Athens

Timon of Athens   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,245 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...at their refusal that they banish him: he vows to rally his troops and attack Athens in revenge. 3.7 Timon’s friends, convinced his apparent bankruptcy must have been a test of their loyalty, gather eagerly for the feast. Covered dishes are brought in: Timon recites a satirical grace before their lids are lifted, revealing only stones in lukewarm water. He rants at his guests and beats them, vowing eternal misanthropy. 4.1 Outside Athens Timon curses the city, tearing off his clothes to live in the woods as a beast. 4.2 Flavius bids a poignant farewell to his...

All’s Well That Ends Well

All’s Well That Ends Well   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,814 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...upstart) was less objectionable. George Bernard Shaw , for example, who praised the play as a prefiguration of Ibsen, sided with Helen, Frank Harris with Bertram. Only since the 1930s have what once seemed the play’s moral failures or equivocations been revalued as successful dramatizations of an ethically complex world, its interest in expiation, pilgrimage, and forgiveness (particularly its plays on the word ‘grace’) often linked with the (similarly revalued) late romances. Enthusiastic supporters have included George Wilson Knight and E. M. W....

George Friel

George Friel  

(1910–75)Scottish novelist, born in Glasgow and educated at the University of Glasgow. His novels include The Boy who Wanted Peace (1964), Grace and Miss Partridge (1969), and the widely ...
Mavourneen

Mavourneen  

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Overview Page
(1891),a play by George H. Jessop and Horace Townsend. [14th Street Theatre, 102 perf.] Terence Dwyer (W. J. Scanlan) rescues his beloved Kate (Grace Thorne) from abductors, only to ...
Philanderer

Philanderer  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1905), a play by George Bernard Shaw, written in 1893, and which he described as being about ‘the fashionable cult of Ibsenism and “New Womanism”’. The action concerns the triangular relation ...
Clothes

Clothes  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1906),a play by Avery Hopwood and Channing Pollock. [Manhattan Theatre, 113 perf.] Olivia Sherwood (Grace George) likes more expensive clothes than she can afford, so she sets out to ...
A Woman's Way

A Woman's Way  

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Overview Page
(1909),a play by Thompson Buchanan. [Hackett Theatre, 112 perf.] When Howard Stanton (Frank Worthing) confesses to his wife, Marion (Grace George), that he is in love with the widowed ...
Contemporary Group

Contemporary Group  

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Overview Page
The name of two associations of Australian artists—one in Sydney, the other in Melbourne—founded to encourage an appreciation of modern art in their country; they were separate but existed at the ...
Lawrence Oates

Lawrence Oates  

(1880–1912).Having entered the army in 1898, Oates saw service in the South African War. His interest in sailing, hunting, and kindred pursuits led him to apply for a post on Scott's 1910 expedition ...
Ultra Naté

Ultra Naté  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Music
B. 2 November 1968, Havre de Grace, Maryland, USA. Dance pop diva, who first rose to fame in 1989 via the club hit, ‘It’s Over Now’. Ultra Naté (which is ...
Grace Kelly

Grace Kelly  

(1928–1982)US film actress, whose short career came to an end when she married Prince Rainier III (1923– ) of Monaco in 1956.Born into a wealthy family in Philadelphia, daughter of self-made ...
Playhouse Theatre

Playhouse Theatre  

Reference type:
Overview Page
New York, on West 48th Street, between Broadway and the Avenue of the Americas. Built by William A. Brady, this opened in 1911, and had its first success with Broadhurst's ...
Georges Carpentier

Georges Carpentier  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1894–1975)A French professional boxer who began fighting professionally at the age of 14, and fought at all eight weights throughout his career. He held the world light heavyweight title, and ...
Within the Law

Within the Law  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1912),a play by Bayard Veiller. [Eltinge Theatre, 541 perf.] Falsely accused of theft by her employer Edward Gilder (Dodson Mitchell) and sentenced to three years in prison, Mary Turner ...

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