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Goídel Glas

Subject: Religion

[cf. W Gwyddel, Irishman]. Eponymous founder of the Goidelic or Gaelic languages, according to the pseudo-history Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions]. Son of a Pharaoh's daughter, ...

Goídel Glas

Goídel Glas   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

... Glas , Goidel , Gaodhal , Gaidel , Gaedheal , Gael , Gadelus , Gathelus [cf. W Gwyddel , Irishman]. Eponymous founder of the Goidelic or Gaelic languages, according to the pseudo-history Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions]. Son of a Pharaoh's daughter, Scota (2) , and Niúl , a forebear of the Milesians , Goídel barely survives infancy. The biblical Moses saves him when he was bitten by a snake; the resultant green mark gives Goídel his epithet glas [green]. Moses cures him with a touch of his rod and then prophesies that he and his...

Goídel Glas

Goídel Glas  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[cf. W Gwyddel, Irishman].Eponymous founder of the Goidelic or Gaelic languages, according to the pseudo-history Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions]. Son of a Pharaoh's daughter, Scota (2), and Niúl, a ...
Fénius Farsaid

Fénius Farsaid  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[Ir., Fénius the Pharisee].Sometimes: Fénius the Ancient. Fabled linguist and ancestor of the Milesians and thus of the Irish people. According to the Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions], Fénius was a ...
Niúl

Niúl  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Son of Fénius Farsaid, inventor of the Irish language, in the pseudo-history Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions]. Husband of Scota (2), he fathers Goídel Glas, also important to the early history of the ...
Q-Celts

Q-Celts  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The division of the Celtic languages into Q- and P-families depends on whether they retained the Indo-European qu- or substituted a p-. The substitution of p- for qu- probably took place in the first ...
Goedal Glas

Goedal Glas   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...Glas . Corrupt spelling of Goídel Glas...

Gaodhal Glas

Gaodhal Glas   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...Glas . Variant spelling of Goídel Glas...

Gadelus

Gadelus   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

.... Latinized form of Goídel Glas...

Gathelus

Gathelus   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

.... Variant form of Goídel Glas...

Gáedel

Gáedel   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

..., Gaedhal . . Variant forms of Goídel Glas...

Niúl

Niúl   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

.... Son of Fénius Farsaid , inventor of the Irish language, in the pseudo-history Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions]. Husband of Scota (2) , he fathers Goídel Glas , also important to the early history of the Irish language. According to the inventive text, Niúl is a renowned schoolmaster who gives his name to the Nile...

Gael

Gael   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...name for the Gaelic people is somehow derived from Goídel Glas , the inventor of the Irish language in the medieval pseudo-history Lebor Gabála [Book of Invasions]. OIr. Goídel is the word both for the supposed eponymous ancestor of the Irish language and for an Irishman or Scottish Highlander. Gael is indeed a modern form, in both Irish and English contexts, for Goídel, and Gael is the reformed ModIr. word for Irishman; cf. unreformed, Gaedheal. Learned commentators argue, however, that the OIr. Goídel predates the composition of the Lebor Gabála and...

Q-Celts

Q-Celts   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...roots, e.g. Ir. ceann , head and W pen , head. The modern Q-Celtic languages are Irish, Scottish Gaelic, and Manx; these are also called Goidelic. The distinctions are not always absolute; Irish Q-Celtic speakers settled in Dyfed , a Welsh-speaking or P-Celtic region. See GOÍDEL GLAS...

Fénius Farsaid

Fénius Farsaid   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

... [Book of Invasions], Fénius was a king of the Scythians , contemporary with Moses; present at the Tower of Babel during the biblical separation of languages, he alone retained them all. His son Niúl went to Egypt and married the Pharaoh's Scota (2) , producing the son Goídel Glas , who fashioned the Irish language out of the seventy-two tongues then in existence, following Fénius' instructions. Fénius appears to be created from Féni , a name for Ireland's earliest...

Scota

Scota   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...a large boulder (35 feet high), Leath Scoithin , bears an ogham inscription put in place by modern enthusiasts; the site, better known as Foley's Glen, lies by the stream Finglas near Tralee. 2 [L, Irishwoman] . Wife of Niúl , the son of Fénius Farsaid , and mother of Goídel Glas . Like the younger and better-known Scota (1) , with whom she is often confused, Scota (2) is reputedly the daughter of an Egyptian...

Gael

Gael   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
170 words

... (adj. Gaelic ), the name of the population of Ireland, particularly those who adhere(d) to the Irish language and native culture. The word appears originally as Goídel and is a loanword from Welsh Gwyddel, ‘Irishman’, which itself has a pejorative meaning (Welsh gwydd , ‘wild, savage’). Irish tradition derived the name from Gaedheal Glas, a grandson of Noah who fashioned the Irish ( Gaedhilg , ‘Gaelic’) language from the best elements of the 72 languages spoken at the time of the tower of Babel. It appears to have been employed as an ethnic term by the...

Milesians

Milesians   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...during the biblical separation of the languages. His son Niúl married a pharaoh's daughter, Scota [L, Irishwoman] (2), producing Goídel Glas , who fashioned the Irish language, following Fénius' instructions. The Milesians were so intimate with the captive Israelites that none other than Moses had saved the life of the infant Goídel with a touch of his rod. The child had been bitten by a snake, and Moses pledged that Goídel and his descendants would live in a land without serpents. In subsequent generations the Milesians met with persecution in Egypt and...

Lebor Gabála Érenn

Lebor Gabála Érenn   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...later authorities opted for 4004 bc . The Scoti (i.e. Goidels, Irish) are assumed to have originated in Scythia but to have taken their name from Scota (1) or Scotia, the daughter of a Pharaoh. While in Egypt the Scoti know Moses and are invited to join the Exodus, a probable source of the longstanding canard that the Irish are a lost tribe of Israel. Fénius Farsaid is described as being present at the separation of languages at Babel and leaving instructions for his grandson, Goídel Glas , to forge the Irish languages out of the seventy-two...

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