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Glasgow Boys

A loose association of Scottish artists active from about 1880 to the turn of the century; there was no formal membership or programme, but the artists involved were linked by a desire to ...

Glasgow Boys

Glasgow Boys   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
218 words

... Boys The nickname given by critics to a loosely associated group of predominantly Glasgow-based artists on the occasion of their work being shown at the Grosvenor Gallery, London in 1890 . Their art represented a reaction against the Edinburgh establishment's (in particular the Royal Scottish Academy's) control of artistic matters in Scotland at that time. It was also an affirmation of Glasgow's industrially-based rise to a commercial prominence whereby it could justly claim to be the second city of the British Empire after London. The sources for the...

Glasgow Boys

Glasgow Boys   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Modern and Contemporary Art (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
192 words

... Boys A loose association of Scottish artists active from about 1880 to the turn of the century; there was no formal membership or programme, but the artists involved were linked by a desire to move away from the conservative and parochial values they thought were represented by the Royal Scottish Academy in Edinburgh. Several of them had worked in France and were proponents of open-air painting. There is little obvious association with Glasgow in their work. The Scottish Arts Review , founded in 1888 , acted as their mouthpiece. William York...

Glasgow Boys

Glasgow Boys  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A loose association of Scottish artists active from about 1880 to the turn of the century; there was no formal membership or programme, but the artists involved were linked by a desire to move away ...
Education

Education   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4,282 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... Alumni Oxonienses, 1715–1886 (4 vols, 1888) , and J. and J. A. Venn , Alumni Cantabrigienses (10 vols in 2 pts (to 1751 , 1752–1900 ), 1922–54 ), list the students of those periods. The next four British universities were all founded in Scotland: at St Andrews ( 1410 ), Glasgow ( 1451 ), Aberdeen ( 1494 ), and Edinburgh ( 1582 ); these were followed by Trinity College Dublin ( 1591 ). From its foundation in 1571 Jesus College, Oxford, was the main institution of higher education for Welsh students. The names of the earliest alumni of the Scottish...

Education

Education   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,267 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...were also some small-town, or ‘burgh’, schools which offered more advanced education, along with city grammar schools which specialized in Latin and Greek and prepared pupils for entry to the universities. In Scotland, universities or university colleges existed at St Andrews, Glasgow, Aberdeen, and Edinburgh, the earliest of them dating back to the fifteenth century. Collectively, these institutions almost trebled their enrolments over the course of the eighteenth century, though it has been calculated that only about one in a thousand Scots gained admission...

Class

Class   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,846 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of England and Chartism totally oppose each other’. Such confrontations served only to accelerate Chartist attempts to set up their own places of worship, especially in Scotland, where Chartist churches became widespread, some even rotating the ministry among all members. The Glasgow Chartists took religious authority into their own hands and operated a primitive Christian democracy. Chartist public rhetoric was mainly constitutionalist and gave paramount authority to ‘the People’. Thus at New Year festivities in Barnsley in 1839 , Chartists raised the first...

Boys' Brigade

Boys' Brigade  

Founded by William Alexander Smith in Glasgow in 1883. Smith started the brigade as a means of controlling the boys who attended his Scottish free church Sunday school. He sought to use military ...
Edward Atkinson Hornel

Edward Atkinson Hornel  

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Overview Page
(1864–1933)Scottish painter, born in Bacchus Marsh, Victoria, Australia. Shortly after he was born his parents left for Kirkcudbright in Scotland, where he remained for most of his life. He was ...
Glasgow School

Glasgow School  

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Overview Page
A group of artists and architects including Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Margaret Macdonald who worked in Glasgow from the 1890s and were influenced by Art Nouveau and the Arts and Crafts Movement.
Ken Currie

Ken Currie  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1960– )Scottish painter, the most overtly political of the Glasgow School which emerged in the 1980s. Born in North Shields to Scottish parents, he studied at Glasgow School of Art between 1978 and ...
Donald James Robertson

Donald James Robertson  

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Overview Page
(1926–70)Robertson was born in Glasgow on 17 May 1926, and died there on 22 August 1970. He attended Hutcheson’s Boys Grammar School, where he was dux in English and ...
Sir John Lavery

Sir John Lavery  

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(1856–1941)British painter, mainly of portraits. He was born in Belfast and studied in Glasgow, in London, and then in the early 1880s in Paris (at the Académie Julian and elsewhere). Between 1885 ...
Alexander Macbeath

Alexander Macbeath  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
(1888–1964)Alexander Macbeath was born on the Applecross peninsula, Wester Ross on 16 October 1888 and died in Aberfeldy on 15 December 1964. He attended Hutchesons' Boys Grammar School, Glasgow ...
Herbert Hayens

Herbert Hayens  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(b. 1861) married Jeanie Douglas——(d. 1933).Chief editor at Collins & Co., the publishers, he lived in Glasgow, edited anthologies, and was a prolific author of textbooks and boys' books ...
Scottish Colourists

Scottish Colourists  

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Overview Page
A term first used in 1948 to describe the work of four Scottish painters, F. C. B. Cadell, Leslie Hunter, S. J. People, and J. D. Fergusson, who spent time in France in the early 20th century and ...
New English Art Club

New English Art Club  

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Overview Page
(NEAC)Artists' society founded in London in 1886 in reaction against the conservative and complacent attitudes of the Royal Academy. The founders—largely artists who had worked in France and had been ...
Boys' Brigade

Boys' Brigade   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
71 words

...' Brigade Founded by William Alexander Smith in Glasgow in 1883 . Smith started the brigade as a means of controlling the boys who attended his Scottish free church Sunday school. He sought to use military drill and discipline for the religious and moral improvement of the boys. The crest of the brigade was an anchor and its motto ‘Sure and Stedfast’. The uniform consisted of a ‘pill‐box’ cap, belt, and...

Glasgow School

Glasgow School   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artists (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
249 words

...Nouveau . Its most important member was the architect and designer Charles Rennie Mackintosh ( 1868–1928 ). More recently, the term ‘Glasgow School’ (or ‘new Glasgow Boys’ or facetiously ‘Glasgow pups’) has been applied to a group of figurative painters working in the city from the 1980s. They include Ken Currie ( b 1960 ), Peter Howson ( b 1958 ), and Adrian Wiszniewski ( b 1958 ), all of whom were students at Glasgow School of Art at much the same...

Glasgow School

Glasgow School   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Modern and Contemporary Art (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
224 words

... School A term that has been applied to several groups of artists whose activities have centred on Glasgow. The largest of these groups, which was at its peak in the last years of the 19th century, consisted mainly of painters who challenged the conservatism of the Royal Scottish Academy; they preferred to be known as the Glasgow Boys . A slightly later group, of which Charles Rennie Mackintosh was the leading member, created a distinctive Scottish version of Art Nouveau ; the four principal members of this group are also known as the Glasgow Four ....

Boys’ Brigade

Boys’ Brigade   Reference library

Richard A. Smith

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
148 words

...’ Brigade . Founded by William Alexander Smith in Glasgow in 1883 . Smith started the brigade as a means of controlling the boys who attended his Scottish free church Sunday school. He sought to use military drill and discipline for the religious and moral improvement of the boys. The first meeting was held on 4 October 1883 in the Mission Hall, North Woodside Road, Glasgow. The crest of the brigade was an anchor and its motto ‘Sure and Stedfast’. The uniform consisted of a ‘pill-box’ cap, belt, and haversack. During the 1890s the organization spread...

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