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George Maniakes

General and usurper; died Ostrovo near Thessalonike between Apr. and early June 1043 (Shepard, “Russians Attack” 174, n.4). Of low birth, Maniakes (Μανιάκης) impressed even his ...

Maniakes, George

Maniakes, George   Reference library

Charles M. Brand and Anthony Cutler

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
326 words

...Constantinople. Maniakes' career is depicted at length in the Madrid Skylitzes MS ( Grabar -Manoussacas, Skylitzès , nos. 500f, 519–21, 545–47). Descendants of his former troops, called Maniakatai, are attested in the late 11th C. (An. Komn . 2:117.3); a protospatharios George Maniakes (the same or a grandson?) held land in central Greece ( Svoronos , Cadastre 69). K. Konstantopoulos ( EEBS 9 [ 1932 ] 123–28) denies that the seal published by G. Schlumberger ( L'epopée byzantine [Paris 1905 ] 3:457) belonged to Maniakes. Falkenhausen , ...

Maniakes, George

Maniakes, George (1043)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

..., George (d. 1043 ), an ambitious Byzantine military commander, possibly of Turkic stock. Maniakes’s military and organizational talents earned him key border commands in Byzantium’s expansionist heyday. By 1030 he was military governor of Telouch (northern Syria). His success in defending it from Arab raiders led to his command of towns in the Euphrates Valley farther east. Maniakes exploited this vantage point to annex Edessa (modern-day Urfa). In the mid-1030s he was appointed governor of the former Kingdom of Vaspurakan in southeastern Armenia....

George Maniakes

George Maniakes  

General and usurper; died Ostrovo near Thessalonike between Apr. and early June 1043 (Shepard, “Russians Attack” 174, n.4).Of low birth, Maniakes (Μανιάκης) impressed even his opponents by his great ...
Hervé Frankopoulos

Hervé Frankopoulos  

(῾Ερβέβιος ὁ Φραγγόπωλος), mid-11th-C. commander of Norman mercenaries in Byz. service.He may have been the founder of the Byz. family of Phrangopoulos. Hervé fought in Sicily under George Maniakes ...
Gaufredus Malaterra

Gaufredus Malaterra  

Benedictine monk who accompanied other Normans to southern Italy and who evidently belonged to the entourage of Count Roger I of Sicily; died before 1101.At Count Roger I's request ...
Martyropolis

Martyropolis  

(Μαρτυρόπολις, Ar. Mayyāfāriqīn, mod. Silvan in Turkey), city northeast of Amida. Its identification with Tigranocerta, ancient capital of Armenia, is disputed. According to a late legend (J.M. Fiey, ...
Jaroslav

Jaroslav  

(῾Ιεροσθλάβος), prince of Kiev; son of Vladimir I of Kiev; baptismal name George; born 978, died Kiev 20 Feb. 1054.Victorious in his war for the succession, Jaroslav became the ...
Leo Paraspondylos

Leo Paraspondylos  

High-ranking official; died after 1057.The name Paraspondylos (Παρασπόνδυλος, or, in Skyl. 479.16, Strabospondylos, “a crook”) is probably a sobriquet. Seemingly, Leo sprang from the family of the ...
Messina

Messina  

(Μεσήνη), from antiquity a port city at the northeastern tip of Sicily controlling the Straits of Messina, the principal crossing from the island to southern Italy. During the Gothic war ...
Michael IV Paphlagon

Michael IV Paphlagon  

Emperor (1034–41); died Constantinople 10 Dec. 1041.Member of a family of money-changers of Paphlagonian origin, he was introduced to the Empress Zoe by his brother, John the Orphanotrophos. Michael ...
Michael V Kalaphates

Michael V Kalaphates  

(Καλαφάτης, i.e., “the Caulker”), emperor (1041–42). Son of Stephen, a caulker (whence Michael's nickname), and the sister of Michael IV, he was adopted by Zoe and named caesar and heir ...
William of Apulia

William of Apulia  

Historian of the reign of Robert Guiscard; fl. late 11th C. Probably a Norman in southern Italy, William wrote ca.1095–99 the Gesta Roberti Wiscardi, a Latin historical epic dedicated to ...
Constantine IX Monomachos

Constantine IX Monomachos  

(Μονομάχος), emperor (1042–1055); born ca.1000, died Constantinople 7/8 Jan. (Kleinchroniken 1:159, 167) or 11 Jan. (Grumel, Chronologie 358; Ostrogorsky, History 337) 1055.From a distinguished ...
Romanos III Argyros

Romanos III Argyros  

Or Argyropoulos, emperor (1028–34); born ca.968, died Constantinople 11/12 Apr. 1034.Coming from a noble family, Romanos was oikonomos of Hagia Sophia, Constantinople, then Eparch of the city. ...
Telouch

Telouch  

(Τελούχ), Byz. city and theme, later a strategis, on the borders of Anatolia and Syria, near Germanikeia. It derived its name from late antique Doliche (now Dülük in Turkey), a ...
Argyros

Argyros  

Son of Melo of Bari; magistros, vestes, and doux of Italy, Calabria, Sicily, and Paphlagonia (1051–58); born ca.1000, died after 1058, possibly Bari 1068. During Melo's first revolt, Argyros and ...
Catania

Catania  

(Κατάνη), city on the east coast of Sicily; together with the rest of the island, Catania belonged to the Ostrogothic state from 491. While Catania was under the Ostrogoths, royal ...
Christopher of Mytilene

Christopher of Mytilene  

Poet, highranking imperial official; born Constantinople ca.1000, died after 1050 or perhaps after 1068. Christopher had the titles of patrikios and anthypatos, and served as imperial secretary ...
Military Commanders

Military Commanders  

In theory, the emperor was supreme commander of the army, but only a few (such as Constantine V, Nikephoros II Phokas, Basil II, or the Komnenoi) personally led armies in ...
Katakalon Kekaumenos

Katakalon Kekaumenos  

(d. after c. 1060), senior Byzantine military commander from Armenian army family; died a monk. By 1040 Katakalon was defending the key fortress of Messina against Muslim attack: his stratagem ...

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