Update
The Oxford Biblical Studies Online and Oxford Islamic Studies Online have retired. Content you previously purchased on Oxford Biblical Studies Online or Oxford Islamic Studies Online has now moved to Oxford Reference, Oxford Handbooks Online, Oxford Scholarship Online, or What Everyone Needs to Know®. For information on how to continue to view articles visit the subscriber services page.
Dismiss

You are looking at 1-20 of 216 entries  for:

  • All: Generative Morphology x
clear all

View:

Overview

Generative Morphology

Subject: Linguistics

Within the theoretical framework of early generative grammar, morphology was not considered an autonomous component of the grammar; it was split between morphophonology, as part of ...

Generative Morphology

Generative Morphology   Reference library

International Encyclopedia of Linguistics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
868 words

... Morphology . Within the theoretical framework of early generative grammar, morphology was not considered an autonomous component of the grammar; it was split between morphophonology , as part of phonology, and morphosyntax , as part of syntax. Thus Chomsky 1957 used “morphophonemic” rules to describe the formation of the past tense of verbs, and Lees 1960 proposed that compounds were formed by transformational rules. Morphology was first accorded a specific role in generative grammar by Chomsky 1970 ; within this framework, Halle 1973 proposed...

Classical Generative Morphology

Classical Generative Morphology   Reference library

Pius ten Hacken

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Morphology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Linguistics, Language reference
Length:
7,934 words
Illustration(s):
24

...generative morphology. 1. Delimitation of the Topic The scope of generative morphology can be seen as the intersection of morphology and generative linguistics . The term morphology is used in linguistics for the rules that determine the shape of words. This can be elaborated into rules for forming words or generalizations about the structure of words. In either perspective, what is morphology depends on the definition of word . The question of how to define word is a classical one in linguistics. The characterization of a word by Bloomfield...

Generative Morphology

Generative Morphology  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
Within the theoretical framework of early generative grammar, morphology was not considered an autonomous component of the grammar; it was split between morphophonology, as part of phonology, and ...
Percolation

Percolation  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
Percolation is a theoretical mechanism used in the framework of generative morphology to effect the distribution of morphological characteristics (such as tense, number, and person) of constituent ...
grammar

grammar  

The whole system and structure of a language or of languages in general, usually taken as consisting of syntax and morphology (including inflections) and sometimes also phonology and semantics; ...
Lexical Morphology

Lexical Morphology   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
82 words

...Morphology One view of morphology developed within a broadly generative framework. The basic unit is the morpheme; words have a constituency structure of which morphemes are the minimal elements; and, in the extreme version, the entire construction of words, including those aspects that are traditionally called inflectional, belongs to an account of the lexicon . The belief that this version is correct is the Strong (or Strict) Lexicalist Hypothesis. See also inferential-realizational , for ‘lexical’ in general application to inflectional morphology...

component

component   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
45 words

...1. A part of grammar, as distinguished especially in theories of generative grammar from the 1960s onwards: thus a syntactic component and a phonological component, a morphological component if it is seen as separate from these, and so on. 2. See componential analysis...

‘Strong Lexicalist Hypothesis’

‘Strong Lexicalist Hypothesis’   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
53 words

...Lexicalist Hypothesis’ The view that, firstly, there is no distinction in principle between inflectional and derivational morphology and, secondly, they both belong, in a generative grammar, to the lexicon and not to syntax. Distinguished from the ‘Weak Lexicalist Hypothesis’, by which derivation belongs to the lexicon but inflection does...

grammar

grammar n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n . 1. The branch of linguistics concerned with sentence structure, especially syntax and morphology ( 2 ) . 2. The system of implicit rules governing a speaker's use of a language, especially semantics and phonology . See also case grammar , context-dependent grammar , context-free grammar , finite-state grammar , generative grammar , phrase-structure grammar , pivot grammar , transformational grammar , universal grammar . [From Greek grammatikos concerning...

Lexical Phonology

Lexical Phonology   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
182 words

...Phonology Model of morphology and phonology developed in the 1980s in a partial reaction to classical Generative Phonology . The derivation of words is separate from, and in the organization of a generative grammar forms a component operating ahead of, their insertion into syntactic constructions: compare, in that respect, the general concept of Lexical Morphology . Within this component, phonological processes are sensitive to processes of affixation: e.g. in words like photógraphy (← phótograph ), the placing of the accent and the associated...

grammar

grammar   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
103 words

...of words ( morphology ) and how words combine into phrases, clauses and sentences ( syntax ). It can also include semantics . Prescriptive grammar is a value-based subject that establishes conventions of ‘correct’ usage. Descriptive grammar describes actual usage patterns. In 1957 Noam Chomsky developed the concept of generative grammar, which aims to provide a formal description of the finite set of linguistic rules that generate the infinite number of grammatical sentences in a language. Transformational grammar is a form of generative grammar...

Pāṇini

Pāṇini   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
116 words

...of linguistics in India. They include a detailed account of morphology and morphophonology , in which the basic structure of the word is clearly set out, and which was to become a model, in the early 19th century, for the comparative analysis of Indo-European by Western scholars. In the 20th century Pāṇini’s descriptive devices, which included the use of ordered rules and zero elements , had a direct influence on Bloomfield and, through him, on generative grammars and Generative Phonology especially...

Optimality Theory

Optimality Theory   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of English Grammar (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...of language developed by A. Prince, P. Smolensky, and associates in the 1990s in which optimal phonological, morphological, and syntactic representations are generated through a list of ordered constraints. 2004 A. PRINCE and P. SMOLENSKY The basic idea we will explore is that Universal Grammar (UG) consists largely of a set of constraints on representational well-formedness, out of which individual grammars are constructed. See also Generative Grammar ( 2 )...

derive

derive (Morphology)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of English Grammar (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... Morphology . 1. Of a word etc.: descend from an earlier word in the same or another language. Thus the noun denim is derived from 17th-century serge denim , from French serge de Nîmes (‘serge made in the town of Nîmes’); atonement derives from the prepositional phrase at one + the suffix - ment . 2. Form a lexeme from another lexeme by a process of derivation ( 1 ) . 3. (In Generative Grammar ( 2 ) . ) obtain one structure from another by applying certain rules , transformations , etc.; see derivation ( 2 )...

overgeneration

overgeneration   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
102 words

...The generation by one part of a generative grammar of forms that are then excluded either by another part or by more general principles. Seen at its simplest in accounts of derivational morphology and compounding . E.g. there is a process by which compounds can be formed from an adjective and a noun: black + leg → blackleg . If this applies to any combination it will overgenerate: e.g. white + wrist → whitewrist . But let it do so: forms like whitewrist are then implicitly excluded by a lexicon which will have entries only for the...

readjustment rule

readjustment rule   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
87 words

...various sorts introduced into the theory of generative grammar by Chomsky and Halle, SPE . In the account then standard, surface structures were derived by transformations and were then assigned a phonetic interpretation by rules of phonology. But such structures were not in all respects interpretable directly: e.g. some boundaries between syntactic units did not correspond to those of phonological units. Therefore rules were required to ‘readjust’ them. Hence of similar rules posited in Distributed Morphology...

Generative Phonology

Generative Phonology   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
165 words

... Phonology The account of alternations in phonology and morphology developed in the 1950s and 1960s, by Morris Halle and his followers, as a component of a generative grammar . At a certain level of representation, the surface structure of a sentence was a configuration of ‘formatives’ or morphemes , each entered from the lexicon as a single feature matrix . Such representations were the input to, or were ‘interpreted by’, an ordered set of phonological rules, each conceived as an operation which would change, add, delete, or rearrange features...

Morpheme

Morpheme   Reference library

International Encyclopedia of Linguistics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
372 words

...i.e., it must have the ‘plural’ morpheme. But where is its allomorph? No satisfying answer was found; and by the 1960s it was clear that the model in its strict form distorted the morphology of many languages. But from the 1970s onward, a unit like the morpheme remained central to many generative accounts of morphology (see Spencer 1991 for a survey). See also Morphology . Bibliography Bloomfield, Leonard . 1933. Language . New York: Holt. Haas, William . 1954. On defining linguistic units . Transactions of the Philological Society 1954.54–84....

grammar

grammar   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Media and Communication (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
168 words

...organization of language : centrally, the forms and combinations of wordings (morphology and syntax ) but sometimes also including the patterning of sounds ( phonology ). The most basic grammatical distinction is also the logical one—between the subject of discourse and what is said about it (the predicate) or between nouns and verbs; see also proposition . 2. Syntax (the structure or clauses and sentences) and morphology (word structure). 3. In generative grammar, the linguistic knowledge internalized by a native speaker. 4. Even more...

Hale, Kenneth Lock

Hale, Kenneth Lock (1934–2001)   Reference library

International Encyclopedia of Linguistics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
123 words

...theory with typological data from a range of languages. He was very active as an advocate of the development and preservation of indigenous languages. See also Australian Languages ; Fieldwork ; History of Linguistics , article on Generative Grammar . Anna Morpurgo...

View: