Update

View:

Overview

Freedmen's Bureau

To assist the adjustment of newly freed slaves in the post–Civil War South, Congress in March 1865 established the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands under the leadership of ...

Freedmen's Bureau.

Freedmen's Bureau.   Reference library

Terry L. Seip

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
290 words

...by 1869 , the Freedmen's Bureau ceased operations in June 1872 . Overall the Bureau provided invaluable relief and educational aid for the 3.9 million former slaves, but its initial promise was limited by inadequate funding and manpower, excessively paternalistic leadership, and deeply embedded racial antagonisms. See also African Americans ; Reconstruction ; Sharecropping and Tenantry . George R. Bentley , A History of the Freedmen's Bureau , 1955. William S. McFeely , Yankee Stepfather: General O.O. Howard and the Freedmen , 1968. Terry L....

Freedmen's Bureau

Freedmen's Bureau   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,791 words
Illustration(s):
1

...'s Bureau The Thirty-Eighth Congress established the Freedmen's Bureau so that the federal government could shoulder relief for African Americans displaced by the Civil War. Before the establishment of the Freedmen's Bureau, relief work for the contrabands (African American war refugees) was largely accomplished by private individuals and institutions. In March 1865 , as the Civil War drew to its close, the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands (Freedmen's Bureau) was established. Following Abraham Lincoln 's assassination, President Andrew...

Freedmen's Bureau

Freedmen's Bureau   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
64 words

...'s Bureau US government agency established in 1865 , at the end of the Civil War , to aid newly freed African-Americans. Administered by the War Department, the agency provided relief work and educational services, as well as legal protection for African-Americans in the South. It was a powerful instrument of Reconstruction . The Bureau also acted as a political machine, recruiting voters for the Republican...

Freedmen’s Bureau

Freedmen’s Bureau   Reference library

Terry L. Seip

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Social History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...’s Bureau To assist the adjustment of newly freed slaves in the post–Civil War South, Congress in March 1865 established the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands under the leadership of General Oliver Otis Howard and the auspices of the War Department. Given an initial life of one year, the agency provided food, clothing, fuel, and medical treatment to destitute and dislocated freedpeople and white refugees. It was also supposed to parcel out abandoned and confiscated lands in forty-acre plots to freedmen, but President Andrew Johnson, a...

Freedmen’s Bureau

Freedmen’s Bureau   Reference library

Terry L. Seip

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Political and Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics, Law, History of Law
Length:
306 words

... Freedmen ’s Bureau ceased operations in June 1872 . Overall the bureau provided invaluable relief and educational aid for the 3.9 million former slaves, but its initial promise was limited by inadequate funding and manpower, excessively paternalistic leadership, and deeply embedded racial antagonisms. [ See also Johnson, Andrew ; and Reconstruction . ] Bibliography Bentley, George R. A History of the Freedmen’s Bureau . Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1955. McFeely, William S. Yankee Stepfather: General O. O. Howard and the Freedmen ....

Freedmen’s Bureau

Freedmen’s Bureau   Quick reference

Matthew Kilburn

Dictionary Plus History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
History
Length:
76 words

...Freedmen’s Bureau US government body established in 1865 , at the end of the American Civil War, to help freed African-Americans. Its role in Reconstruction included helping to negotiate labour contracts between freed slaves and white employers, and providing food, clothing, and medical treatment to displaced people (including white refugees) in the South. Its greatest success was the establishment of 3,000 freedpeople’s schools by 1869 , courtesy of northern philanthropic groups. It was closed in 1872 . Matthew Kilburn...

Freedmen's Bureau Acts

Freedmen's Bureau Acts   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to the United States Government

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
157 words

...'s Bureau Acts ( 1865 AND 1866 ) As the Civil War ended in 1865 , Congress created the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Land, popularly known as the Freedmen's Bureau, to help former slaves make the transition to freedom. Throughout the South, the Freedmen's Bureau established schools and hospitals, helped negotiate labor contracts, leased or sold confiscated lands to the freedmen, and generally tried to protect them from former masters. The unpopularity of the Freedmen's Bureau among white Southerners caused President Andrew Johnson to...

Freedmen's Bureau Act

Freedmen's Bureau Act   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...'s Bureau Act an act passed by Congress on March 3, 1865 , to establish a bureau for blacks and whites left destitute by the Civil War . The bureau supervised all affairs relating to refugees and freedmen, such as employment and the allotment of rations, clothing, and medicine, and it controlled abandoned or confiscated lands and property. The agency received military aid and operated primarily in the former Confederate and Border states and the District of Columbia. The bureau was officially abolished on June 10, 1872...

Freedmen's Bureau

Freedmen's Bureau  

To assist the adjustment of newly freed slaves in the post–Civil War South, Congress in March 1865 established the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands under the leadership of ...
Freedmen's Bureau Act

Freedmen's Bureau Act  

(1865 AND 1866)As the Civil War ended in 1865, Congress created the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Land, popularly known as the Freedmen's Bureau, to help former slaves ...
Civil War Pension Records

Civil War Pension Records  

During Reconstruction and for years afterward, African American women exercised their citizenship rights in a variety of ways, including pursuing military pensions from the United States Pension ...
Clinton Bowen Fisk

Clinton Bowen Fisk  

(b. 8 December 1828; d. 9 July 1890), prohibitionist and the namesake of Fisk University.Clinton Bowen Fisk, the sixth son of Benjamin and Lydia Fisk, was born in Livingston ...
freedmen

freedmen  

 Emancipated slaves were more prominent in Roman society than in Greek city‐states or Hellenistic kingdoms (see slavery). Lat. lībertus/a designates the ex‐slave in relation to former owner ...
Fort Monroe

Fort Monroe  

A fort built in 1819 on the Chesapeake Bay, near Hampton, Virginia. From 1861 to 1865, during the Civil War, Fort Monroe was the only Union outpost in the Confederacy. ...
Fisk University

Fisk University  

Fisk University was started as the Fisk Free Colored School in Nashville, Tennessee, in October 1865 by the Western Freedmen's Aid Commission, the American Missionary Association, and the U.S. Bureau ...
Freedman's Savings and Trust Company

Freedman's Savings and Trust Company  

The Freedman's Savings and Trust Company, commonly known as the Freedman's Bank, was chartered by Congress in March 1865 to be a repository for the personal savings of freed slaves. ...
John Mercer Langston

John Mercer Langston  

(b. 14 December 1829; d. 15 November 1897), an African American political leader, congressman, and intellectual.Born in Virginia to a wealthy white planter and a slave mother, John Mercer ...
Colonialism

Colonialism  

Colonialism was the effort by nineteenth-century European powers to control, exploit, and inhabit other parts of the world, particularly Africa. Following Britain's abolition of the slave trade in ...
Black Theology

Black Theology  

Black Theology is a comprehensive term that developed out of both religious and quasi-secular aspirations of oppressed black people and was first used among a small group of African American ...
Welfare, Federal.

Welfare, Federal.  

The term “welfare” has been radically transformed in the last half century, narrowing from its original generic meaning to refer mainly to one disadvantaged program, Aid to Families with Dependent ...

View: