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Free-Soil Party

As sectional tensions over slavery increased following the Mexican War, both the Whig and Democratic parties experienced internal disputes. Antislavery members of both parties expressed ...

Free-Soil party

Free-Soil party   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...-Soil party an American political party organized in 1848 on a platform that opposed the admission of any new slave states into the Union . It was organized primarily by the abolitionist Liberty Party, the Whigs, and the Barnburners, a faction of the New York Democrats. Free-Soil candidates were Martin Van Buren for president and Charles Francis Adams for vice-president. In addition to opposing the extension of slavery, the platform backed a homestead law and a tariff for revenue. The party slogan was “free soil, free speech, free labor, and free men.”...

Free Soil Party

Free Soil Party   Reference library

Eric D. Daniels

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Political and Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics, Law, History of Law
Length:
486 words

...and Democratic parties fragmented, resulting in political realignments along sectional lines. In 1856 , former Free Soilers Salmon P. Chase and Charles Sumner joined discouraged Whigs, antislavery Know-Nothings, and former Liberty Party men to form the Republican Party. [ See also Antislavery Movement ; Compromise of 1850 ; Kansas– Nebraska Act ; Know-Nothing Party ; Liberty Party ; Political Parties ; Republican Party ; Van Buren, Martin ; and Whig Party . ] Bibliography Mayfield, John R. Rehearsal for Republicanism: Free Soil and the...

Free-Soil Party

Free-Soil Party   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
827 words

...-Soil Party The Free-Soil Party had its roots in the burgeoning political activism of abolitionists during the 1840s. Before that time, most abolitionists considered the rough and tumble world of politics, where compromises and underhanded dealings were commonplace, to be an inappropriate sphere for their moral agenda. The formation of the Liberty Party, as unsuccessful as it proved to be in electing candidates, broke with this tradition and suggested that antislavery programs could be adopted into political platforms. Although short lived, the Free-Soil ...

Free Soil Party.

Free Soil Party.   Reference library

Eric D. Daniels

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
461 words

...In the next two years, the Whig and Democratic parties fragmented, resulting in political realignments along sectional lines. In 1856 , former Free Soilers Salmon P. Chase and Charles Sumner joined discouraged Whigs, antislavery Know-Nothings, and former Liberty party men to form the Republican party . See also Antebellum Era ; Civil War: Causes ; Know-Nothing Party ; Political Parties . Joseph G. Rayback , Free Soil: The Election of 1848 , 1970. John R. Mayfield , Rehearsal for Republicanism: Free Soil and the Politics of Antislavery , 1979. Eric D....

Free-Soil Party

Free-Soil Party  

As sectional tensions over slavery increased following the Mexican War, both the Whig and Democratic parties experienced internal disputes. Antislavery members of both parties expressed ...
Politics and the Muslim Woman

Politics and the Muslim Woman   Reference library

Benazir Bhutto

Liberal Islam: A Sourcebook

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
3,878 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...half that of a man. Instead, in terms of compensation, the Qur'an Sharif goes on to say that if you can have retributions, a slave for a slave, a free man for a free man, a woman for a woman, or if the parties agree, they can come to an agreement on blood money or they can set a slave free [Sura 4, Verse 92] . Now the Qur'an says, “set a slave free.” It doesn’t say that if a woman is murdered set half a slave free. The Qur'an itself makes no distinction at all. It is man and it is the mulla s who claim to be the clergy of Islam—and no clergy exist in...

1 Corinthians

1 Corinthians   Reference library

John Barclay and John Barclay

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
31,224 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...as slave or free person ( vv. 21–4 ). Here the same ‘stay as you are’ principle is applied as a general rule, with legal status similarly relativized. Christian slaves can consider themselves ‘freed persons belonging to the Lord’ (freed persons usually had continuing obligations to their former owners), while Christians who are free are really ‘slaves of Christ’ ( vv. 22–3 ). This compensatory redescription of reality renders social location irrelevant to Christian obligation (and perhaps even inverts the assumed hierarchy of slave and free, see Martin ...

Universalism in Islam

Universalism in Islam   Reference library

Chandra Muzaffar

Liberal Islam: A Sourcebook

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
4,421 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...relation to the non-Malay, non-Muslim indigenous communities. 5 Since both Malayism and Bumiputraism are founded upon the notion of an indigenous people, let us consider this factor from the point of view of Islam. The Islamic party of Malaysia (PAS [ Partai Islam Se-Malaysia , or Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party]) has all along demanded the “restoration of Malay sovereignty” primarily because of the indigenous status of the community. 6 What is important to us is that its demand has invariably been presented in the name of Islam. Even a cursory...

33 The History of the Book in Poland

33 The History of the Book in Poland   Reference library

Janet Zmroczek

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
4,147 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...Poland itself. Radical Poles in London had close links with other such groups, including the Russians; 1853 saw the founding of a joint printing house for the Polish Democratic Society and Herzen’s *Free Russian Press . Between 1891 and 1903 , B. A. Jędrzejowski ( Józef Kaniowski ) ran a printing office for the Polish Socialist Party in London. 7 The 20 th century When Poland regained independence in 1918 , printing, publishing, and cultural life were reinvigorated, but many obstacles remained for the development of reading and book culture....

Islam and the Challenge of the Modern World

Islam and the Challenge of the Modern World   Reference library

Shabbir Akhtar

Liberal Islam: A Sourcebook

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
6,182 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...This is not to say—it would be plainly untrue—that one is not of this world or in this world nor, most importantly, that one is under a religious obligation to entertain hopes of a false Utopia here or elsewhere. Nor is true religion a warrant for uprooting oneself from the soil of existence by refusing to give personal passions their due: faith has its own resources for easing the burden of private emotion, such as the natural desire for legitimate power and (licit) sexual gratification. It is certainly not for Islam to undermine the normal aspirations...

Mark

Mark   Reference library

C. M. Tuckett and C. M. Tuckett

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
44,701 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...soil. The first interpretation has in its favour the fact that the other two parables in this chapter probably have a similar message. However, there is no reason why all three parables should be saying the same thing; and the fact that all three are included suggests that maybe Mark at least thought they were not simply repetitions of each other in slightly different wording. Further, the considerable detail given to the first three kinds of soil suggests that these are of interest in themselves, and are not simply negative foils to the good soil which...

A Land Divided: Judah and Israel from the Death of Solomon to the Fall of Samaria

A Land Divided: Judah and Israel from the Death of Solomon to the Fall of Samaria   Reference library

Edward F. Campbell Jr.

Oxford History of the Biblical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
19,373 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
2

...with thin soil cover surrounding upland valleys of quite fertile soil. The hills receive enough rain to sustain grain crops and fruit trees, although rainfall amounts vary from year to year and water was (and is) always a matter of concern. Springs, some of them very abundant, flow from the tilted limestone layering of the hills and provide sufficient water for settlements. This central highland region extends to the Jezreel Valley, which angles from the northeast slopes of Mount Carmel southeast to Beth-shan near the Jordan. The valleys were kept free of...

Visions of Kingdoms: From Pompey to the First Jewish Revolt

Visions of Kingdoms: From Pompey to the First Jewish Revolt   Reference library

Amy-Jill Levine

Oxford History of the Biblical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
19,480 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...religious preferences. They apparently did not accept such theological innovations as resurrection or angels ( see Acts 23.8 ), and they believed strongly in free will. While many were priests, not all were. As Temple officials, the Sadducees in the first century ce also dominated the Sanhedrin. The high priest was its president, and its senior leaders were members of the Sadducaic party. Pharisees also served in the Sanhedrin, but not infrequently the two groups disagreed. ...

Between Alexandria and Antioch: Jews and Judaism in the Hellenistic Period

Between Alexandria and Antioch: Jews and Judaism in the Hellenistic Period   Reference library

Leonard J. Greenspoon

Oxford History of the Biblical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
18,478 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
2

...to challenge Roman power. Aristobulus now had the upper hand and rapidly took advantage of his vastly improved circumstances. Pompey decided to look into these matters himself and summoned both Hyrcanus and Aristobulus to Damascus. A third party to this dispute was also given the chance to make its case. This third party consisted of a delegation from the general populace of Judea. Pompey listened to all sides, but adjourned the session without announcing his final disposition of the matter. In the interim Aristobulus acted in what Pompey interpreted...

Israel among the Nations: The Persian Period

Israel among the Nations: The Persian Period   Reference library

Mary Joan Winn Leith

Oxford History of the Biblical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
21,095 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
2

...presence in Egypt represented a direct military threat to Persia's holdings in the Levant. If the city named “Doros” on Delian League tribute lists for 454 is the coastal city of Dor just south of the Carmel range, then the Greeks had gained a strategic foothold on Palestinian soil. The participation of the Greeks in the Egyptian revolt of 460 has been described as the most serious challenge to imperial control the Persians faced in the fifth century. Megabyzus, satrap of Abar Nahara, led Artaxerxes I's forces to eventual victory in Egypt. With...

Luke

Luke   Reference library

Eric Franklin and Eric Franklin

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
46,452 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...itself is about a sower, the interpretation concentrates not upon him (for he is not even mentioned) but upon the seeds, or rather upon the soils into which the seeds fall. The soils become the hearers, and their attitudes that are described are used to account for the success or failure of the seeds. Most of the seeds are destroyed by the various deficiencies of the soils. Yet the seeds as a whole do not fail. The good soil becomes a symbol for those who exhibit the qualities that the Gentile Luke can appreciate ( v. 15 ). These bear fruit a hundredfold. Luke,...

Matthew

Matthew   Reference library

Dale C. Allison, Jr. and Dale C. Allison, Jr.

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
49,867 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...lesson in the juxtaposition of 20:20–8 and vv. 29–34 ? In the former, two privileged insiders (James and John) make a request through a third party (their mother). The request is prefaced by no title of respect or majesty, it concerns the eschatological future, and it involves personal exaltation (to sit at the right and left of the Messiah). In the latter, two outsiders (the blind men) make a request that a third party (the crowd) tries to stifle. That request is prefaced by titles of respect and majesty, concerns the present, and is for something necessary...

Transitions and Trajectories: Jews and Christians in the Roman Empire

Transitions and Trajectories: Jews and Christians in the Roman Empire   Reference library

Barbara Geller

Oxford History of the Biblical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
14,334 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...on the city. Constantine permitted Bishop Makarios of Jerusalem to destroy the temple of Aphrodite, built over the presumed tomb site of Jesus, expecting that the tomb itself would be unearthed. According to Eusebius, Constantine commanded that the place be purified and that the soil, to some depth, be taken far away inasmuch as it had been “polluted” by “demon worship.” The excavations met the expectations of the emperor and the bishop. Not only did they yield the tomb of Jesus; they also yielded Golgotha, the hill of the crucifixion. Constantine commissioned...

The Four Gospels in Synopsis

The Four Gospels in Synopsis   Reference library

Henry Wansbrough

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
30,113 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... elements and Luke taking the other. It might seem that here again the argument may run either way, except for another observation. On many occasions Matthew keeps both Mark's elements while Luke has only one ( Mk 4:5 , ‘other seed fell on rocky ground where it did not have much soil’; Mt 13:5 has both elements; Lk 8:6 has only ‘some fell on the rock’); on many occasions Luke keeps both elements while Matthew has only one ( Mk 4:39 , ‘the wind ceased and there was a dead calm’; Luke, ‘they ceased and there was a calm’; Mt 8:26 has only ‘and there was a...

Genesis

Genesis   Reference library

R. N. Whybray and R. N. Whybray

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
35,219 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...perspective—that of Palestine, where rain ( 2:5 ) is vitally important for the existence of plant and animal life. But other motifs may have Mesopotamian or other origins. In 2:7 the author chose to depict the creation of the first (male) human in terms of formation from the soil (perhaps rather, clay). This is a tradition also found among modern preliterate peoples ( Westermann 1984 : 204 ). In Egyptian mythology the god Khnum fashioned living creatures on a potter's wheel ( ANET 368, 431, 441), while in the Babylonian tradition the wild man Enkidu was...

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