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Fortune Theatre

London playhouse built in 1600 to replace the Rose, when it acquired a new neighbour, the Globe. Henslowe and Alleyn, its financiers, used the carpenter who had just completed the ...

Fortune Theatre

Fortune Theatre   Reference library

The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
133 words

... Theatre Founded in 1974 , in Dunedin, New Zealand, it is probably the southernmost English-speaking professional theatre in the world. A century after the gold rush in Otago led to the establishment of early Dunedin theatre, Patric and Rosalie Carey 's Globe Theatre made a unique contribution to New Zealand theatre, especially through the plays of James K. Baxter , yet the Fortune's professional predecessor, the Southern Theatre Trust, foundered in 1970 . From its establishment, the Fortune's intention was to produce New Zealand plays, contemporary...

Fortune Theatre

Fortune Theatre   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
195 words

... Theatre London *playhouse built in 1600 to replace the *Rose , when it acquired a new neighbour, the *Globe . *Henslowe and *Alleyn , its financiers, used the carpenter who had just completed the Globe. Located in Golding Lane in St Giles, the Fortune site was square, unlike the round Globe. The builder's contract, which survives in the Henslowe papers, specifies that it should be 24 m (80 feet) square, making the open yard a 17-m (55-foot) square, with three levels of surrounding galleries in twenty bays, and two stair towers for access to the...

Fortune Theatre

Fortune Theatre   Reference library

Andrew Gurr

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
215 words

... Theatre A London playhouse built in 1600 to replace the Rose , when it acquired a new neighbour, the Globe . Henslowe and Alleyn , its financiers, used the carpenter who had just completed the Globe. Located in Golding Lane in St Giles, the Fortune site was square, putting the building in contrast with the round features of the Globe. The builder's contract, which survives amongst the Henslowe papers, specifies that it should be 24 m (80 feet) square, making the open yard a 17-m (55-foot) square, with three levels of surrounding galleries in...

Fortune Theatre

Fortune Theatre   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
405 words

...1,000 people. It took its name from a statue of the Goddess of Fortune over the entrance. It was a popular playhouse, and drew a fashionable audience of nobles and distinguished foreign visitors. In 1621 it burnt down, and with the building perished also the wardrobe and all the playbooks. Two years later, rebuilt in brick and with a repertory of 14 new plays, it reopened, still tenanted by the same company. Though not as successful as before, the Fortune continued in use until all the theatres were closed in 1642 . Even then it was used occasionally for...

Fortune Theatre

Fortune Theatre   Quick reference

An A-Z Guide to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... Theatre Built in Finsbury, London, by the Admiral's Men in 1600 . The contract survives, and gives the external and internal dimensions, with much other information, but unfortunately says that the stage was to be ‘contrived and fashioned like unto the stage of the said playhouse called the Globe’, for which we have no detailed information. The Fortune was square, the walls eighty feet long on the outside, fifty-five feet on the inside, and forty-two feet high. It was popular till it burned down in 1621...

Fortune Theatre

Fortune Theatre  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Founded in 1974, in Dunedin, New Zealand, it is probably the southernmost English-speaking professional theatre in the world. A century after the gold rush in Otago led to the establishment ...
Fortune Theatre

Fortune Theatre  

Reference type:
Overview Page
London playhouse built in 1600 to replace the Rose, when it acquired a new neighbour, the Globe. Henslowe and Alleyn, its financiers, used the carpenter who had just completed the ...
Theatre

Theatre   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,088 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...there with what the Monthly Mirror described as ‘considerable success’. And further afield, satellites of the metropolis such as Kingston, Calcutta, Cape Town, and even the convict outpost of Sydney had their own theatres, and in some cases established companies of professional actors. Some of the latter were migrants, seeking their fortune in the colonies; others were itinerants who would return to Britain. They were augmented by a constant supply of enthusiastic amateurs—military officers mostly and, in some cases, their wives (though the involvement of...

The First Part of the Contention of the Two Famous Houses of York and Lancaster

The First Part of the Contention of the Two Famous Houses of York and Lancaster   Reference library

Randall Martin, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,732 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...fortunes, but he is in the pay of Winchester and Suffolk. 1.3 Seeking redress for feudal grievances, commoners mistakenly petition Suffolk and Margaret, who dismiss them disdainfully. Gloucester suppresses his rage against accusations of corruption, while Margaret tangles with Eleanor. Gloucester appoints a trial by combat between Peter, one of the petitioners, and Horner, who accuses him of saying York was true heir to the crown. York loses his bid to become regent in France to Somerset. 1.4 During Eleanor’s conjuring, a spirit prophesies ominous fortunes...

The Two Gentlemen of Verona

The Two Gentlemen of Verona   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,682 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the Odéon in 1902 , and proving immensely popular in Weimar Germany in Hans Rothe ’s free translation ( 1933 ): it has held the stage in Europe since the Second World War in productions such as that of Gundalf Gründgen (Düsseldorf, 1948 ). The play’s post-war fortunes in the English-speaking theatre have been more mixed. At Regent’s Park in 1949 it was heavily abridged by Robert Atkins to share a bill with The Comedy of Errors , but within ten years came two far more lavish, and highly successful, productions at the Old Vic , one (by Denis Carey ,...

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,520 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...He also opens Life in London with the traditional folk invocation to the ghosts and shades of past writers. At one point, too, he has Corinthian Kate and her friend, Sue, hurry to a fortune-teller in order to discover their prospective successes or failures in love. Concern with identifying a future husband was one of the most common features of both fortune-telling and chap-book literature. The prominence of the topic of marriage no doubt reflects the importance of courtship in the lives of the readers, and of marriage as the one sure means to...

Timon of Athens

Timon of Athens   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,245 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...its consequences. Synopsis: 1.1 Outside the rich Timon’s house a jeweller, a merchant, a mercer, a poet, and a painter cluster in hopes of his patronage, and he is visited by senators; the Poet, discussing all this with the Painter, has composed an allegory warning Timon that Fortune is fickle. Timon, arriving, speaks courteously to all his suitors, pays his friend Ventidius’ debt to free him from prison, and gives his servant Lucilius money to enable him to marry an old Athenian’s daughter. He accepts the offerings of the Poet, the Painter, and the Jeweller,...

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

A Midsummer Night’s Dream   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,220 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...in London and also at the Smock Alley theatre in Dublin, but seemed suddenly dated and artificial in a theatrical repertoire now dominated by contemporary satirical comedy: Pepys , seeing it in 1662 , called it ‘the most insipid ridiculous play that ever I saw in my life’. Thereafter its stage history for most of the next century and a half is one of successive adaptations : Betterton ’s The Fairy Queen ( 1692 ), Garrick ’s The Fairies ( 1755 ), George Colman ’s A Fairy Tale ( 1763 ), and the independent fortunes of ‘Pyramus and Thisbe’, transplanted...

All’s Well That Ends Well

All’s Well That Ends Well   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,814 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and is called The Unfortunate Comedy . Laurie Maguire and Emma Smith have recently suggested that the text of the play, first preserved in the 1623 Folio, bears features of linguistic adaptation by Thomas Middleton . Stage history: Price’s book is largely concerned with the fortunes of the play on the English stage down to the 1960s, which had amply earned it this title. No performances are recorded before a revival at Goodman’s Fields in 1741 : over the next 60 years it had only 51 London performances and for the whole of the 19th century only seventeen....

Cymbeline, King of Britain

Cymbeline, King of Britain   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,998 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...in 1560 ). Much of the other material dramatized in the play—including the banishment of the hero, the jealousy of his foolish rival, and the flight of the heroine to an unjustly banished courtier’s cave—derives from an anonymous Elizabethan play, Rare Triumphs of Love and Fortune , performed in 1582 and published in 1589 . Synopsis: 1.1 Innogen, sole remaining child of King Cymbeline (her two elder brothers having been abducted in infancy), has married the commoner Leonatus Posthumus, preferring him to her stepmother’s foolish son Cloten. Her parting...

Henry IV Part 1

Henry IV Part 1   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,574 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...Lectures on Poetry (1909) Empson, William , Seven Types of Ambiguity (1930) Greenblatt, Stephen , Shakespearian Negotiations (1988) Helgerson, Richard , Forms of Nationhood (1994) Tillyard, E. M. W. Shakespeare’s History Plays (1944) Wilson, Dover John , The Fortunes of Falstaff ...

20a The History of the Book in Britain, c.1475–1800

20a The History of the Book in Britain, c.1475–1800   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,011 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...plays from memory so that they could rush them into print (as ‘*bad’ quartos ) and turn a quick profit. Blayney challenged this view in 1997 , arguing that the publishing and reprint histories of Renaissance plays indicate that they were unlikely to have made any publisher’s fortune. Thus, Hamlet , which in its first 25 years appeared in no more than four editions (excluding the *First Folio collection of 1623 ), might be contrasted with Arthur Dent’s Sermon of Repentance (first published in 1582 ), which achieved nineteen editions over an equivalent...

Publishing

Publishing   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,242 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...essayists, and novelists from every rank of society, and persons of ‘low means’ all succeeded in reaching the reading public. How did such a heterogeneous body of authors find their way into print? The crucial vehicle was the periodical press. Any aspiring author seeking fame, fortune, or just the pleasure of seeing their words in print could send their work to a magazine proprietor, and many a career began with such an unsolicited contribution. For some, like Thomas *Chatterton , the periodical press was a lifeline, feeding empty stomachs and fostering...

20b The History of the Book in Britain, 1801–1914

20b The History of the Book in Britain, 1801–1914   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
5,058 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...novels and poetry of *Scott , whose influence on book prices was profound. His popular novels, beginning with Kenilworth in 1821 , were the first to achieve the exorbitantly high price of 31 s . 6 d . and to expand to three volumes. A noticeable but brief dip in booktrade fortunes occurred in 1826 when the firm of *Constable went bankrupt despite owning the profitable copyrights to Scott’s works as well as publishing the Edinburgh Review and the * Encyclopaedia Britannica . During the 1830s and 1840s , the book trade’s leaders maintained their...

Labour History

Labour History   Quick reference

John L. Halstead

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,401 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...1890–1979 ( 1988 ), expresses a more traditional labour history view. He also provides a useful survey of the continued debate among historians in the Historical Association journal, History (80 ( 1995 ), 259). The First World War certainly had a major impact upon Labour's fortunes, as did the Second. This can be seen especially clearly through the activities of the ‘labour’ committee, treated in an account by Royden Harrison , ‘The War Emergency: Workers’ National Committee 1914–1920’, in A. Briggs and J. Saville (eds), Essays in Labour History (...

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