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Form 20-F

In the USA, the form required by the Securities and Exchange Commission for the filing of annual results by non-US companies.

LADDER, walking under

LADDER, walking under   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Superstitions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Society and culture, Customs and Traditions
Length:
761 words

... 45. The superstition arises from the fact that when the ladder leans against the wall it forms a triangle and is thus symbolical of the Trinity. The ordinary layman of olden days would … consider himself debarred from passing through this sacred arch. Ibid. 47 [London] A woman … unconsciously passed under a ladder. Realising what she had done she promptly crossed two of her fingers … ‘I dare not unclasp my fingers till I see a dog,’ she explained to her companion. 1943 F. THOMPSON Candleford Green 119. As far as Laura ever heard, one might walk under a...

V-sign

V-sign   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

.... The quintessential British offensive gesture for most of the 20th century, formed by holding up a hand with the middle and index finger upright in a V shape, the thumb and other two fingers curled into the palm; the palm facing towards the gesturer . If asked, most people would gloss the meaning as ‘F—you’ or something similar, and it was certainly a very potent offensive gesture until recent years when it seems to be losing its ability to offend. Nevertheless, most British people would still be careful, if they needed to signify the number two in a...

Ireland

Ireland   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...centuries hundreds of other collectors would fill libraries with narratives, many of which are rooted in the oldest documents of Irish literary tradition. The voluminous files of the Irish Folklore Commission, compiled in the 20th century, are more extensive than collections from any other western European country. At the end of the 20th century, the wellsprings of this oral tradition had by no means been exhausted. Oral tradition has survived the calamitous decline of the Irish language. The 1911 census recorded that only 17.6 per cent of the population...

Gogmagog

Gogmagog   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...made for the Lord Mayor's Show of 1827 . The wooden giants of 1708 were destroyed in an air-raid in 1940 , and replaced in 1953 by a fresh pair, which still stand in the Guildhall. Hone , 1827: ii, cols. 609–17; F. W. Fairholt , Gog and Magog: The Giants in the Guildhall (1859); Robert Withington , English Pageantry (1918–20), i. 58–64; Marples , 1949: 204–12; Westwood , 1985: 23–4, 109–12, 167–70. T. C. Lethbridge 's reconstruction of the Cambridge figure(s) is set out in his Gogmagog: The Buried Gods (1957), but neither his methods nor his...

superstitions

superstitions   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...be dated to the 16th century, via a vague allusion to those ‘that make great divinations upon the spilling of salt’ ( Scot , 1584 : book 11, chapter 15). Another (black cat) can be traced to the 17th century, four to the 18th, four to the 19th; one (Friday the thirteenth) to the 20th only. It is also instructive to compare this list with that given by John Melton in Astrologaster ( 1620 ), reprinted in full in FLS News (2000). Many of his items are still known, but do not appear among our Top Ten (e.g. cat washing face, cheek/ear burning); conversely,...

May Day, children's garlands and customs

May Day, children's garlands and customs   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...Day, children's garlands and customs . The most widespread and best known May Day activity in the 19th and early 20th centuries was the children's garland custom. In essence, this involved groups of children visiting houses in their community showing a garland, singing a song, and collecting money. The custom appears to have grown directly from the earlier adult activities of ‘bringing in the May’ ( see May , bringing in), and to have proliferated during the 19th century. Children's garlanding was exactly right for the new romantic rural consciousness...

What MUST be, must be

What MUST be, must be (1604)   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... Che sera, sera , what wil be, shall be? Diuinitie, adieu. (Marlowe’s version is an amalgam of Sp. and Ital.). □ c 1386 chaucer Knight’s Tale l. 1466 Whan a thyng is shapen, it shal be. 1519 w. horman Vulgaria 20 V That the whiche muste be wyll be. 1546 j. heywood Dialogue of Proverbs ii . i. F3 That shalbe, shalbe. 1616 beaumont & fletcher Scornful Lady iii . i. I must kiss you.…What must be, must be. 1841 s. warren Ten Thousand a Year I. i. It’s really very inconvenient…for any of my young men to be absent…but—I...

You can take the BOY out of the country but you can’t take the country out of the boy

You can take the BOY out of the country but you can’t take the country out of the boy   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...the country out of the boy A change of place or circumstances will not alter the fundamental nature of a person. Originally North American, it has generated a large variety of humorous by‐forms. □ 1938 ‘ b. baer ’ in Baer & Major Hollywood ( caption to caricature of James Stewart ) You can take a boy out of the country but you can’t take the country out of a boy. 1950 f. bunce So Young a Body vii. ‘You can take the girl out of the country, but you can’t take the country out of the girl,’ Remington interjected casually. ‘Ginnie’s from a crossroads in...

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