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For Lancelot Andrewes

Subject: Literature

Critical essays by T. S. Eliot, published in 1928. The title essay is an examination of the style and thought of the 17th-century Anglican bishop, whom Eliot finds to be not only important ...

For Lancelot Andrewes

For Lancelot Andrewes   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Literature (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Literature
Length:
111 words

... Lancelot Andrewes , critical essays by T.S. Eliot , published in 1928 . The title essay is an examination of the style and thought of the 17th-century Anglican bishop, whom Eliot finds to be not only important in the history of the church, but also distinguished for his prose and his vital thought. Other subjects include Bramhall , Machiavelli , Bradley , Baudelaire , Middleton , and Crashaw . In The Humanism of Irving Babbitt , Eliot questions the possibility of a long life or significance for the New Humanism, since it is presented as an...

For Lancelot Andrewes

For Lancelot Andrewes  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Critical essays by T. S. Eliot, published in 1928. The title essay is an examination of the style and thought of the 17th-century Anglican bishop, whom Eliot finds to be not only important in the ...
Lancelot Andrewes

Lancelot Andrewes  

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Overview Page
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Religion
(1555–1626), Bp. successively of Chichester (from 1605), Ely (1609), and Winchester (1619). He attended the Hampton Court Conference (1604) and was one of the translators of the AV. When James I's ...
Joseph Mede

Joseph Mede  

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Philosophy
(1586–1638), also Mead, English biblical scholar. His best-known work, Clavis Apocalyptica (1627), interprets Rev. on the principle that its visions form a whole in chronological order; the Day of ...
Nathaniel Spinckes

Nathaniel Spinckes  

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Religion
(1653–1727), Nonjuror. He was a prebendary and rector of St Martin's, Salisbury, when he was deprived on refusing to take the oath of allegiance to William and Mary in 1690. In 1713 he was ...
origins of pamphleteering

origins of pamphleteering  

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Literature
The word ‘pamphlet’ appears to derive, curiously, from the generalized use of the title of a popular 12th‐cent. Latin love poem called Pamphilus, seu de Amore, which was adapted to ‘Pamphilet’. ...
Joseph Hall

Joseph Hall  

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Literature
(1574–1656),was successively bishop of Exeter (1627) and of Norwich (1641), where, in 1643, he was sequestered, his revenues and bishop's palace seized, his cathedral desecrated. He published two ...
Winchester

Winchester  

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Literature
Was Venta Belgarum, capital of the probably artificial civitas of the Belgae. Extensive 4th‐cent. cemeteries suggest that Winchester was still a major centre of population, but they passed out of use ...
Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey  

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Religion
Has been the setting for the coronation of English monarchs since 1066, when William the Conqueror was crowned in the new church of Edward the Confessor, perhaps to underline continuity; from Henry ...
Cambridge

Cambridge  

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The city, of Roman origin, had a remarkable number of churches and religious houses by the central Middle Ages. When Cambridgeshire was split from the diocese of Lincoln in 1109, its first bishop ...
James I

James I  

King of England, James VI of Scotland, b. 19 June 1566, s. of Henry, Lord Darnley, and Mary, queen of Scots; acc. Scotland 24 July 1567; England 24 Mar. 1603; m. Anne, da. of Frederick II of Denmark, ...
T. S. Eliot

T. S. Eliot  

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Overview Page
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Literature
(1888–1965)US-born British poet, critic, and playwright. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1948 and appointed to the OM the same year.Eliot was born in St Louis, Missouri, where he ...
Andrewes, Lancelot

Andrewes, Lancelot (1555–1626)   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
79 words

..., Lancelot ( 1555–1626 ). Anglican bishop . In 1601 he became Dean of Westminster, was consecrated bishop in 1605 , becoming bishop of Winchester in 1619 . He was famous as a preacher, and it is on his sermons and his Preces Privatae (Private Prayers) that his importance rests. T. S. Eliot regarded his sermons as ranking ‘with the finest English prose of their time, of any time’ ( For Lancelot Andrewes ): ‘He takes a word and derives a world from...

Andrewes, Lancelot

Andrewes, Lancelot (1555–1626)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
119 words

..., Lancelot ( 1555–1626 ) Theologian and preacher. Admired by James I , he headed the list of divines chosen to translate the Authorized Version of the Bible , acting as general overseer of the project as well as leading the group responsible for Genesis to 2 Kings. He was a major influence in forming a distinctively Anglican theology, pitched between the extremes of Puritanism and Roman Catholicism . His sermons, in T. S. Eliot 's view, ‘rank with the finest English prose of their time’ ( For Lancelot Andrewes , 1928 ). The opening of Eliot's...

Andrewes, Lancelot

Andrewes, Lancelot (1555–1626)   Reference library

The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
767 words

...back to Andrewes' friend Richard Hooker . His polished and elegant sermons were famous in the seventeenth century, and in the twentieth century attracted the praise of T. S. Eliot , who published a volume of critical essays under the title For Lancelot Andrewes in 1929 . In 1589 Andrewes was appointed Master of Pembroke. Elizabeth I made him one of her chaplains, and in 1601 he became Dean of Westminster. James I greatly admired Andrewes' scholarship and in 1605 made him royal almoner and Bishop of Chichester. In the same year, the Gunpowder...

Andrewes, Lancelot

Andrewes, Lancelot   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
122 words

..., Lancelot ( 1555–1626 ), English bishop and biblical scholar. Educated at Cambridge, Andrewes was successively bishop of Chicester ( 1605 ), Ely ( 1609 ), and Winchester ( 1619 ). Following the Hampton Court Conference in 1604 , which he attended, he worked on the new translation of the Bible. He defended the Oath of Allegiance, repudiating papal authority, which was imposed by James VI following the Gunpowder Plot , and sought Scottish acceptance of episcopacy. He was a key influence on the formation of Anglican theology, and gained a great...

Andrewes, Lancelot

Andrewes, Lancelot (1555–1626)   Reference library

Revd Dr John R. Guy

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
158 words

..., Lancelot ( 1555–1626 ) . Bishop of Chichester ( 1605 ), Ely ( 1609 ), and Winchester ( 1619–26 ). Educated at Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, Andrewes was a scholar of great erudition, conversant with fifteen languages. One of those appointed to prepare a new translation of the Bible ( 1604 ), he was largely responsible for the Pentateuch and historical books of the Old Testament. Both in his lifetime and subsequently his fame has largely rested on his ability as a preacher and devotional writer. His sermons were influential in formulating a distinctive...

Andrewes, Lancelot

Andrewes, Lancelot (1555–1626)   Reference library

George Westhaver

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
736 words

...ch. 1, 13–32. N. Lossky , Lancelot Andrewes, the Preacher (Paris, 1986; Eng. tr., Oxford, 1991). P. Lake , ‘Lancelot Andrewes, John Buckeridge, and Avant-Garde Conformity at the Court of James I’, in L. L. Peck (ed.), The Mental World of the Jacobean Court (Cambridge, 1991), 113–33. N. Tyacke , ‘Lancelot Andrewes and the Myth of Anglicanism’, in P. Lake and M. Questier (eds), Conformity and Orthodoxy in the English Church (Woodbridge, 2000), 5–33. P. E. McCullough , ‘Lancelot Andrewes’s Transforming Passions’, Huntington Library...

Andrewes, Lancelot

Andrewes, Lancelot (1555–1626)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
323 words

...their time’ ( For Lancelot Andrewes , 1928 ). The opening of Eliot's ‘Journey of the Magi’ (‘A cold coming we had of it’) is drawn from Andrewes 's Sermon 15: Of the Nativitie . He preached in the metaphysical style that preceded the plainer preaching of the Puritans and John Tillotson ; and incorporates minute textual analysis, classical quotations, etymological analysis, and verbal play. His Works (11 vols, ed. J. P. Wilson and James Bliss ) appeared 1841–54 . See Peter McCullough , Sermons at Court (1998) ; Lancelot Andrewes, Selected...

Andrewes, Lancelot

Andrewes, Lancelot (1555–1626)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
178 words

..., Lancelot ( 1555–1626 ), Bp. successively of Chichester (from 1605 ), Ely ( 1609 ), and Winchester ( 1619 ). He attended the Hampton Court Conference ( 1604 ) and was one of the translators of the AV. When James I ’s defence of the Oath of Allegiance was attacked by St Robert Bellarmine , Andrewes wrote a vigorous and able reply, and in 1617 he accompanied James to Scotland in an attempt to persuade the Scots to accept episcopacy. Theologically he was one of the main influences in the formation of a distinctively Anglican theology, which,...

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