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Florida

The Hispanic presence in Florida is well over four hundred years old. Spaniards explored the area in the sixteenth century and established a permanent military outpost in Saint Augustine ...

Florida

Florida (Argentina, Bolivia, Cuba, Solomon Islands, Uruguay, USA)   Quick reference

Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Place Names (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...Florida , Argentina, Bolivia, Cuba, Solomon Islands, Uruguay, USA USA: a state. Because Juan Ponce de León ( 1460–1521 ), the Spanish explorer, discovered the Florida peninsula at Easter time in 1513 and because of the lush vegetation, he named the area Florida from the Spanish Pascua Florida ‘Easter of Flowers’ or ‘Flowering Easter’. In 1763 Spain ceded Florida to England in exchange for Havana, Cuba, and twenty years later England returned it in exchange for The Bahamas. In 1819 a treaty was signed which ceded Florida to the USA with effect...

Florida

Florida   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
194 words

... florida Statehood: March 3, 1845 Nickname: Sunshine State State bird: Mockingbird State flower: Orange blossom State tree: Sabal palm State motto: In God we trust State in the extreme se USA, occupying a peninsula between the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico; the capital is Tallahassee . Florida forms a long peninsula with thousands of lakes, many rivers and vast areas of swampland. At the s tip there is a chain of small islands, the Florida Keys, stretching w . The biggest attractions are the Everglades , Florida Keys, and Disney World in ...

Florida

Florida   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... In 1512 Ponce de León sailed to the west in search of the fountain of youth . He first saw land the following year shortly before easter , popularly called in Spain Pascua florida , ‘flowery Easter’, and on that account, prompted also by the lush spring vegetation, called the land Florida. It is also called the Peninsula State. Its city of St Augustine, founded in 1565 , is the oldest European settlement in the...

Florida

Florida   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
2,714 words

... The first Europeans to arrive in Florida did so in a mission led by the Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León in 1513 . Ponce de León's expedition included two free Africans, who were the first blacks to set foot on continental North America. Florida's African American past is thus the longest of any region in the United States; it is also very possibly the most unusual. Even though the relative size of Florida's black population (both slave and free) never rivaled that of the Anglo-American South, blacks played a vital role in Florida's defenses, economy,...

Florida

Florida   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Exploration

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History
Length:
562 words

... . After the donations of Pope Alexander VI (r. 1492–1503 ), Spaniards explored the Gulf of Mexico and the North American southeast. In Florida, small numbers of Europeans attempted to impose their will on 350,000 Native Americans. The Spanish crown licensed Juan Ponce de León and de Ayllón to conquer and settle Florida, while the French king sent Giovanni da Verrazano to explore North America. Spain then issued contracts to Pánfilo de Narváez and Hernando de Soto , while the French sponsored two Florida journeys of Jacques Cartier. The Tampa...

Florida

Florida   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latinos and Latinas in the United States

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,754 words

... . The Hispanic presence in Florida is well over four hundred years old. Spaniards explored the area in the sixteenth century and established a permanent military outpost in Saint Augustine more than two hundred years before the American Revolution. Spain lost its Florida colony to England in 1763 , regained it in 1783 , and transferred it permanently to the United States in 1819 . Florida grew slowly in the nineteenth century. However, in the twentieth century few states have grown more quickly or diversified more rapidly than Florida. In particular,...

Florida

Florida   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History 1896 to the Present

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
3,536 words

...T. Moore , would spearhead the state's voting rights movement in the 1940s. All of Florida's black colleges—Florida A&M, Edward Waters College, Florida Memorial College, and Bethune-Cookman—operated with severely limited resources and struggled against white condescension. Yet somehow they managed to survive, nurturing generations of students, some of whom gravitated toward activities and professions normally reserved for whites. The Tribal Twenties. The onset of the “Florida Boom” in 1919 brought a population surge that whitened the state's population...

Florida

Florida   Quick reference

Howard Sargeant

Dictionary Plus Social Sciences

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
184 words

...Florida A state in the south-eastern USA. Known as the Sunshine State, it consists of a peninsula bounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the east and the Gulf of Mexico to the west. Settled by Spanish colonists in the sixteenth century, it was purchased by America in 1819 and, seceding from the Union in 1861 , remained largely unaffected by the turmoil of the Civil War, owing perhaps to its remote geographical position. One of the most popular global tourist destinations, the state is synonymous with amusement parks and its Walt Disney World Resort is the most popular...

Florida Current

Florida Current   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Weather (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008

... Current The warm-water current that flows northwards from the Straits of Florida to Cape Hatteras. It then leaves the continental slope as it turns towards the north-east and combines with the Antilles Current to become the Gulf Stream...

Florida, Richard

Florida, Richard (1958–)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
53 words

..., Richard ( 1958– ) An American economic geographer who popularized the terms ‘ creative class ’ and ‘creative cities’, and who advises business and government on how to achieve post-industrial success. Florida is a rare example of a modern geographer who has successfully established himself and his ideas in public...

Florida current

Florida current   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... current Part of the Gulf Stream that extends from the southern tip of Florida to Cape Hatteras, N. Carolina. It is a fast-flowing (1–3 m/s), narrow (50–75 km wide), and deep current, still evident at depths of 2000 m where velocities of up to 10 cm/s have been measured. It is an example of a western boundary ...

Florida Current

Florida Current   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... Current Part of the Gulf Stream that extends from the southern tip of Florida to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. It is a fast-flowing (100–300 cm/s), narrow (50–75 km wide), and deep current, still evident at depths of 2000 m, where velocities of up to 10 cm/s have been measured. It is an example of a western boundary current...

Seminole Tribe of Florida v. Florida

Seminole Tribe of Florida v. Florida   Reference library

Kermit L. Hall

The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Law
Length:
967 words

...rights. In its appeal to the high court, Florida was joined by thirty‐one other states, all of whom feared that should the Indian Gaming Act stand, Congress would be able in other areas, such as the environment, business practices, health, and safety, to erode their sovereign authority. In arguing before the justices, counsel for Florida insisted that the gaming law directly commanded the states to do certain things in such a way that made them mere subdivisions of the national government. The Seminole tribe of Florida and the United States government argued...

Seminole Tribe of Florida v. Florida

Seminole Tribe of Florida v. Florida   Quick reference

The Oxford Guide to United States Supreme Court Decisions (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
969 words

...rights. In its appeal to the high court, Florida was joined by thirty-one other states, all of whom feared that should the Indian Gaming Act stand, Congress would be able in other areas, such as the environment, business practices, health, and safety, to erode their sovereign authority. In arguing before the justices, counsel for Florida insisted that the gaming law directly commanded the states to do certain things in such a way that made them mere subdivisions of the national government. The Seminole tribe of Florida and the United States government argued...

Florida Studio Theatre

Florida Studio Theatre   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Theatre (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
69 words

... Studio Theatre (Sarasota). A small but noteworthy theatre dedicated to new works, it was founded in 1973 by Jon Spelman with the idea of presenting small‐cast plays and musicals in an intimate setting. The company's main stage seats only 167 and its cabaret space is even smaller and more flexible. New works are encouraged by the group's Florida Playwrights Festival and its award of residencies for promising...

Florida State University

Florida State University   Reference library

Dale Hudson and Steven N. Kelly

The Grove Dictionary of American Music (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
202 words

... State University . State university located in Tallahassee. Originally named the Florida Institute in 1854 , the school became Florida State College in 1901 and Florida State College for Women in 1909 . In 1947 the institution became coeducational and was renamed Florida State University. Classes in music were among the first offered at the newly named college in 1901 , and the School of Music was established in 1902 . The first bachelor's degree in music was awarded in 1911 . The school became a College of Music in 2005 , and in 2009 ...

Windover, Florida, USA

Windover, Florida, USA ([Si])   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
142 words

...Florida, USA [Si] Middle Archaic Stage burial ground dating to the period 5000–6000 bc , in a peat bog near Cape Canaveral. The site, which had remarkable preservation because of the waterlogged conditions, was excavated by G. Doran in 1982 . The burials were flexed. Seven types of woven textiles, probably of palmetto fibre, have been identified, including blankets, mats, and a bag deposited with the deceased. One 12‐year‐old was buried with a range of grave goods, including a stone biface, bone awls, a shark's tooth, and barbed bone points. A...

Hoyt v. Florida

Hoyt v. Florida   Reference library

Leslie Friedman Goldstein

The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Law
Length:
284 words

...v. Florida , 368 U.S. 57 ( 1961 ), argued 19 Oct. 1961 , decided 12 Mar. 1961 by vote of 9 to 0; Harlan for the Court, Warren, joined by black and Douglas , concurring. Gwendolyn Hoyt killed her husband with a baseball bat during a marital dispute over his adultery. She had offered to forgive and take him back, but his refusal provoked the homocide. She pleaded “temporary insanity” ( see Insanity Defense ) and was convicted of second‐degree murder by an all‐male jury. Florida law provided that no female could serve on a jury unless she had...

Hoyt v. Florida

Hoyt v. Florida   Quick reference

The Oxford Guide to United States Supreme Court Decisions (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
273 words

...v. Florida , 368 U.S. 57 ( 1961 ), argued 19 Oct. 1961 , decided 12 Mar. 1961 by vote of 9 to o; Harlan for the Court, Warren (with Black and Douglas) concurring. Gwendolyn Hoyt killed her husband with a baseball bat during a marital dispute over his adultery. She had offered to forgive and take him back, but his refusal provoked the homocide. She pleaded “temporary insanity” and was convicted of second-degree murder by an all-male jury. Florida law provided that no female could serve on a jury unless she had specifically requested to be put on the jury...

Strata Florida Abbey

Strata Florida Abbey   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to Literary Britain & Ireland (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature, Society and culture
Length:
86 words

...Florida Abbey Cardiganshire Situated to the E of the B4343 Tregaron‐Devil's Bridge road, near the village of Pont‐rhydfendigaid, the now ruined Abbey was once one of the most celebrated monasteries in Wales, and the burial place of princes of the house of Dinefwr. There is a tablet inside the walls in memory of the poet Dafydd ap Gwilym , who is traditionally believed to be buried under a yew tree in the graveyard outside the monastery (though Talley Abbey has a rival claim to his...

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