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Overview

Fault Liability

Subject: Law

“Fault” is a type of liability in which the plaintiff must prove that the defendant’s conduct was either negligent or intentional; fault-based liability is the opposite of strict ...

Fault Liability

Fault Liability   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Law
Length:
37 words

... Liability . “Fault” is a type of liability in which the plaintiff must prove that the defendant’s conduct was either negligent or intentional; fault-based liability is the opposite of strict liability. See also Torts Mark F....

no-fault liability

no-fault liability   Reference library

Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
26 words

...no-fault liability Legal responsibility (liability) to compensate another person for injury, irrespective of any carelessness or negligence on the part of the person required to...

fault‐based civil liability

fault‐based civil liability   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
281 words

...‐based civil liability Civil liability is contrasted with criminal liability. Civil liability can be either for fault or regardless of fault (‘strict’). In civil law ( tort law and contract law , for instance), fault means either intention or negligence. In criminal law intention is further distinguished from (less culpable) recklessness ; but in civil law, ‘intention’ is typically used to include recklessness. Criminal law's finer discrimination makes allowance for the special stigma that attaches to liability and punishment for serious crime as...

criminal liability without fault

criminal liability without fault   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
743 words

...liability without fault A defendant can normally be convicted of a serious criminal offence if he was at fault for perpetrating that offence. At least since the nineteenth century it has been regarded a fundamental principle of criminal law that there should be no crime without fault. However, many criminal offences do not adhere to this principle, or adhere to it only partially. Liability without fault ranges from health and safety legislation to environmental legislation to some very serious criminal offences. For some criminal offences, there is...

fault‐based criminal liability

fault‐based criminal liability   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
761 words

...‐based criminal liability Criminal lawyers often regarded it as a fundamental principle of criminal law that a defendant should not be convicted of a criminal offence if he was not at fault, or not sufficiently at fault, for committing that offence. Imposing criminal liability on the defendant normally involves moral condemnation of his behaviour and punishment for it. It is commonly thought that such condemnation and punishment is appropriate only if the defendant was sufficiently morally blameworthy for what he did. For this reason, most serious criminal...

Fault Liability

Fault Liability  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
“Fault” is a type of liability in which the plaintiff must prove that the defendant’s conduct was either negligent or intentional; fault-based liability is the opposite of strict liability.See also ...
fault-based civil liability

fault-based civil liability  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Civil liability is contrasted with criminal liability. Civil liability can be either for fault or regardless of fault (‘strict’). In civil law (tort law and contract law, for instance), fault ...
fault-based criminal liability

fault-based criminal liability  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Criminal lawyers often regarded it as a fundamental principle of criminal law that a defendant should not be convicted of a criminal offence if he was not at fault, or ...
no-fault liability

no-fault liability  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Legal responsibility (liability) to compensate another person for injury, irrespective of any carelessness or negligence on the part of the person required to pay.
criminal liability without fault

criminal liability without fault  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
A defendant can normally be convicted of a serious criminal offence if he was at fault for perpetrating that offence. At least since the nineteenth century it has been regarded ...
Romans

Romans   Reference library

Craig C. Hill and Craig C. Hill

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
30,053 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...‘pursuit’ of law itself or the inability to ‘attain’ (‘catch up with’, Fitzmyer 1993 : 577 ) law that Paul faults. If the former, Paul might be saying that Israel's pursuit of ‘legal righteousness’ could not lead them to the law's true goal (as possibly in 10:4 ). If the latter, Paul might mean that Israel attempted but failed to live righteously according to the precepts of the law. In either case, succeeding verses make clear that the actual fault of the Jews is their unbelief in Christ, whom they insensibly overlooked ( 10:2–3 ), over whom they have...

Proverbs

Proverbs   Reference library

K. T. Aitken and K. T Aitken

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
20,819 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of life ( cf. 18:11 ), whereas the poor have no resources to fall back on. For this the poor may sometimes have only themselves to blame ( v. 4 ). But not all wealth is advantageous. How it is acquired is the test of whether it is an asset or a liability ( v. 2 ). The instruction in 1:8–19 illustrates the liability of ill-gotten gain (cf. also 20:17; 21:6; 28:20 ). By contrast, the wealth that accrues through ‘righteousness’, i.e. honesty and integrity, is a mark of divine blessing and provides for a long, secure, and anxiety-free life ( v. 22; cf. 11:4 )....

Deuteronomy

Deuteronomy   Reference library

Christoph Bultmann and Christoph Bultmann

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
28,352 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...human inability to fully understand the past ( 29:25–8 ) or the future ( 30:1–10 ). It may also refer to a concealed background of the Torah which would be irrelevant to obedience ( 30:11–14 ), or an interpretation in the light of Ps 19:12 (MT 19:13 ), which speaks of ‘secret faults’, might also be a possibility. NJPS reads: ‘Concealed acts concern the Lord our God; but with overt acts, it is for us and our children ever to apply all the provisions of this Teaching.’ ( 30:1–10 ) Hope for Future Restoration From the image of the land devastated by a curse,...

strict civil liability

strict civil liability  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Civil liability is contrasted with criminal liability; and strict liability is contrasted with fault‐based liability. Although not uncommon, strict criminal liability is much more controversial than ...
culpa tenet suos auctores

culpa tenet suos auctores  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
[Latin: a fault binds its own authors]A maxim meaning that the only person liable for a fault is he who is the direct author of it. Thus it would exclude vicarious liability.
absolute liability

absolute liability  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
In criminal law and torts, the liability of a defendant irrespective of a mental element (the plaintiff need not prove negligence or a fault element in order to establish a ...
legal liability

legal liability  

A form of accountability that has the force of law. Statutory or case law can be used to enforce it. In public health services, authorities or individual professional staff members identified by name ...
strict liability

strict liability  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Imposed, in tort law, even if the defendant did not intend to cause harm and acted with reasonable care. Its most significant use is in products liability.See also Fault Liability[...]
exculpatory

exculpatory  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Excusing or clearing from charge, guilt or fault. To exculpate is to justify or absolve from liability or criminal responsibility.
vicarious liability

vicarious liability  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Legal liability imposed on one person for torts or crimes committed by another (usually an employee but sometimes an independent contractor or agent), although the person made vicariously liable is ...

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