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Extreme Events

Among the possible consequences of global climate change are changes in the severity and frequency of extreme events such as floods, droughts, tropical cyclones, and severe thunderstorms. ...

Extreme Events

Extreme Events   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Global Change

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

... Events Among the possible consequences of global climate change are changes in the severity and frequency of extreme events such as floods, droughts, tropical cyclones, and severe thunderstorms. [ See Drought and Tropical Cyclones in a Warming World .] These events entail large societal costs, including injury, loss of life, property loss, and impairment of business; changes in their intensity and frequency are therefore of special concern. In developing nations, loss of life from such events can be extreme. For example, a tropical cyclone in...

Extreme Events

Extreme Events   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Global Change

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

... Events Among the possible consequences of global climate change are changes in the severity and frequency of extreme events such as floods, droughts, tropical cyclones, and severe thunderstorms. [See Drought .] These events entail large societal costs, including injury, loss of life, property loss, and impairment of business; and changes in their intensity and frequency are therefore of special concern. In developing nations, loss of life from such events can be extreme. For example, a tropical cyclone in Bangladesh in 1970 killed nearly half a...

Extreme Episodic Events

Extreme Episodic Events   Reference library

Vincent P. GUTSCHICK

Berkshire Encyclopedia of Sustainability

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Science and technology, Social sciences
Length:
1,857 words

... Extreme Episodic Events Major challenges exist in recognizing extreme events and their causal chains. Some, but not all, extreme events are recognizable, and then to varying degrees. Events of long duration, particularly the positive extremes, are not readily apparent while they are taking place, such as the long intervals of equable climate in the Medieval Warm Period ( 950–1250 ce ) or at the peak of the Roman Empire. Some extreme events, such as earthquakes and hurricanes, originate without essential involvement of humans or other biological...

Personal Experience, Extreme Weather Events, and Perceptions of Climate Change

Personal Experience, Extreme Weather Events, and Perceptions of Climate Change   Reference library

Christopher P. Borick and Barry G. Rabe

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Climate Change Communication

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...party affiliation, with Democrats and Republicans using weather events in varied ways to explain their beliefs regarding global warming. The effects of extreme weather events such as drought, flooding, and hurricanes in the United States on beliefs regarding global warming were examined by Konisky, Hughes, and Kaylor ( 2016 ) through the use of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Storm Events Database. In this study, the authors brought together NOAA’s weather events data with measures of public opinion regarding climate change...

Extreme Events

Extreme Events  

Among the possible consequences of global climate change are changes in the severity and frequency of extreme events such as floods, droughts, tropical cyclones, and severe thunderstorms. [See ...
Revolution

Revolution   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,734 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...revolution of 1642–8 and, thereby, the execution of Charles I . Arguably Burke 's early and extreme revulsion also owed much to his scorching experience during the *Gordon riots of June 1780 . As well as being vilified by Protestant Association propaganda, he had been personally threatened by the mob and—in a retreat from *Whig principles—had welcomed the armed military intervention which had been personally instigated by George III . To celebrate events in France was, for Burke, to celebrate civil war and mob violence. To advance the claims of ...

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Quick reference

Charles Phythian-Adams

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,654 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Isles is now seriously fragmented. Most fundamental, perhaps, are underlying differences in approach and stress. At one extreme is the museum‐led ethnological emphasis (especially in Celtic countries) that stems from the chronologically late survival within those regions of traditional cultures of work—both material and oral—and consequently an intellectual sensitivity to localized rural resources and contexts. At the other extreme is what will concern much of this essay: the academic approach to social (and predominantly documentary) history at the end of...

1 Writing Systems

1 Writing Systems   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,152 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
7

...sense, as applied to ancient scripts, ‘deciphered’ means different things to different scholars. At one extreme, everyone agrees that the Egyptian hieroglyphs have been deciphered—because every trained Egyptologist would make the same sense of virtually every word of a given hieroglyphic inscription (though their individual translations would still differ, as do all independent translations of the same work from one language into another). At the other extreme, (almost) every scholar agrees that the script of the Indus Valley civilization is undeciphered—because...

Poetry

Poetry   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,432 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...savage torpor. The most effective of these causes are the great national events which are daily taking place, and the encreasing accumulation of men in cities, where the uniformity of their occupations produces a craving for extraordinary incident which the rapid communication of intelligence hourly gratifies. In this passage Wordsworth sketches the historical geography of his Romanticism. Paris and the *French Revolution , London and the *war [2] with France: these scenes and events are Wordsworth's emblems of dislocation. To live in their midst is to...

Place-Names

Place-Names   Quick reference

Margaret Gelling

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,757 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...for confirmation of views already formulated. There was little challenge to the ‘clean‐sweep’ theory regarding the events of the Dark Ages , by which it was assumed that the post‐Roman inhabitants of most of England were numerically overwhelmed and politically subjugated by large numbers of immigrant Germanic people, and that the continuous history of England began with this immigration. Scientific place‐name study rendered the most extreme 19th‐century assumptions about the Anglo‐Saxon conquest of Britain untenable, but the result was a modification rather...

Natural Philosophy (Science)

Natural Philosophy (Science)   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,186 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...process. The details of these reflections cannot be examined here, but the fascination with scientific fields beyond the core of the Newtonian system resonates with some of Priestley's remarks about a new direction for natural philosophy. For Coleridge, the departure was more extreme: he saw the sciences of chemistry, *geology , electricity, biology, and comparative anatomy as the foundations of a less mechanistic and atomistic, more organic and dynamic, natural philosophy. More so than Priestley, Coleridge stressed the qualitative differences between the...

Enlightenment

Enlightenment   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
7,794 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...us with a flexible way of looking at it in Britain—thus it could be more or less political, more or less religious, more or less class-based, more or less shaped by national aspirations. However, this approach does set boundaries to the Enlightenment beyond which lie either more extreme forms of modernity or more retrenched forces of tradition. In this view one could be a sceptic but not a total sceptic, a Christian but not an intolerant or rigidly orthodox one, an admirer of the status quo but not utterly uncritical. With the unions between England and Scotland...

5 The European Medieval Book

5 The European Medieval Book   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
9,862 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...against several others, wisely or carelessly, or may have been taken from a very recent exemplar or one which was already many centuries old, or both. The lines of textual descent are predicated by—and are sometimes actually evidence of—trade routes and cultural exchanges of extreme and fascinating complexity. The universality of Latin, the principal language of most west European MSS before (and even after) the 13 th century, accorded an internationalism to the book trade which it has never really recovered, even today. If the differences in physical...

Scottish Local and Family History

Scottish Local and Family History   Quick reference

David moody

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,622 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...from English. If mythologies play a part in determining the agenda of historians, England provides a persuasive sense of continuity, typified by the sturdy independent yeoman or burgess. In Scotland there has been little continuity and little independence. But there has been extreme poverty, starvation even. Villages hardly existed before the end of the 18th century; and to find a domestic dwelling dating from earlier than 1800 is relatively rare. Much less than 1 per cent of Scotland's housing stock pre‐dates 1851 . There is a shortage, too, of artefacts...

Historic Churches

Historic Churches   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,420 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and evening prayer remain as in time past, saving that all images, shrines, tabernacles, rood loftes and monuments of idolatrie are removed, taken down and defaced: Onlie the stories in glasse windowes excepted, which, for want of sufficient store of new stuffe, and by reason of extreme charge that should grow by the alteration of the same into white panes throughout the realme, are not altogether abolished in most places at once, but by little and little suffered to decaie that white glass may be set up in their roomes.’ The paintings which have been...

28 The History of the Book in Italy

28 The History of the Book in Italy   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
10,068 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...an advanced age: an energetic figure, such as Julius II (r. 1503–13 ), could mould events, but reigns were so short that enemies rode out the storm. The political set-up meant, therefore, not only that there was no single central market represented by a capital (such as Paris or London), but also that, when by the late 18 th century the book industry needed vigorous institutional measures, the Italian states were too weak and too divided to supply them. The second event contributing to the long-term decline of the Italian publishing industry was the...

extreme value theory

extreme value theory  

Reference type:
Overview Page
In statistical analysis, a theory relating to the occurrence of unlikely events. It has become a key element in the analysis of financial risks, which are often in the extreme tails of distributions.
Extreme Weather

Extreme Weather  

As the perception (and/or the actual occurrence) grows of more frequent extreme weather events, there is an important need to archive and verify the occurrence of extreme or record weather ...
hindcasting

hindcasting  

The retrospective analysis of the synoptic situation to determine the causes of a specific weather event. Although such analysis is usually undertaken for unforeseen extreme events, it may also be ...
Northeast Snowfall Impact Scale

Northeast Snowfall Impact Scale  

(NESIS)A scale that ranks snowfall events in the northeastern United States in terms of their impact on society as a whole. The formula used is a function of the area covered by the snowstorm, the ...

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