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Eusebios of Nikomedeia

Arian bishop of Nikomedeia (from ca.318); bishop of Constantinople (from 338/9); died ca.342, probably at Constantinople. Eusebios was a fellow pupil of Arius under Lucian of Antioch. ...

Eusebios of Nikomedeia

Eusebios of Nikomedeia   Reference library

Barry Baldwin and Alice-Mary Talbot

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
220 words

... of Nikomedeia , Arian bishop of Nikomedeia (from ca. 318 ); bishop of Constantinople (from 338/9 ); died ca. 342 , probably at Constantinople. Eusebios was a fellow pupil of Arius under Lucian of Antioch . After Arius's condemnation ca. 320 , Eusebios, who had just become bishop of Nikomedeia, organized an epistolary campaign in support of Arius. Although Eusebios subscribed to the decisions of the Council of Nicaea in 325 , he was soon exiled to Gaul by Constantine I on charges of supporting the Meletians (see Meletian Schism ) . After his...

Eusebios of Nikomedeia

Eusebios of Nikomedeia  

Arian bishop of Nikomedeia (from ca.318); bishop of Constantinople (from 338/9); died ca.342, probably at Constantinople. Eusebios was a fellow pupil of Arius under Lucian of Antioch. After Arius's ...
Anthimos of Nikomedeia

Anthimos of Nikomedeia  

Martyr under Diocletian and saint; feastday 3 Sept. According to Eusebios of Caesarea (Eusebios, HE 8.6.6), Anthimos (Ἄνθιμος), bishop of Nikomedeia, was decapitated in 303; he was among those ...
Nikomedeia

Nikomedeia   Reference library

Clive F. W. Foss

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
453 words

... John (VI) Kantakouzenos rescued it with his fleet. The city finally fell to Orhan in 1337 . Nikomedeia preserves much of its fortifications, the long city walls of Diocletian, and the medieval hilltop fortress, which appears to be of the 12th–14th C. As a metropolitan bishopric Nikomedeia played a major role under Eusebios of Nikomedeia , but later yielded in importance to Nicaea . lit . Janin , Églises centres 77–104. Clive F. W....

Anthimos of Nikomedeia

Anthimos of Nikomedeia   Reference library

Alexander Kazhdan and Nancy Patterson Ševčenko

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
222 words

...of Nikomedeia , martyr under Diocletian and saint; feastday 3 Sept. According to Eusebios of Caesarea (Eusebios, HE 8.6.6), Anthimos (Ἄνθιμος), bishop of Nikomedeia, was decapitated in 303 ; he was among those charged with setting fire to the imperial palace in Nikomedeia. A Life attributed to Symeon Metaphrastes presents the trial and torture of Anthimos by Maximian . It is questionable whether any of his writings survive: the legend of Sts. Domna and Indes mentions a letter of Anthimos to persecuted communities (PG 116:1073C–1076B); a fragment,...

Eusebios

Eusebios   Reference library

Alexander Kazhdan

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
275 words

... (Εὑσέβιος), personal name (meaning “pious”). The name first appeared in the 4th C. and immediately spread widely in the Christian and the pagan milieus: we know several pupils of Libanios who are called Eusebios as well as many officials whose religious beliefs cannot be determined. PLRE 1:301–09 lists 43 Eusebioi of the 4th C., to whom several clergymen should be added—bishops of Caesarea, Nikomedeia, Emesa , and others (A. Jülicher, RE 6 [ 1909 ] 1439–44). PLRE 2:428–33 contains fewer men of this name in the 5th C.—only 29. Sozomenos is...

Arius

Arius   Reference library

Timothy E. Gregory and Alexander Kazhdan

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
351 words

...(Ἄρειος), theologian, founder of Arianism ; born Libya? ca. 250 , died Constantinople 336. A student of Lucian of Antioch , after ordination as a priest he became a popular preacher in Alexandria, and ca. 318 his teachings began to excite controversy. Because he said that Christ was not coeternal with the Father, Alexander , bishop of Alexandria, condemned him and he fled to Nikomedeia. The controversy soon spread throughout the East, and Arius won the support of many influential churchmen such as Eusebios of Nikomedeia . Constantine I became involved...

Ulfilas

Ulfilas   Reference library

Alexander Kazhdan

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
166 words

...(Οὐ̑λφίλας), “bishop of the Goths”; born Cappadocia? ca. 311 , died Constantinople 382/3. Captured by the Goths in 337 , Ulfilas was sent by them as a member of an embassy to Constantinople where Eusebios of Nikomedeia ordained him as bishop. During his activity among the Goths, Ulfilas translated the Bible (or part of it) into Gothic. In 360 he became an adherent of Arianism and signed the creed of the Homoiousians ; his activity thus contributed to the entrenchment of this doctrine among 4th-C. Germanic people. The role of Ulfilas has been...

Eusebios of Caesarea

Eusebios of Caesarea   Reference library

Alexander Kazhdan and Barry Baldwin

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
789 words

...as soon as the edict of tolerance was issued by Galerius , he was elected bishop of Caesarea. He became Constantine I the Great's favorite and a historiographer and participated in many theological discussions of the period. He perceived the threat represented by Monarchianism and was tolerant, even supportive, of the Arians; allied with Eusebios of Nikomedeia he actively contributed to the deposition of the orthodox Eustathios of Antioch in 330 and Athanasios of Alexandria in 335 . He also participated in the Council of Constantinople in 336 ...

Constantine I the Great

Constantine I the Great   Reference library

Timothy E. Gregory and Anthony Cutler

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
626 words
Illustration(s):
1

...of secular structures, whereas Eusebios of Caesarea emphasizes the churches and martyria that Constantine built in the capital and at Nikomedeia , Antioch , and Jerusalem . Like most of his predecessors, Constantine sought divine support for his rule and ultimately came to base his power on a special connection with the Christian God. This concept developed slowly, augmented by the emperor's victories, and culminating in the image of Constantine in the works of Eusebios of Caesarea, esp. the Vita Constantini . In the latter work ( VC 4.15) Eusebios...

Babylas

Babylas   Reference library

Alexander Kazhdan and Nancy Patterson Ševčenko

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
254 words

...Hagiographical texts transfer Babylas's martyrdom to the reign of Numerianus ( 283–84 ) and sometimes provide Babylas with companions in martyrdom: a Greek text associates three children with him, while a Georgian legend describes a certain Basil of Epiphaneia, who was executed for his support of Babylas. Another stage in the development of the legend was the creation of St. Babylas of Nikomedeia, who was venerated on the same day. Representation in Art Miniatures illustrating the vita of Babylas written by Symeon Metaphrastes depict the saint as an...

Paul I

Paul I   Reference library

Alexander Kazhdan

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
295 words

...of Constantinople (ca. 337–39 ; end of 341 –beginning of 342 ; and beginning of 346 – Sept. 351 ) and saint; born Thessalonike ca. 300 , died Koukousos 351 ?; feastday 6 Nov. Scholars differ in their evaluation of Paul: for Telfer , he is a figure equal in significance to Ambrose of Milan, whereas Dagron attributes to Paul a minor role in events that was subsequently magnified by hagiographical legend. Paul was elected to the see of Constantinople ca. 337 , but soon replaced by the Arian Eusebios of Nikomedeia . After the death of Eusebios, Paul...

Markellos of Ankyra

Markellos of Ankyra   Reference library

Barry Baldwin

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
323 words

...councils of Rome ( 340 ) and Serdica ( 343 ), and finally deposed and exiled in 347 . He was condemned as a heretic in 381 in canon 1 of the First Council of Constantinople. Little remains of the voluminous writings ascribed to him by Jerome ( De viris illustribus 86). The Profession of Faith required of him for the council at Rome survives, but only fragments of the diatribe against Asterios. He is probably the author of the tract On the Holy Church ascribed to Anthimos of Nikomedeia ( Richard , Opera minora 2, no.33). Markellos attacked Arianism...

Helena

Helena   Reference library

Timothy E. Gregory

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
379 words

...the newly wed spouse of Helena's favorite, Crispus . In her honor Drepanon was renamed Helenoupolis, and the province of Helenopontus was created. Circa 325 both Helena and Fausta received the title of augusta. After the execution of Crispus in 326 , Helena may have played a role in the murder of Fausta. Helena was apparently inclined to Arianism, venerating Lucian of Antioch , the teacher of Arius and Eusebios of Nikomedeia . In 326 she set out on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, where she founded and generously endowed churches of the Nativity in...

Apollonios of Tyana

Apollonios of Tyana   Reference library

Alexander Kazhdan and Alice-Mary Talbot

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
339 words

...(ca. 307 ) argued that Apollonios was a greater worker of miracles than Jesus ; Apollonios was also praised by Flavianus Nicomachus and in the Historia Augusta . His image appears on contorniates . Eusebios of Caesarea (PG 22:795–868) wrote a response ca. 312 to the claims of Hierokles, denouncing Apollonios as a charlatan who was perhaps in league with evil spirits. Nonetheless, the Christian world was slow to reject the cult of Apollonios. Until the 12th C. Byz. authors (Malalas, Kedrenos , Tzetzes ) mention him in favorable light, remembering his...

Irrigation

Irrigation   Reference library

Alexander Kazhdan and John W. Nesbitt

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
318 words

...as well as for water mills; a case on Crete around 1118 describes a conflict between a mill owner and farmers tilling the “irrigated choraphia ” (MM 6:96.14–22) who were deprived of water by construction of the mill. The Byz. did not build great canal networks. Justinian dreamed of a canal project between the Melas, a tributary of the Sangarios, and the harbor of Nikomedeia, but the idea was abandoned (F.G. Moore, AJA 54 [ 1950 ] 108–10). J.P. Oleson , Greek and Roman Mechanical Water-Lifting Devices (Toronto 1984). T. Schiøler , Roman and Islamic...

Theophilos the Indian

Theophilos the Indian   Reference library

Alexander Kazhdan and Leslie S. B. MacCoull

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
262 words

...born island of Dibous (probably the Maldive Islands, near Ceylon), died after 364 . His life is described in detail by Philostorgios . As a young man he was sent to the court of Constantine I where Eusebios of Nikomedeia ordained him deacon. Although Constantius II respected him, he still banished Theophilos for his support of the caesar Gallus . Famous for working miracles, Theophilos was recalled to Constantinople and acquired even greater renown for healing the empress Eusebia. In 356 Constantius II sent him to the ethnarch of Saba ( Ḥimyar )...

Silvester I

Silvester I   Reference library

Alexander Kazhdan

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
279 words

...not by Eusebios in Nikomedeia but by Silvester in Rome; Malalas was familiar with this legend in the 6th C. The date when the legend reached Constantinople is debatable: C. Mango and I. Ševčenko ( DOP 15 [ 1961 ] 245 and n.14) hypothesize that Silvester's baptism of Constantine was represented in the 6th-C. Church of St. Polyeuktos ; the first undisputed mention of it is in the epistle sent by Pope Hadrian I to Emp. Constantine VI in the late 8th C. It is not known when the Latin Acts of Silvester, describing his miracles and the baptism of...

Arianism

Arianism   Reference library

Timothy E. Gregory and Anthony Cutler

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
599 words

...condemned by the bishop Alexander; it gained many adherents, however, throughout the East, including Eusebios of Nikomedeia . At the Council of Nicaea in 325 the Orthodox party, led by Athanasios of Alexandria, was successful in securing the acceptance of a declaration that Christ was homoousios with the Father, which resulted in the condemnation of Arianism. Emp. Constantine I , who at first supported the decisions of Nicaea, soon began to waver; the exiled Arians were recalled in 328 and many Orthodox bishops, including Athanasios , were...

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