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endurance

N. the time an aircraft can continue flying, or a ground vehicle or ship can continue operating, under specified conditions (for example, without refueling).

endurance

endurance   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Science and technology, Medicine and health
Length:
112 words

... ( staying power ) Ability to sustain a specific activity for a long period of time. Endurance has two main components that differ in the contribution they make to different types of activity. Cardiorespiratory endurance is most important in whole body activities and muscular endurance is most important in activities involving individual muscles. Sports scientists investigating functional systems have found it useful to divide endurance into short-term endurance (35 s to 2 min), medium-term endurance (2–10 min), and long-term endurance (longer than 10...

endurance

endurance n.   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... n. the time an aircraft can continue flying, or a ground vehicle or ship can continue operating, under specified conditions (for example, without...

Endurance

Endurance   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
657 words

...by the British Antarctic explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton for £13,000 on March 25, 1914 . Renamed Endurance after Shackleton’s family motto, “By endurance we conquer,” the barquentine sailed to the West India Dock, London , commanded by de Gerlache. The main aim of the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition was to make the first crossing of the Antarctic continent by dog sledge from Weddell Sea to Ross Sea, much of the journey over unknown territory. Endurance departed from the Thames on August 1, 1914 , just before the outbreak of World War I (...

endurance

endurance   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...endurance Ability to persist or continue with an occupation despite difficulty with physical fatigue, usually, but may also be used to refer to cognitive or affective endurance...

endurance

endurance   Quick reference

Food and Fitness: A Dictionary of Diet and Exercise (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... ( stamina ) The maximum duration an individual can maintain a specific activity; it is commonly called staying power. Sports scientists sometimes distinguish between activities which demand short-term endurance (between 35 seconds and 2 minutes), medium-term endurance (2–10 minutes), and long-term endurance (longer than 10 minutes). Short-term endurance activities are associated with high levels of arousal and use special white muscle fibres that can contract very quickly. The energy release for these activities (e.g. an 800 metre run) depends mainly...

Endurance

Endurance   Reference library

Lisa TOSCANO

Berkshire Encyclopedia of World Sport (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences, Society and culture
Length:
3,481 words

...with the US Air Force, he found that exercising the heart and the lungs (cardiovascular system) improves what he called “endurance fitness” or one’s working capacity. This improvement can be realized by performing prolonged exercise without undue fatigue. Cooper’s research on the connection between exercise and health motivated millions of people to exercise. Cardiovascular Endurance Cardiovascular endurance (or cardiorespiratory endurance) is a critical component of fitness because the functioning of the heart and the lungs is essential for overall wellness....

endurance pathway

endurance pathway   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... pathway A metabolic pathway to generate ATP for endurance activities. See energy system...

endurance capacity

endurance capacity   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... capacity In physiological investigations, for example, on the effects of diet, endurance capacity is the time to exhaustion during exercise of constant intensity (compare endurance...

strength endurance

strength endurance   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

...endurance The ability of a muscle to withstand fatigue while performing repeated muscle actions . See also muscular endurance...

dynamic endurance

dynamic endurance   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

...endurance The ability of a muscle to contract and relax repeatedly. Dynamic endurance can be tested, for example, during an isotonic exercise such as raising and lowering the arm. Compare static endurance...

cardiovascular endurance

cardiovascular endurance   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

...endurance The ability to sustain a large blood flow to active...

endurance performance

endurance performance   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... performance The time taken to complete a prescribed exercise, such as swimming a certain...

endurance training

endurance training   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... training Training of relatively long duration and moderate intensity, which enhances maximal oxygen uptake . Endurance training is often regarded as the prerogative of endurance athletes, but it also benefits athletes who take part in burst-type sports (e.g. football and basketball) and moderate intensity sports requiring...

endurance exercise

endurance exercise   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Sports Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Society and culture
Length:
58 words

... exercise Endurance is the time for which a specified power output, force, or speed of movement can be maintained. Endurance exercise refers to sports and activities such as marathon running which are maintained for a lengthy period of time, typically 30 minutes or more. The great majority of the energy required is derived from aerobic ...

static endurance

static endurance   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

...endurance The ability of a muscle to remain in tension for a long period of time. This may be measured by the length of time an individual can hold a body position. Compare dynamic endurance...

aerobic endurance

aerobic endurance   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Science and technology, Medicine and health
Length:
100 words

...endurance ( aerobic fitness, cardiorespiratory endurance ) The capacity to continue prolonged physical activity and withstand fatigue . The level of aerobic endurance is reflected by the length of time an aerobic exercise involving large muscle groups (e.g. running, cycling, and swimming) can be performed. It depends on the ability of the lungs and heart to take in and transport adequate amounts of oxygen to working muscles, and on the ability of the muscles to extract and use the oxygen efficiently. Most sports scientists regard maximal oxygen...

endurance force

endurance force   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... force A force identified on the basis of the formula: force = mass × acceleration, where neither the mass or acceleration component...

endurance sport

endurance sport   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... sport A sport that involves continuous high intensity exercise; for example, cross-country skiing, and long-distance running, swimming, cycling, and...

endurance riding

endurance riding   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Agriculture and Land Management

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
91 words

... riding Horse races covering up to 50–150 miles, normally over a variety of terrains and held over one to three days. The health and fitness of the horse is an integral part of this type of competition, and horses are checked by veterinarians before, during, and after the ride. A successful endurance rider will complete the course within the time allowed and with a healthy and unstressed horse. http://www.endurancegb.co.uk Website of Endurance GB, the governing body for endurance riding in Great Britain: includes details of local, national, and...

muscular endurance

muscular endurance   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

...endurance The ability of a muscle to avoid fatigue. It is reflected by the length of time a muscle can perform repeated muscle actions against a sub-maximal resistance. It can be determined by the maximum number of repetitions performed at a given percentage of an individual's one-repetition...

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