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Edward Upward

Subject: Literature

(1903–2009), novelist, educated at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, with Isherwood, whose lifelong friend he became. Works include Journey to the Border (1938); The Railway ...

Upward, Edward

Upward, Edward (1903–2009)   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to Literary Britain & Ireland (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature, Society and culture
Length:
33 words

..., Edward ( 1903–2009 ), short‐story writer , novelist , and political writer : ed. Repton (meets Christopher Isherwood) and Cambridge ( Corpus Christi College ); visits Scilly Isles 1926 . ‘The Railway Accident’ 1928 , The Mortmere Stories 1994...

Upward, Edward

Upward, Edward (1903–2009)   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Literature
Length:
147 words

..., Edward ( 1903–2009 ) Novelist , lifelong friend of Christopher Isherwood ; at Cambridge they both wrote Barbellion-inspired diaries , and invented the surreal imaginary world of ‘Mortmere’. A long Mortmere fragment appeared in Upward 's The Railway Accident and Other Stories ( 1969 ) and its fantasies are described in Isherwood 's Lions and Shadows ( 1938 ). Upward 's Journey to the Border ( 1938 ) describes the progress of a neurotic tutor in an upper-middle-class household towards commitment to the workers' movement (Upward was for some...

Upward, Edward

Upward, Edward (1903–2009)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to English Literature (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature
Length:
191 words

..., Edward ( 1903–2009 ) Novelist , born in Essex, and educated at Repton School and Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, with Christopher Isherwood , whose lifelong friend he became; at Cambridge they both wrote Barbellion-inspired diaries , and invented the surreal imaginary world of ‘Mortmere’. A long Mortmere fragment appeared in Upward 's The Railway Accident and Other Stories ( 1969 ) and its fantasies are described in Isherwood 's Lions and Shadows ( 1938 ), in which Upward appears as Allen Chalmers. Upward 's Journey to the Border (...

Upward, Edward

Upward, Edward   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

..., Edward ( Edward Falaise Upward ) ( 1903–  ), English novelist and short-story writer , born in Romford, educated at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. A schoolmaster in London from 1928 to 1962 , during the 1930s he was a member of the Communist Party and closely associated with Christopher Isherwood , Stephen Spender , and W. H. Auden . His novel Journey to the Border ( 1938 ) examines Marxism through the interior monologues of a middle-class young man employed as a tutor in the house of a rich man. Both this novel and the title story of The...

Upward, Edward [Falaise]

Upward, Edward [Falaise] (1903–2009)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Writers and their Works (3 ed.)

..., Edward [Falaise] ( 1903–2009 ) British novelist and short-story writer Buddha ( 1924 ) Poetry Journey to the Border ( 1938 ) Fiction In the Thirties ( 1962 ) Fiction The Railway Accident, and Other Stories ( 1969 ) Fiction Short Stories The Rotten Elements ( 1969 ) Fiction No Home But the Struggle ( 1977 ) Fiction The Spiral Ascent [containing In the Thirties, The Rotten Elements, No Home But the Struggle ] ( 1977 ) Fiction The Night Walk, and Other Stories ( 1987 ) Fiction Short Stories The Mortmere Stories ( 1994...

Edward Upward

Edward Upward  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1903–2009),novelist, educated at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, with Isherwood, whose lifelong friend he became. Works include Journey to the Border (1938); The Railway Accident and Other ...
Labour History

Labour History   Quick reference

John L. Halstead

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,401 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...than a class, has also dominated discussion of mid‐Victorian labour. The mid‐Victorian stratum is the ‘labour aristocracy’ introduced by Eric Hobsbawm in his essay ‘The Labour Aristocracy in Nineteenth‐Century Britain’, in Hobsbawm, Labouring Men ( 1964 ). Socially mobile upwards, but rigidly demarcated downwards, the stratum was invoked principally to explain the change in the character of working‐class political activity in the third quarter of the 19th‐century from an insurrectionary movement to one of a more peaceful, reformist, and...

Agricultural History

Agricultural History   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4,344 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...underlined and well thumbed. The first English book on agriculture— Fitzherbert 's Book of Husbandry —appeared in 1523 . The gentry were urged to see themselves as responsible, patriarchal figures. This advice became all the more attractive when food prices began their steady upward trend from about 1515 and farming became more profitable. Many of the technological improvements that earlier writers saw as determinants of an Agricultural Revolution after 1750 have been dated to much earlier periods. In The Agricultural Revolution ( 1967 ) Eric Kerridge...

5 The European Medieval Book

5 The European Medieval Book   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
9,862 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...all of England itself. Very many MSS were sold locally too. The trade was highly organized and illuminators were required to be members of the painters’ and saddlemakers’ guild of Saint Luke. Alliances with England—including the marriage of Edward IV ’s youngest sister, Margaret, to Charles, duke of Burgundy—brought Edward himself to Bruges, when forced into exile in 1470–71 . He stayed there with a local businessman and major book collector, Louis de Gruuthuse ( c .1427–92 ), who convinced his guest to begin commissioning his own luxurious MSS. This event...

28 The History of the Book in Italy

28 The History of the Book in Italy   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
10,068 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...history of the book in Italy is the absence of a solid middle-class readership. The term ‘middle-class’ here is a deliberate anachronism, designating a numerically consistent body of users who see the book as an instrument for self-improvement and as an expression of their own upward aspiration. Since Italy had enjoyed a higher level of urban *literacy than elsewhere in Europe during the early Renaissance and has never since lacked erudition nor scholars, to speak of the absence of a whole class of readers appears to be a contradiction. Nevertheless, this...

New Country

New Country  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
An anthology of prose and verse published 1933, edited by Michael Roberts, with contributions by Auden, Spender, Day‐Lewis, Empson, Isherwood, Upward, and R. Warner. Its tone was highly political, ...
dital harp

dital harp  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Music
Obsolete instr. invented in 1798 by Edward Light, a teacher of guitar: it was at first called harp guitar. By ‘dital’ is meant a finger‐key (actually played by the thumb): each dital raised the pitch ...
Left Review

Left Review  

A monthly journal of politics and literature founded in 1934 as the platform of the British section of the pro-Soviet Writers' International. Until December 1935 it was edited by a ...
New Writing

New Writing  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A book‐periodical edited by J. Lehmann, first published in 1936 and at approximately half‐yearly intervals until 1940. It published imaginative writing, mainly by young authors (including Spender, ...
Edward Weston

Edward Weston  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1886–1958).Photographer. His intense realism, formal purity, and impeccable printing played crucial roles in reorienting photographic practice toward a modern form of expression. Inspiring artistic ...
Stephen Spender

Stephen Spender  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(b. London, 28 Feb. 1909; d. London, 16 July 1995)Poet and critic. With Auden at Oxford University, Spender became known as a left-wing poet in the 1930s and wrote ...
Christopher Isherwood

Christopher Isherwood  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1904–86),novelist, born in Cheshire. He made the acquaintance of Auden (at preparatory school) and Upward (at Repton); he and Upward were at Cambridge together. His first novels, All the ...
C. Day-Lewis

C. Day-Lewis  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1904 –72),was born in Ireland. Proud of his Anglo-Irish connections, he moved with his family to England in 1905. He was educated at Sherborne and at Wadham College, Oxford ...
Alfred Marshall

Alfred Marshall  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1842–1924)British economist, regarded as one of the founders of the neoclassical school in economics.Marshall was born in London and graduated in mathematics from St John's College, Cambridge. He ...
dital harp

dital harp   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Music (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music
Length:
67 words

...harp Obsolete instrument invented in 1798 by Edward Light , a teacher of guitar: it was at first called harp guitar . By ‘dital’ is meant a finger‐key (actually played by the thumb): each dital raised the pitch of a string by a semitone. Another name was harp lute , the appearance of the instr suggesting the body of a lute continued upwards by that of a small...

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